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A friend suggested I do open mic stand up comedy to overcome SA. This to me seems like an extreme. The idea is that making people laugh has an effect of feeling immediate acceptance from people then in turn this will diminish my SA. So i am a student of jokes right now looking for this acceptance that making people laugh is suppose to bring. Dont know but im giving it a try. Do you readily accept someone if they make you laugh?
Have a great day,
labrador
 

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I think the confidence of the person telling the jokes also has an effect on whether or not they’ll be accepted by others. Of course they would have to find your type of humor funny in the first place, but that really depends on your audience. But overall I think doing standup comedy is a great idea. It’ll help become more comfortable telling jokes in front of people (also talking in front of people in general), and give you that confidence to go out there and be funny with people in your daily life. I know that most people do like humor, so it’s at least worth a shot.
 

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I want to try acting to overcome lingering SA issues. My hope is that I can like the person I want to be.

How do stand up comedians come up with jokes? I would like to be funny.

I notice one technique is to just give an unexpected response often the reverse of what someone expects even an absurd response.
 

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Stand-up is more about how you tell your jokes and project them rather than the actual words. Remember interaction is 80% non-verbal. Somebody standing up there who looks tense, anxious, and begging for laughs is probably not going to have nearly the same effect as someone telling the same joke who is confident, smiling, doesn't care about laughs, and telling the joke using cues such as body language and voice tone.

Also remember, exposure therapy does not work unless you change your thoughts as well.
 

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Do you readily accept someone if they make you laugh?
I'm not sure what this question means. :/

All I can say is, while I would NEVER do standup comedy, I adore when I can make other people laugh, I just do it on a much smaller scale. It's always a huge boost to my confidence when I can say or do something with the intent of soliciting a laugh and it actually works. I love when I can entertain people. :D

Stand-up is more about how you tell your jokes and project them rather than the actual words. Remember interaction is 80% non-verbal. Somebody standing up there who looks tense, anxious, and begging for laughs is probably not going to have nearly the same effect as someone telling the same joke who is confident, smiling, doesn't care about laughs, and telling the joke using cues such as body language and voice tone.
Yep. The actual delivery seems a lot more important than the words used. One reason I succeed so well with sarcasm, I'm good with deadpan humor. :teeth
 

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I actually entered in a national open mic comedy competition called "RAW Comedy" that I performed in last month.

I actually got some laughs, and a couple of my bits got applause so that's good. I've always been told I'm funny and I want to break into comedy in some capacity. I don't have much of a problem "performing"; it's just that I find it more difficult personally talking to people. I was less anxious about going up on stage then I am going to parties.

I didn't make it to the finals of the competition; but I got myself a spot at an open mic night at a bar at the beginning of March that I hope goes well.
 

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Making kids laugh actually makes my job easier. It relaxes them and makes them less nervous around me.

It is good to make other people laugh. I try to be funny in my everyday life. It's easier with kids than adults, though.
 

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Hey cool stuff!

I actually entered in a national open mic comedy competition called "RAW Comedy" that I performed in last month.

I actually got some laughs, and a couple of my bits got applause so that's good. I've always been told I'm funny and I want to break into comedy in some capacity. I don't have much of a problem "performing"; it's just that I find it more difficult personally talking to people. I was less anxious about going up on stage then I am going to parties.

I have an easier time preforming then dealing one on one as well

I didn't make it to the finals of the competition; but I got myself a spot at an open mic night at a bar at the beginning of March that I hope goes well.
It sounds like yur ding smashingly

:clap
 

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I am a (former) stand-up. Comedy is great, if you understand things like joke structure, observation and acting. Otherwise, it can be an awkward experience on stage. As for making people laugh, I've noticed that some people take me less seriously when I make them laugh. I find that just being myself and trying to sprinkle in a few witty non-offensive comments, or self-deprecating comments, helps in social situations. But, performance does not always help social anxiety (example: me).
It is a good idea to do comedy (IMHO), but understand that on stage, you're an actor. Off stage, it is not important to make people laugh, per se, as much as it is to make people smile.
 

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I find that just being myself and trying to sprinkle in a few witty non-offensive comments, or self-deprecating comments, helps in social situations.
In my experience as well. You really don't want to overwhelm people trying to be funny when most people, "in real life," aren't trying 100% of the time to be a comedian. I've found some of the best humor to be that which is just scattered around in regular life. (Thus why I don't write much solid comedy fiction, but my dramatic fiction has lots of little funny moments to break it up some. They tend to stand out more that way, as well as seem more natural.)

Ditto on self-deprecating comments, I've found those can really help in awkward situations (as long as they aren't seriously overdone). When people see you can laugh at your own shortcomings it tends to put them at ease.

It is a good idea to do comedy (IMHO), but understand that on stage, you're an actor. Off stage, it is not important to make people laugh, per se, as much as it is to make people smile.
:yes

(Though I still love making people laugh when I can. :teeth )
 
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