Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
Psychosis... one needs Antipsychotics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
They can't! ;)
 

·
Magnanimous carcinoma
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
It's called thought broadcasting, and it's not indicative of a psychotic disorder (various things have to be going on for that). It's most likely just a part of your anxiety (and it's not uncommon), and antipsychotics are most definitely not required or even recommended for it. CBT is effective for alleviating thought broadcasting beliefs (as well as anxiety and a lot of other things), so I recommend looking into it.
 

·
UnDeRrAtED
Joined
·
34,712 Posts
hmm I remember thought broadcasting I still have problems thinking people can see my thoughts could be metaphysical ability/.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
You sure this is no symptom of a severe mental disorder if he really is sure that people can "hear" his thoughts"? Just "normal", non-paranoid anxiety.
 

·
Magnanimous carcinoma
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
You sure this is no symptom of a severe mental disorder if he really is sure that people can "hear" his thoughts"? Just "normal", non-paranoid anxiety.
No, it's not a psychotic disorder. No doctor would prescribe antipsychotics for thought broadcasting. The medication has really terrible side effects and thinking someone can hear your thoughts is not enough to warrant their administration. It's a pretty common side effect of anxiety. A lot of people with depression have depression with psychotic features, and both are treated concurrently with antidepressants (with alleviation of depression, comes allievation of the psychotic symptoms). Thought broadcasting beliefs occur comorbid with mood disorders, and aren't enough to qualify for diagnosis of a mental disorder in and of themselves. And no sensible doctor will prescribe antipsychotics for this; rightfully so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
Ok, something new I learned. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Thought broadcasting is a symptom of schizophrenia, but doesn't justify a diagnosis all by itself.

If you just feel like everyone can read your thoughts, that's plain old anxiety. If you really believe it, then you are deluded and one step closer to psychosis. If you believe it and don't find it at all bizarre, then psychosis becomes even more likely. Psychosis means that you have lost contact with some or all of reality.

If people really can hear your thoughts, you are a scientific marvel and should be making more money than Oprah.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
Wikipedia
In psychiatry, thought broadcasting is the delusion that one is capable of "inserting" thoughts into other individual's minds, or that others can perceive them (telepathy). This is one of the first rank symptoms of schizophrenia.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
I think if one is afraid that others could read his thoughts but somehow knows they can't then it's "just" anxiety. If the person is absolutely sure they can read his thoughts no matter what then that does sound paranoid to me.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,431 Posts
You sure this is no symptom of a severe mental disorder if he really is sure that people can "hear" his thoughts"? Just "normal", non-paranoid anxiety.
Paranoia -- basically anxiety where you don't rationally realize that your fears have no basis in reality. Such as seriously believing that others can read your thoughts.

Anxiety -- much the same, except one suffering from anxiety is actually attached to reality and rationally knows that their fears lack a rational foundation. Unfortunately, anxiety isn't rational and merely knowing it makes no sense doesn't make it go away.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
38,431 Posts
No, it's not a psychotic disorder. No doctor would prescribe antipsychotics for thought broadcasting.
Yet my GP prescribed me two different antipsychotics when he believed my only problems were SA, OCD, and insomnia.

Consider how commonly the antipsychotic Seroquel is used to treat insomnia. Docs will try to treat just about everything with antipsychotics today. Haven't you seen the frequent TV ads for Abilify in which they say "Two out of three patients being treated for depression still have depressive symptoms. Talk to your doctor about adding Abilify." (And then they go on to list how it can kill you and stuff as required by the FDA.:lol
 

·
Magnanimous carcinoma
Joined
·
6,888 Posts
Yeah, low doses of atypical antipsychotics can be prescribed for insomnia, because their side effects include pretty pronounced sedation. There are so many other alternatives and, given the side effects, I think they should be prescribed as an absolute last resort. In a lot of cases, that may be what occurs; I just know that I wouldn't want to be on an antipsychotic unless absolutely necessary (though atypical antipsychotics have less severe side effects).
I think if one is afraid that others could read his thoughts but somehow knows they can't then it's "just" anxiety. If the person is absolutely sure they can read his thoughts no matter what then that does sound paranoid to me.
Exactly, it is paranoid, not really psychotic. Trust me, if all you have is thought broadcasting, there's no way you're schizophrenic. And thought broadcasting isn't even a hallmark of the disorder; it occurs in many other common syndromes. For schizophrenia, you have to have at least 2 of the following: delusions, hallucinations, disorganized speech, grossly disorganized/catatonic behavior, and negative symptoms (alogia, avolition, affective flattening).

I had thought broadcasting beliefs several years ago; it was because of my depression and anxiety. I genuinely believed people could hear my thoughts; it was so bad that I would actually change what I was thinking about so that they wouldn't know my true thoughts. I look back now and think I must've been f*cking insane, but it seemed logical at that point. I don't have a psychotic disorder in remission; my anxiety and depression were so severe that they brought on psychotic features. For instance, severe major depressive disorder with psychotic features includes, most typically, delusions and/or hallucinations or, less typically, thought insertion, persecutory delusions, or delusions of thought broadcasting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,403 Posts
I do trust you. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
For instance, severe major depressive disorder with psychotic features includes, most typically, delusions and/or hallucinations or, less typically, thought insertion, persecutory delusions, or delusions of thought broadcasting.
Wow! That is really interesting. It reminds me of about 10 years ago when I had really bad anxiety and depression and wasn't being treated for it. If the weather was bad I would think that I was reason for it. For example if it was raining and the sky was really dark I would think that God thought I was such a bad person and hated me so much and that was why he was making the weather bad which is an example of a persecutory delusion(Delusion of guilt or sin (or delusion of self-accusation): This is a false feeling of remorse or guilt of delusional intensity. A person may, for example, believe that he or she has committed some horrible crime and should be punished severely. Another example is a person who is convinced that he or she is responsible for some disaster (such as fire, flood, or earthquake) with which there can be no possible connection. )

I knew it wasn't rational thinking at the time and that is why I eventually sought out therapy. I knew I had some issues and seriously needed therapy. But it goes to show how much of an effect depression and anxiety can have on ones thoughts. Thankfully I got therapy and got an AD's and no longer think that way:b
 

·
UnDeRrAtED
Joined
·
34,712 Posts
If people hearing my thoughts is a subjective experience so why does the objective world seem like they can interpret my thoughts?
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
Top