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I've been seeing this psychologist for awhile (the first empathetic one I've met who lets me speak and also doesn't push Christianity on me), but the psychologist keeps pushing pseudoscience (peppermint oil for chronic pain being the most recent) and techniques that have a nonspecific effect that are relaxing to some individuals but not to me (visualization, meditation, etc.). My psych gets annoyed every time I disagree about something such as me not thinking acupuncture is efficacious based on journals, but also plenty of experience. I was raised in an alt medicine household, so I've had experience with many SCAMs that didn't do anything in addition to evidence. If you were in my position, would this be enough to motivate you to see someone else, or would you recommend sticking with this person since it might be difficult to find someone else that is better?
 

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Unfortunately/Fortunately (I don't truly know which one) there is a powerful extract in peppermint, that is medically recognized as being able of inducing seizures in people, with the right amount of excessive dosage. Has unique anti-body properties as well.

So yeah, it is risky in some regards as that sort of information is not as one might say, thoroughly vetted in clinical trials.

See... First search, side effects...

http://www.livestrong.com/article/115610-side-effects-peppermint-oil-capsules/

Very large quantities of peppermint oil have the potential to cause more serious problems, including seizures, muscle weakness and brain damage.
I could go on about the stuff, unfortunately my information is less than all encompassing. And the last time I posted pages worth of information, referencing science journals, wikis and popular news sources, I was censored.

CheezusCrust said:
If you were in my position, would this be enough to motivate you to see someone else, or would you recommend sticking with this person since it might be difficult to find someone else that is better?
Me personally, I have been lucky enough to enjoy advice from a few medical practitioners recently and I find all of their perspectives worthy of studying, and in some cases, doing. I also kindly turn down some suggestions, without dismissing the validity surrounding them.
 

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I've been seeing this psychologist for awhile (the first empathetic one I've met who lets me speak and also doesn't push Christianity on me), but the psychologist keeps pushing pseudoscience (peppermint oil for chronic pain being the most recent) and techniques that have a nonspecific effect that are relaxing to some individuals but not to me (visualization, meditation, etc.). My psych gets annoyed every time I disagree about something such as me not thinking acupuncture is efficacious based on journals, but also plenty of experience. I was raised in an alt medicine household, so I've had experience with many SCAMs that didn't do anything in addition to evidence. If you were in my position, would this be enough to motivate you to see someone else, or would you recommend sticking with this person since it might be difficult to find someone else that is better?
Everybody is different, so not every supplement will affect everyone the same. Acupuncture might not work for you, but there are plenty of reviews of it working for plenty of people.

Overall, it's up to you what you decide to do. Don't let the psychologist push anything on you. Do your research before you start taking something like for side effects. If they're not too serious, there's no harm in trying something. If it doesn't work for you, then just stop and try something else.

And there are plenty of scams out there, but there are plenty of things that actually work as well. I'd stick with it for awhile. If he keeps pushing stuff that you just completely disagree with, it would probably be better to start seeing somebody else. But giving something a try can't really hurt. Even if it doesn't work there are still positives you can get out of it, just like anything in life.
 

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I wouldn't drop a psychologist like that, no. I can't see any suggestions they made which I'd consider outlandish. I don't know what you mean by non-specific effects of meditation, but there's evidence it boosts immune functioning, cognitive functioning / memory, helps with anxiety and mood disorders, and pain management. So I don't think it's something to immediately dismiss. There's many ways of meditating too. Even engaging in a hobby that makes you zone out can be a form of meditating. Visualisation is a way of utilising brain neuroplasticity to make long term changes that can help with all those things I just mentioned too, among other things. This stuff is backed by neuroscience.
 

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It is all about how bothered you are about all that and whether you think there are even smallest improvements(assuming you have done at leat 15-20 meetings with her so far) or not.

If you are very bothered(maybe frustrated or angry) and see not even a small change in your behaviour or thoughts, find another one. Though you may have to restart therapy from scratch.

If you are not that bothered and, most importantly, you have seen some results, then stick to this one.


On another note, I have the feeling you are the type that is reluctant about everything going on in therapy. For example, you do need relaxation and breathing techniques. They are the most basic tools to achieve a somewhat relaxed state before, during or after an anxious episode(if you have SA and not something else).
 

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I wouldn't drop a psychologist like that, no. I can't see any suggestions they made which I'd consider outlandish. I don't know what you mean by non-specific effects of meditation, but there's evidence it boosts immune functioning, cognitive functioning / memory, helps with anxiety and mood disorders, and pain management. So I don't think it's something to immediately dismiss. There's many ways of meditating too. Even engaging in a hobby that makes you zone out can be a form of meditating. Visualisation is a way of utilising brain neuroplasticity to make long term changes that can help with all those things I just mentioned too, among other things. This stuff is backed by neuroscience.
This.

As far as visualization goes, this is the best way to achieve everything. Everything you intend on doing, whether walking or creating a space ship, is first a thought/imagination in the head. Then it is carried out and manifested. This is the law of attraction.

Visualize yourself succeeding in socializing or whatever problems you have, and eventually it will happen. By visualizing in your brain, you're sending signals to match that vibration. Imagine yourself smiling in your head. It's hard to not start smiling or just overall feel happier immediately.

If you were to do this on a consistent daily basis for 30 minutes to an hour at a time, imagine the effects it could have on your life, if just picturing smiling in your head can make you want to smile or feel positive almost instantaneously.

The way it works is your nervous system can't tell the difference between real and imagined experience. The way you learn everything, like walking, reading, talking, or socializing is from experience.

So, when you imagine an experience in full detail (imagine succeeding in a social situation and feeling really happy), it's like it's happening in real life, according to your nervous system, which is what causes social anxiety. Then your body is conditioned to feel happy in social situations, versus extremely anxious and scared to death. It's simply conditioning. Bye bye SA.

This is explained extensively in a book called psycho-cybernetics if you want to check it out. Pretty much the cheat sheet to life.
 
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