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What is your personality type? (Read the thread first before voting)

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Stoicism / ACT / CFT
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:O

Introvert(16%) iNtuitive(66%) Feeling(6%) Perceiving(9%)
You have slight preference of Introversion over Extraversion (16%)
You have distinct preference of Intuition over Sensing (66%)
You have slight preference of Feeling over Thinking (6%)
You have slight preference of Perceiving over Judging (9%)

****, I just dinged over into my original (soft and unarmoured) form from INTP. Also, movement towards extroversion. Could be that specific test though, I guess ;)
 

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About 80% of SAS member are introverted intuitives.


In a normal population for the USA it is 17% max.


So, gotta ask. Is social anxiety a byproduct of INxx typology?


Or are we socially anxious because we're a minority?

Thoughts?
 

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W/ a Gun Against My Head
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About 80% of SAS member are introverted intuitives.

In a normal population for the USA it is 17% max.

So, gotta ask. Is social anxiety a byproduct of INxx typology?

Or are we socially anxious because we're a minority?

Thoughts?
I find this pattern interesting. I think INXX may be more prone to SA since the intuitive type generally thinks about stuff more in depth, and people with SA usually over-analyze social situations and etc. The introversion then leads to less social encounters, that could have helped us see there's no big deal about socializing-especially earlier in life. That's my theory on it.
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About 80% of SAS member are introverted intuitives.

In a normal population for the USA it is 17% max.

So, gotta ask. Is social anxiety a byproduct of INxx typology?

Or are we socially anxious because we're a minority?

Thoughts?
Depending on the test and the questions, results can be impacted by SA. E.g on the test posted in the OP:

17. You spend your leisure time actively socializing with a group of people, attending parties, shopping, etc.

^ if you don't do this is that because you prefer not to? Or because you have no choice due to SA or other circumstances? I doubt the majority of this forum are genuinely introverted even though they have SA.
 

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Stoicism / ACT / CFT
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About 80% of SAS member are introverted intuitives.

In a normal population for the USA it is 17% max.

So, gotta ask. Is social anxiety a byproduct of INxx typology?

Or are we socially anxious because we're a minority?

Thoughts?
Depending on the test and the questions, results can be impacted by SA. E.g on the test posted in the OP:

17. You spend your leisure time actively socializing with a group of people, attending parties, shopping, etc.

^ if you don't do this is that because you prefer not to? Or because you have no choice due to SA or other circumstances? I doubt the majority of this forum are genuinely introverted even though they have SA.
Yup, I would guess this probably covers it. A test for introversion is going to pick up SA, because it doesn't ask for the motives for the behaviour or preference, a lot of the time.

Introversion is a funny idea though, and I don't particularly buy into it as a very accurate classification anyway (though maybe I haven't spent enough time thinking about it). I have never really bought into the whole "energy" thing ;)
 

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*sigh*

INTP
Introvert(84%) iNtuitive(25%) Thinking(62%) Perceiving(34%)
 

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Depending on the test and the questions, results can be impacted by SA. E.g on the test posted in the OP:

17. You spend your leisure time actively socializing with a group of people, attending parties, shopping, etc.

^ if you don't do this is that because you prefer not to? Or because you have no choice due to SA or other circumstances? I doubt the majority of this forum are genuinely introverted even though they have SA.
I fully agree with that. 10 years ago I would never have gone out to socialise because of how severe my SA was. These days, I like going out and I miss socialising when I'm not.

I've always been sceptical of the Myers Briggs test. Especially once I found out that Carl Jung (whose archetypes this test was based on) said that people couldn't be neatly categorised into such groups.
 

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Depending on the test and the questions, results can be impacted by SA. E.g on the test posted in the OP:

17. You spend your leisure time actively socializing with a group of people, attending parties, shopping, etc.

^ if you don't do this is that because you prefer not to? Or because you have no choice due to SA or other circumstances? I doubt the majority of this forum are genuinely introverted even though they have SA.
How do you explain the intuitive piece.

Normal population could have up to 43% IS_ _. Here it is about 19%.
 
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How do you explain the intuitive piece.

Normal population could have up to 43% IS_ _. Here it is about 19%.
The test in the OP seemed very poorly designed. The mbti generally is considered fairly poor as personality tests go, and has received a lot of criticism for its inaccuracy, but it's still fun I guess.
 

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The test in the OP seemed very poorly designed. The mbti generally is considered fairly poor as personality tests go, and has received a lot of criticism for its inaccuracy, but it's still fun I guess.
While I agree. The original test was much much longer. So the margin of error is greater.

I've seen the IN _ _ temperament over-represented in SAS way before this thread was ever created.

I think something more is at play. But I'll leave it out for everyone else to give their opinion.
 

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Yup, I would guess this probably covers it. A test for introversion is going to pick up SA, because it doesn't ask for the motives for the behaviour or preference, a lot of the time.

Introversion is a funny idea though, and I don't particularly buy into it as a very accurate classification anyway (though maybe I haven't spent enough time thinking about it). I have never really bought into the whole "energy" thing ;)
I have a lot of difficulty doing tests, not only because the difference between what I do and what I want to do is so vast, but also because my gender identity messes things up. I answer personality tests based on what I would do if I didn't feel anxious. But would I really do those things, or do I just like the idea of doing those things?

I've always been very skeptical about the extroversion/introversion dichotomy. Not just because anxiety muddies the results, but because the whole 'energy' thing seems barely a hair more rational than animal magnetism.

I think it's easier to explain the difference as a difference of interest. If you don't find people particularly interesting, and you'd rather be solving math equations or fixing your vintage biplane, having to deal with people is going to be boring and tedious, and boring and tedious activities tend to be very draining.

I find people interesting, like puzzles, so I enjoy having in-depth conversations with them. I will talk for hours (and hours ... just ask my friend, lol). So while socializing makes me incredibly anxious, if I didn't feel that anxiety, I would do a lot of it (I think) simply because I find people very interesting. By contrast, I find watching sports to be very boring and tedious, so having to sit in front of the tv with my dad and brothers watching basketball or baseball is very draining.

Considering how many different activities there are to choose from, and the natural variation in people's interest, it's logical to assume that a certain number of those people won't have any interests that involve interacting with other people. So they'll find those interactions inconvenient and annoying, the same way I find having to do my taxes inconvenient and annoying.

So it's not really a personality 'type', so much as a general way to say whether or not your natural interests include other people. And since most people have multiple interests, and may have some that involve other people and some that don't, you end up with 'partial' extroverts, etc.

But having said that, ENFP does actually describe me pretty well. :D
 

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Stoicism / ACT / CFT
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I have a lot of difficulty doing tests, not only because the difference between what I do and what I want to do is so vast, but also because my gender identity messes things up. I answer personality tests based on what I would do if I didn't feel anxious. But would I really do those things, or do I just like the idea of doing those things?
Heh, quite. Personally I know I impart a whole lot of bias into these kinds of things, I end up thinking things like "is this how I actually am, or how I would want to be?" and "I am pretty sure I secretly want this result to come out as more extroverted, and I know what this question is getting at, so should I answer what I would have before I had this thought, or after? Can I even answer what I would have before I had this thought, as surely having had it at all will introduce a bias? Should I go a little bit more introverted to make up for it, but what is a little bit?". *picks semi randomly "stfu stupid brain".

I've always been very skeptical about the extroversion/introversion dichotomy. Not just because anxiety muddies the results, but because the whole 'energy' thing seems barely a hair more rational than animal magnetism.
Indeed. "Energy", is never good ;)

I think it's easier to explain the difference as a difference of interest. If you don't find people particularly interesting, and you'd rather be solving math equations or fixing your vintage biplane, having to deal with people is going to be boring and tedious, and boring and tedious activities tend to be very draining.
This makes more sense, though how you knew about my vintage byplane obsession is a little disturbing ;). Though anxiety or depression certainly would tend to make people seem less interesting and would make the sufferer desire to interact less. Those aren't any less valid reasons for an individual not wanting to socialise, and it almost feels like there is supposed to be some kind of "pure, untainted" version of the individual that is the true introvert or extrovert or something, but you can't just strip away experience (because that's what makes minds), and what you want, or like, even if it's born from anxiety, is still a preference so it still counts right?. Would it be a reasonable argument to say "an anxious person overall doesn't want to socialise, all things considered, because they don't socialise". They might say they do, or think they do, but, ultimately they don't want to because they don't do it. Their subconscious should get a say, and its saying "nope", to the point where their behaviour clearly suggests they don't want to do it.

Ugh, I don't know, its probably not a subject worthy of this much consideration, perhaps ;)

I find people interesting, like puzzles, so I enjoy having in-depth conversations with them. I will talk for hours (and hours ... just ask my friend, lol). So while socializing makes me incredibly anxious, if I didn't feel that anxiety, I would do a lot of it (I think) simply because I find people very interesting. By contrast, I find watching sports to be very boring and tedious, so having to sit in front of the tv with my dad and brothers watching basketball or baseball is very draining.

Considering how many different activities there are to choose from, and the natural variation in people's interest, it's logical to assume that a certain number of those people won't have any interests that involve interacting with other people. So they'll find those interactions inconvenient and annoying, the same way I find having to do my taxes inconvenient and annoying.

So it's not really a personality 'type', so much as a general way to say whether or not your natural interests include other people. And since most people have multiple interests, and may have some that involve other people and some that don't, you end up with 'partial' extroverts, etc.

But having said that, ENFP does actually describe me pretty well. :D
Yeh, I mean this is the thing, I don't personally find people that interesting, but I definitely do feel happier after socialising, and during socialising, I just also slightly hate it (partly because of anxiety, but also because of what a lot of people are like. If there were more of "my kind of people" around me, I would like socialising a lot I think). At school I would have definitely qualified as an extrovert, I had masses of friends etc, was outgoing, a show off, bit of a git, etc. I was certainly an introvert for the last 10 - 15 years though, and now it's pushing back a bit in the other direction. A partial extrovert is probably about as close as I can get ;).

Out of interest, I just did the 16 personalities one:

INTP

I=85%
N=79%
T=54%
P=77%

Then I did the one at http://www.truity.com/personality-test (I haven't done this one before so perhaps I was more honest ;))

YOU MAY BE AN EXTRAVERT OR AN INTROVERT
YOU ARE AN INTUITIVE
YOU MAY BE A FEELER OR A THINKER
YOU ARE A PERCEIVER

Possible types:
ENFP (seems unlikely)
ENTP (quite likely)
INFP (hmm, dunno)
INTP (quite likely)

Psych Central: http://www3.psychcentral.com/quizzes/personality/index.php

I: 37 (I think there were opposite questions that cancelled each other out lol)
N: 53
T: 58
P: 54

So here now I reckon I am accidentally biasing to make it near to the middle :lol.

I give up ;)
 

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Lone wolf
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INFP, here. I am very in touch with my emotions, sometimes for the worst.:blush
 

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Heh, quite. Personally I know I impart a whole lot of bias into these kinds of things, I end up thinking things like "is this how I actually am, or how I would want to be?" and "I am pretty sure I secretly want this result to come out as more extroverted, and I know what this question is getting at, so should I answer what I would have before I had this thought, or after? Can I even answer what I would have before I had this thought, as surely having had it at all will introduce a bias? Should I go a little bit more introverted to make up for it, but what is a little bit?". *picks semi randomly "stfu stupid brain".
Spoken like a true neurotic. :b But yeah, I do the same thing. It's really hard to be objective about yourself.

This makes more sense, though how you knew about my vintage byplane obsession is a little disturbing ;).
You have vintage biplane aficionado written all over you. I'm surprised you don't wear an aviator cap and goggles.

Though anxiety or depression certainly would tend to make people seem less interesting and would make the sufferer desire to interact less. Those aren't any less valid reasons for an individual not wanting to socialise, and it almost feels like there is supposed to be some kind of "pure, untainted" version of the individual that is the true introvert or extrovert or something, but you can't just strip away experience (because that's what makes minds), and what you want, or like, even if it's born from anxiety, is still a preference so it still counts right?. Would it be a reasonable argument to say "an anxious person overall doesn't want to socialise, all things considered, because they don't socialise". They might say they do, or think they do, but, ultimately they don't want to because they don't do it. Their subconscious should get a say, and its saying "nope", to the point where their behaviour clearly suggests they don't want to do it.

Ugh, I don't know, its probably not a subject worthy of this much consideration, perhaps ;)
Yeah, everything is so complicated when you really start looking at it. It shows just how arbitrary the terms are. Introvert/extrovert are so vague they're all but useless.

But reducing it to a label to describe behavior doesn't work, either, imo. Would you argue that a person who doesn't want to steal because he's afraid he'll be caught should be thought of the same way as a person who has no interest in stealing? "If you really wanted to steal, you would have stolen it, but you didn't, so you didn't want to." You're reduced to saying that all a person is is whatever their current behavior is. Which I suppose you could argue, but it seems to me like you're losing an essential layer of depth in that case. They're not the same kind of person; one is trustworthy, but the other isn't. And there should be some way to make that distinction. I feel like it's my fear that prevents me from talking to people, not a disinclination to talk to them. But some people may be both disinclined and afraid.

And, ofc, to make it more complicated, I think how you think about it makes a difference. One person may want to socialize, be afraid to socialize, and reject/disown their fear as something foreign they want to get rid of (me, for example), but another person may want to socialize, be afraid to socialize, but own their fear as something inherent they don't feel any need to get rid of. Those people might be fine identifying as introverts. Then you may have people who have no interest in socializing, who are not afraid to socialize (but choose not to), and who feel no need to change how they feel (which might be as close as you can get to a 'true introvert'). Then you may have people who have no interest in socializing, who may or may not be afraid of socializing, but who feel obligated to want to socialize because socialization is considered 'normal' and they want to be considered normal. In that case, they're rejecting their disinclination itself and wishing they had the same urges as other people have. So the class "introverts" is quite a grab bag of diverse individuals.

And that, my splendid friend, is how you put too much consideration into something. :grin2:

Yeh, I mean this is the thing, I don't personally find people that interesting, but I definitely do feel happier after socialising, and during socialising, I just also slightly hate it (partly because of anxiety, but also because of what a lot of people are like. If there were more of "my kind of people" around me, I would like socialising a lot I think). At school I would have definitely qualified as an extrovert, I had masses of friends etc, was outgoing, a show off, bit of a git, etc. I was certainly an introvert for the last 10 - 15 years though, and now it's pushing back a bit in the other direction. A partial extrovert is probably about as close as I can get ;).
And then you had to go and make it even more complicated. :laugh:

People often don't know what they really want, what they really enjoy, or what an experience is really going to be like until they have it (eg. acting out a sexual fantasy). You can enjoy something without realizing it; eg. someone who enjoys making other people feel bad but considers themselves a 'nice' person. They have no idea that they're deriving pleasure from malice. Or people who enjoy feeling miserable, etc. Which makes all these self-assessments pretty dubious.

What if you think of yourself as an introvert, but actually enjoy the company of other people and unconsciously seek it out and don't realize it? Or you think of yourself as an extrovert, but actually don't enjoy yourself when you're out socializing, and unconsciously avoid it? Are those people introverts or extroverts?

Out of interest, I just did the 16 personalities one:

INTP

I=85%
N=79%
T=54%
P=77%

Then I did the one at http://www.truity.com/personality-test (I haven't done this one before so perhaps I was more honest ;))

YOU MAY BE AN EXTRAVERT OR AN INTROVERT
YOU ARE AN INTUITIVE
YOU MAY BE A FEELER OR A THINKER
YOU ARE A PERCEIVER

Possible types:
ENFP (seems unlikely)
ENTP (quite likely)
INFP (hmm, dunno)
INTP (quite likely)

Psych Central: http://www3.psychcentral.com/quizzes/personality/index.php

I: 37 (I think there were opposite questions that cancelled each other out lol)
N: 53
T: 58
P: 54

So here now I reckon I am accidentally biasing to make it near to the middle :lol.

I give up ;)
You simply defy classification, Bobbert.
 
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