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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am happy to see that horror is a subject that keeps emerging in this subforum, since i like the literature of the macabre or of the strange.

In this thread you can suggest stories you read which you think others might enjoy too, name authors, or even post some ideas you have for horror fiction (like what you always would have liked to read about).

Most of my work is one or other type of horror, although it is psychological in almost all pieces (a couple can have a supernatural explanation, but it exists alongside a purely physical one).

My favorite authors of the genre are Lovecraft, Poe, Machen and De Maupassant. The latter is a master of the short story, probably the greatest who ever lived, in many people's views.

My favorible horror story is "The recluse of Bayswater" (the novel of the white powder) by Arthur Machen. It is part of the novel "The three impostors" and it is available for free online, since the work is old.

My last horror story was about a curious custom in this city (i made it up) which is revealed to have been a plan to animate some part beast, part human invisible being. It is not clear if it is all a farse, but the narrator suffered a serious mental breakdown due to it and has eternally left the city.

I am looking forward to any replies. Always love discussing horror literature :)

 

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THE FIRST COUPLE OF PAGES TO THE BEST HORROR NOVEL THAT I HAVE EVER READ! BETTER THAN KING, KOONTZ ETC.

"In Brooklyn they take abandoned cars to the Fountain Avenue Automobile Pound adjacent to the Fountain Avenue Dump. The pound and the dump occupy land shown on maps as "Spring Creek Park (Proposed)." There is no spring, no creek, and no park.

Normally the pound is silent, its peace disturbed only by an occasional fight among the packs of wild dogs that roam there, or perhaps the cries of the sea gulls that hover over the stinking, smoldering dump nearby.

The members of the Police Auto Squad who visit the pound to mark derelicts for the crusher do not consider the place dangerous. Once in a while the foot-long rats will get aggressive and become the victims of target practice. The scruffy little wild dogs will also attack every so often, but they can usually be dealt with by a shot into the ground.

Auto-pound duty consists of marking big white X's on the worst of the derelicts and taking Polaroids of them to prove that they were beyond salvage in case any owners turn up.

It isn't the kind of job that the men associate with danger, much less getting killed, so Hugo DiFalco and Dennis Houlihan would have laughed in your face if you told them they had only three minutes to live when they heard the first sound behind them.

"What was that?" Houlihan asked. He was bored and wouldn't have minded getting acouple of shots off at a rat.

"A noise."

"Brilliant. That's what I thought it was too."

They both laughed. Then there was another sound, a staccato growl that ended on amurmuring high note. The two men looked at one another. "That sounds like my brother singing in the shower," DiFalco said.

From ahead of them came further sounds-rustlings and more of the unusual growls.

DiFalco and Houlihan stopped. They weren't joking anymore, but they also weren't afraid, only curious. The wet, ruined cars just didn't seem to hold any danger on this dripping autumn afternoon. But there was something out there.

They were now in the center of a circle of half-heard rustling movement. As both men realized that something had surrounded them, they had their first twinge of concern.

They now had less than one minute of life remaining. Both of them lived with the central truth of police work-it could happen anytime. But what the hell was happening now?

Then something stepped gingerly from between two derelicts and stood facing the victims.

The men were not frightened, but they sensed danger. As it had before in moments of peril, Hugo DiFalco's mind turned to a brief thought of his wife, of how she liked to say "We're an us." Dennis Houlihan felt a shiver of prickles come over him as if the hair all over his body was standing up.

"Don't move, man," DiFalco said.

It snarled at the voice. "There's more of 'em behind us, buddy." Their voices were low and controlled, the tone of professionals in trouble. They moved closer together; their shoulders touched. Both men knew that one of them had to turn around, the other keep facing this way. But they didn't need to talk about it; they had worked together too long to have to plan their moves.

DiFalco started to make the turn and draw his pistol. That was the mistake. Ten seconds later their throats were being torn out. Twenty seconds later the last life was pulsing out of their bodies. Thirty seconds later they were being systematically consumed.

Neither man had made a sound. Houlihan had seen the one in front of them twitch its eyes, but before he could follow the movement there was a searing pain in his throat and he was suddenly, desperately struggling for air through the bubbling torrent of his own blood.

DiFalco's hand had just gripped the familiar checkered wooden butt of his service revolver when it was yanked violently aside. The impression of impossibly fast-moving shapes entered his astonished mind, then something slammed into his chest and he too was bleeding, in his imagination protecting his throat as in reality his body slumped to the
ground and his mind sank into darkness.

The attackers moved almost too quickly, their speed born of nervousness at the youth of their victims. The shirts were torn open, the white chests exposed, the entrails tugged out and taken away, the precious organs swallowed. The rest was left behind."

http://www.amazon.com/Wolfen-Whitle...sr=1-1&keywords=the+wolfen+-+whitley+strieber
 

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Lovecraft fan here reporting :) I love his writing style.

But myself I am trying to write some kinda thiller regarding a nuclear power plant, I just wrote 4 or 5 pages or so, and have no real plan how it progresses lets see...
 

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The movie was horrible!! They turned an atmospheric novel about humans being hunted in a wintry, New York City into a New Age, Eco-Friendly, story about Shape-Shifting Indians!! :puke:puke

The worst book to movie translation ever except for "Bonfire of the Vanities!'
 

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cool idea for a thread :)

I love my horror. This year I've read a fair bit of Lovecraft. I'm quite addicted to listening to recordings of the short stories on youtube, it's interesting seeing the different take different readers have on the stories. (There are some great recordings of Dagon to mention just one). Nyarlathotep is also a great example of Lovecraft's cosmic terror thing.

I've yet to read Poe or De Maupassant, recommendations of people's favourite stories, or good places to start, would be appreciated.

And I finished reading Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, which isn't really frightening at all...but is interesting to read to see how much later horror fiction was influenced by it.
 

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I love Lovecraft too, as well as a few other Lovecraftian authors (ex. Joseph S. Pulver, who wrote Nightmare's Disciple). I also love Poe, Stephen King, Anne Rice, and Poppy Z. Brite. When I was younger, I really loved John Saul, too. I find his books to be too "simplified" now that I'm a bit older though.

Can anyone recommend some other great Lovecraftian authors or books?

I've yet to read Poe or De Maupassant, recommendations of people's favourite stories, or good places to start, would be appreciated.
My all-time favorite story by Poe is The Masque of the Red Death. I've read it a million times, I think. Of his, I'd also recommend all of his poetry, The Black Cat, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart. Everything he's written is wonderful though, so if you get a chance, you should try to read all of it.
 

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My all-time favorite story by Poe is The Masque of the Red Death. I've read it a million times, I think. Of his, I'd also recommend all of his poetry, The Black Cat, The Pit and the Pendulum, and The Tell-Tale Heart. Everything he's written is wonderful though, so if you get a chance, you should try to read all of it.
Thanks. The Pit and the Pendulum and The Tell-Tale Heart ring bells, think I've seen the former adapted as a short film by Jan Svankmajer...well sort of adapted, it was pretty weird, if inspired. Poe probably would have approved! And there was that great Simpsons episode about the The Tell-Tale Heart haha. Haven't heard of the The Masque of the Red Death, I'll see if my library has it next time I go. :)

Can anyone recommend some other great Lovecraftian authors or books?
Bit random, but I'm told "H. P. Lovecraft: Against the World, Against Life" by Michel Houellebecq is interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Bit random, but I'm told "H. P. Lovecraft: Against the World, Against Life" by Michel Houellebecq is interesting.
I have read that. I too found it interesting, and a bit atypical for a biography (it reads like some kind of fiction) :)

As for de Maupassant, you can find many of his works online. "He?", "The Horla", "Fear" are all good in my view, but i love most of his work anyway...
 

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Anyone try one of Barnes and Noble's "Leatherbound Classics" books? I've got the H.P. Lovecraft and the Edgar Allan Poe collections of their entire works. Might get the Hans Christian Anderson and the William Shakespeare ones too.
 

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Anyone try one of Barnes and Noble's "Leatherbound Classics" books? I've got the H.P. Lovecraft and the Edgar Allan Poe collections of their entire works. Might get the Hans Christian Anderson and the William Shakespeare ones too.
If you want a complete edition of Shakespeare, I'd highly recommend spending a little more on an annotated edition (the B&N edition contains no aids whatsoever, not even a glossary, as far as I'm aware). There are just too many words and phrases in Shakespeare that require explanation for modern readers, meaning that unannotated editions, even cheap ones, are a waste of money unless you already know the plays inside and out. The B&N leatherbound edition may look fancy on the shelf, but it's not very useful for actually reading the plays.
 

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I like reading the Anne rice novels about vampires, though not for a long time have I read it.

The next book that I'm eager to read is The world of z -apparently a very intense zombie fiction. It's has a movie adaptation starring Brad pitt
 

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If you want a complete edition of Shakespeare, I'd highly recommend spending a little more on an annotated edition (the B&N edition contains no aids whatsoever, not even a glossary, as far as I'm aware). There are just too many words and phrases in Shakespeare that require explanation for modern readers, meaning that unannotated editions, even cheap ones, are a waste of money unless you already know the plays inside and out. The B&N leatherbound edition may look fancy on the shelf, but it's not very useful for actually reading the plays.
Oh, that's too bad, but I don't doubt it. The leatherbound classics are really nice (I've almost bought a few just because they looked so fancy and "official"), but the only complaint I have with them is that the table of contents in them are kind of unorganized, and should at least be in some type of order, preferably alphabetical. Anyway, thanks for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If i may post something all too much about my own work,
i just finished some story, which is the first one that ends with my death. Since i write always in the first person, i pulled that off by having a second character (police force of some kind) write the ending passage when they discover the body.
It felt serene... I usually dislike most of what i write, but i know i will keep this one, and send it to some publisher. Worse stuff by me have been published, so why not this.
The narrator is happy, or at least somewhat hopefull, due to the prospect that he will be hired in some job and be able to move out of the house he currently cohabituates with the family. But that never will happen.

Just felt like writing a bit about the story...
 
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