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Borderline personality Disorder

A couple of years back I was diagnosed with BPD. Begrudging to accept this diagnosis, I first shrugged it off. Well recently somethings came up and I had done a little more homework on the disorder this time. Some of the symptoms were scary accurate. The problem is that some of the main purposing around the disorder did not fit. Like the fear of abandonment, the constant feelings of emptiness. Then there were other things I believe to be a big problem that weren't even listed. So I was wondering if anyone can relate as far as not really agreeing fully with their diagnosis and that maybe some of their bigger problems were overlooked?
 

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I am a sufferer of this condition also. :) I've heard the best way to try and treat it is Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) developed by Marsha M. Linehan, though I have not undergone that myself.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dialectical_behavioral_therapy

In my experience, one must obtain a referral from a psychiatrist in order to undergo this treatment, though I did not personally qualify for the treatment because I lacked the self-injury aspects of Borderline.
 

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I have Borderline Personality Disorder as well. I copied some info about BPD. I hope it helps a bit. If you wanta talk send me a message.

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http://psychcentral.com/lib/2007/symptoms-of-borderline-personality-disorder/

Symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder
By John M. Grohol, Psy.D.
June 22, 2007

The main feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a pervasive pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image and emotions. People with borderline personality disorder are also usually very impulsive.

This disorder occurs in most by early adulthood. The unstable pattern of interacting with others has persisted for years and is usually closely related to the person's self-image and early social interactions. The pattern is present in a variety of settings (e.g., not just at work or home) and often is accompanied by a similar lability (fluctuating back and forth, sometimes in a quick manner) in a person's emotions and feelings. Relationships and the person's emotion may often be characterized as being shallow.

A person with this disorder will also often exhibit impulsive behaviors and have a majority of the following symptoms:

* Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment
* A pattern of unstable and intense interpersonal relationships characterized by alternating between extremes of idealization and devaluation
* Identity disturbance: markedly and persistently unstable self-image or sense of self
* Impulsivity in at least two areas that are potentially self-damaging (e.g., spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating)
* Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or threats, or self-mutilating behavior
* Affective instability due to a marked reactivity of mood (e.g., intense episodic dysphoria, irritability, or anxiety usually lasting a few hours and only rarely more than a few days)
* Chronic feelings of emptiness
* Inappropriate, intense anger or difficulty controlling anger (e.g., frequent displays of temper, constant anger, recurrent physical fights)
* Transient, stress-related paranoid ideation or severe dissociative symptoms

Details about Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms

Frantic efforts to avoid real or imagined abandonment.

The perception of impending separation or rejection, or the loss of external structure, can lead to profound changes in self-image, emotion, thinking and behavior. Someone with borderline personality disorder will be very sensitive to things happening around them in their environment. They experience intense abandonment fears and inappropriate anger, even when faced with a realistic separation or when there are unavoidable changes in plans. For instance, becoming very angry with someone for being a few minutes late or having to cancel a lunch date. People with borderline personality disorder may believ that this abandonment implies that they are "bad." These abandonment fears are related to an intolerance of being alone and a need to have other people with them. Their frantic efforts to avoid abandonment may include impulsive actions such as self-mutilating or suicidal behaviors.

Unstable and intense relationships.

People with borderline personality disorder may idealize potential caregivers or lovers at the first or second meeting, demand to spend a lot of time together, and share the most intimate details early in a relationship. However, they may switch quickly from idealizing other people to devaluing them, feeling that the other person does not care enough, does not give enough, is not "there" enough. These individuals can empathize with and nurture other people, but only with the expectation that the other person will "be there" in return to meet their own needs on demand. These individuals are prone to sudden and dramatic shifts in their view of others, who may alternately be seen as beneficient supports or as cruelly punitive. Such shifts other reflect disillusionment with a caregiver whose nurturing qualities had been idealized or whose rejection or abandonment is expected.

Identity disturbance.

There are sudden and dramatic shifts in self-image, characterized by shifting goals, values and vocational aspirations. There may be sudden changes in opinions and plans about career, sexual identity, values and types of friends. These individuals may suddenly change from the role of a needy supplicant for help to a righteous avenger of past mistreatment. Although they usually have a self-image that is based on being bad or evil, individuals with borderline personality disorder may at times have feelings that they do not exist at all. Such experiences usually occur in situations in which the individual feels a lack of a meaningful relationship, nurturing and support. These individuals may show worse performance in unstructured work or school situations.

Want to learn more about these characteristics of Borderline Personality Disorder? Read the detailed description of these symptoms now.
 

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I was diagnosed with borderline a few years ago. I did DBT, which did wonders for me. I have really grown. I learned a lot of mindfulness that has helped me out in many situations. If you ever want to talk, PM me!
 

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I reckon buprenorphine would be just about the best treatment for BPD possible. Removes feelings of emptiness and dysphoria.
 

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I have never been diagnosed as such, but a former pdoc wrote "Borderline Personality traits" on one of my medical forms and that surprised me. Most of it fits me, except the whole fear of abandonment thing. I thrive on alone-ness and generally don't want people in my space, emotionally or physically. So that doesn't fit at all, and since that seems to be the MAIN motivator for the other behaviors, wouldn't that one HAVE to fit?
 

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I have bpd. I am currently using the DBT self help workbook. I have most of all the symptoms. It is rumored that in the US we are the hardest to treat and difficult to deal with. I have abandoment issues as well as I have to be alone issues. I love being alone most of the time.
 

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A couple of years back I was diagnosed with BPD. Begrudging to accept this diagnosis, I first shrugged it off. Well recently somethings came up and I had done a little more homework on the disorder this time. Some of the symptoms were scary accurate. The problem is that some of the main purposing around the disorder did not fit. Like the fear of abandonment, the constant feelings of emptiness. Then there were other things I believe to be a big problem that weren't even listed. So I was wondering if anyone can relate as far as not really agreeing fully with their diagnosis and that maybe some of their bigger problems were overlooked?
te best thing to do is diagnose yourself . its pretty [email protected] easy , not rocket science at all

just go on mentalhealth.com and look at the diagnostic criteria for borderline pd

its so easy to diagnose yourself . you know if youve got it or not. you know how you feel every day , you know how you think everyday nd you know how you behave every day. a thepaist only knows what you tell them

i remeber looking at the iagnostic criteria for avoidant personallity disorder an i knew instantaly that i ahd it, it was just so obvious.

therpaist can be extremly inacurate. i remember one sed he tought i had borderline pd. but trust me i am nothing like a borderline. borderlines are erratic and angry (something im the opposite of) and i couldnt give a flying [email protected] being abandond, i simply do not care, its not an issue. but abandoment is one of the most dominat features of a borderline

the only thing i have in common with a borderline is that i impulsivelly eat and spend, does that make me a bordrline though ? absolutely not. there are millions of people wo oulsivey spemnd and eat and they do it for many different reasons.
 

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te best thing to do is diagnose yourself . its pretty [email protected] easy , not rocket science at all

just go on mentalhealth.com and look at the diagnostic criteria for borderline pd

its so easy to diagnose yourself . you know if youve got it or not. you know how you feel every day , you know how you think everyday nd you know how you behave every day. a thepaist only knows what you tell them

i remeber looking at the iagnostic criteria for avoidant personallity disorder an i knew instantaly that i ahd it, it was just so obvious.

therpaist can be extremly inacurate. i remember one sed he tought i had borderline pd. but trust me i am nothing like a borderline. borderlines are erratic and angry (something im the opposite of) and i couldnt give a flying [email protected] being abandond, i simply do not care, its not an issue. but abandoment is one of the most dominat features of a borderline

the only thing i have in common with a borderline is that i impulsivelly eat and spend, does that make me a bordrline though ? absolutely not. there are millions of people wo oulsivey spemnd and eat and they do it for many different reasons.
Not all bp are erractic. That is stereotyping. While it is easy to recognize symptoms, a diagnosis from a professional can recommend you the appropriate therapy.
I am so sick of people judging bpd. ugh!
 

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If you go back a couple of pages there was another BPD thread on here a couple of weeks back that you might want to check out.
 

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i was told a few years back that i had bpd, then since some of the obvious traits were missing they moved it to a bipolar rapid cycling disorder. they share a lot of the same reactions, and i think with enough years spent with a mental health diagnosis or illness that your coping skills aren't up to par.

seems better to treat the individual than the label. i don't know if i have bpd or bipolar disorder to be honest, either way the moods disrupt my life, so my doctor and i treat the symptoms mainly.

DBT is really good either way.
 

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I was recently told i had BPD but looking at all the symptoms, a lot of them are missing. I don't lie almost never (in fact i have a perverse habit of telling the truth even if it puts me in a bad light) I don't have rage (just inappropriate anger which seems from all the information to be undiagnosed PTSD) i don`t manipulate people (i fact i`m so aboveboard i often find myself not getting what i want because i want to be "fair") and although i do have a lot of abandonment issiues, my way of dealing with it is just cutting myself off. always has been. theres 0 fratic effort to delay or not allow abandonment. i dont cajole, threaten or cry. the lady did talk to me about DID, which i think i do have, but she said she wasn't sure so im about to go into DBT but i read that if you have DID and some BPD that its best to treat the DID first otherwise a bunch of personalities will still have BPD stuff & youll have to go again, but ive only just started getting help & it says the average sufferer spends 8 years in "the system" before they can be diagnosed as DID. so i dont know if i should keep my mouth shut or try to convince them of why i think i have DID. should i just go through the DBT to "put more tools in my tool box"?
 
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