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I have always agreed with all the premises of Buddhism and identify with some of it, specially the detachment and illusions of life. Living in america has made me a little bit unhappy because everything is so materialistic and even females are supposed to accumulate riches, houses, cars and none of that stuff makes me feel good inside. My mom is constantly on my case about making more money, buying this and that and to me this is a very masculine way of thinking that has harmed me in the long run.

Achievement is such a short lived result to hours of breaking your back to get it that I wonder what is the point anymore. I published a story, I graduated, I do art and help people online yet none of these things are giving me anything worthwhile. My career is not a pleasure deriving investment, in fact it's a robotic way of studying and working that didn't give a job at the end of the tunnel, and now I'm just doing something different. I love meditating and exploring, education never encouraged this but just imposed his doctrines on everybody as gospel truth.....Anyone else not in the achievement, gotta get more money train? Are you just in peace with yourself and flowing with life as it comes despite the pressure to feel always inadequate and lacking?
 

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I grew up in/near Seattle. The ideals of Buddhism are very much welcomed here, and consumerism and commercialism are very deeply scrutinized. So I think I've been spoiled by that.

But part of the spiritual challenge of Buddhism is learning to let go of these things. It may be harder in the U.S., but it's never easy regardless of where you come from. It's not supposed to be easy. You're still measuring your spiritual joy on someone else's terms - but there are quite a few steps to enlightenment you have to reach before you get to the part where you can fully appreciate the impermanence of things. Your career is not meant to be enlightenment. Your hobbies are not meant to be enlightenment. They happen externally, and very fleetingly. It's tough to get out of that materialistic mindset, but it's possible, and it takes a lot of time and contemplation. Nobody else can get you there.

Is there a Buddhist temple that you visit? Are you active in the Buddhist community? It often helps to be more personally in touch with those who have been where you are.
 

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I was born in the US, but i also am a believer in buddhism. I do understand how you feel. I Finished HS i did 4 years of sciences and work doing stem cell research. Its not a great living but j get by fine and i get to help other who are sick, which is what is important to me. i dont need a fancy car or brand name clothes.

I also love to mediate. Do what makes you happy not what makes others happy :)
 

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I think the work we put into fleeting pleasures and disposable products is really sad. We're really expected to work our lives away. The way you're looking at life is a lot healthier than most people are doing.
 

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Most people are motivated by things
Better people are motivated by experiences
Even better by relationships
Even better by ideas
Even better by the soul and the responsibilities that bears
 

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I became a Theravada Buddhist monk for 3 months after I finished my undergrad degree and it was a life changing experience. I learned a lot of things I try to apply to my life on a daily basis.
 

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I understand this very well. It is a whole philosophy on life that is different. I didn't grow up with say "Buddhist" beliefs, however Japanese culture is heavily inspired by it. The whole idea of "nothingness" and "seeking perfection" in all aspects of life, weighs very little in American mentality of "SUPERSIZE IT!" and "Let someone else deal with it!", as well as "hardwork is for chums!, CHEAP EASY IS BEST!" lmfao So yeah it's a culture clash. I don't necessarily follow Buddhist ideals, but have studied the philosophies and different sects of the religion pretty deeply. To answer your question though, if you truly believe it and that life is an illusion, look into Gnosticism as well, Nihilism, and Existentialism.

In Buddhism, what you're going through would be "temptation" by or being seeking or being influenced by desires. That is the first thing the original Buddha sought to eliminate, as he found the bottom line of suffering was from desires. To fight the three "evils" I guess it would be called (I dislike that word, but for the ease of explaining lol) would be desire, ignorance, and anger. By eliminating those one focuses on their direct opposites, charity, knowledge, and compassion. In this Capitalistic world of materialism, fueled by greed, it would be a constant uphill battle lol. Check out the book Sidartha too if you're interested in the original Buddha, the path he took, and trials he faced on his journey.
 

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Nope. America is a place for religious freedom and you should be a Buddhist if such beliefs suit you. Hell, in a country full of materialism, greed, and sexual lust among other things, it doesn't look like America is the place for Christians, but most Americans identify as Christians. Just ignore people who pressure you to be a certain way, and tell them to respect your beliefs.
 
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