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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello!

I just discovered this new technique called "slow-talk" and I had some questions to you who use or used it as part of your recovery strategy.

As I understand when you use slow-talk in social situations, it calms you down and helps you to express your thoughts more rationally. However there seems to be more to it than that. I noticed that focusing on slowing my speech down, also allows my attention to shift from the anxiety, so that I become quite comfortable about what I say. Did experience anything similar?

Additionally since slow-talk is a non-permanent strategy, my second question is "at what point and how do you go back to your normal pace of speech"? And what is the guarantee that going back to your normal pace won't bring the anxiety back?
 

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I'm curious, where did you hear about slow talk? I've been doing the social anxiety institute's "overcoming social anxiety step by step" audio series for a while and slow talk is one of the key therapy strategies in the series.

There's a topic on slow talk on their forums if you want to check it out.
http://forum.socialanxietyinstitute.org/t/slow-talk-calming-down-strategies/25/8
The psychologist that made the series also posts there.

As far as "quitting slow talk" goes, it's my understanding that it's meant to be a second nature strategy that you do so often that it gets stuck in your mind and your response to things.... Essentially if you do get anxious after you learn all the strategies and overcome social anxiety, you will automatically use slow talk any time you get anxious and need to slow your rushing negative thoughts down.
 

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I've never heard of slow talk before but I realize that it's something I do when I'm really angry or hurt. It helps me stay a step ahead of my emotions and gives me more control of what I'm saying. It also makes me feel like I have more control of the situation. Sometimes it's the only way I can keep my cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm curious, where did you hear about slow talk? I've been doing the social anxiety institute's "overcoming social anxiety step by step" audio series for a while and slow talk is one of the key therapy strategies in the series.

There's a topic on slow talk on their forums if you want to check it out.
http://forum.socialanxietyinstitute.org/t/slow-talk-calming-down-strategies/25/8
The psychologist that made the series also posts there.

As far as "quitting slow talk" goes, it's my understanding that it's meant to be a second nature strategy that you do so often that it gets stuck in your mind and your response to things.... Essentially if you do get anxious after you learn all the strategies and overcome social anxiety, you will automatically use slow talk any time you get anxious and need to slow your rushing negative thoughts down.
Thank you for your response, ANXPhoenix! Yes, I learned the technique from Dr. Richards audio series. :) I understand what you mean, however I am somehow prone to use slow-talk in any situation, not only when I feel anxious, because it makes my thoughts more clear. And there is this fear that grows as I use slow-talk, that without it, I will get anxious again...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've never heard of slow talk before but I realize that it's something I do when I'm really angry or hurt. It helps me stay a step ahead of my emotions and gives me more control of what I'm saying. It also makes me feel like I have more control of the situation. Sometimes it's the only way I can keep my cool.
Thank you for your response! Yes, it does the same for me. :) If you want to learn more about it there are this audio series by Dr. Richards "Overcoming social anxiety, step by step"
 

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Interesting...slow talk is a little bit like mindfulness. By pausing and talking slowly you become more mindful and thus reduce anxiety.

What is Mindfulness?

Mindfulness is a state of active, open attention on the present. When you're mindful, you observe your thoughts and feelings from a distance, without judging them good or bad. Instead of letting your life pass you by, mindfulness means living in the moment and awakening to experience.
 
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