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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I haven't worked in 8 months and only have lightly tried finding work. I need a job badly now, being a recent college graduate, but my chosen field is more of a self-starter industry. In the meantime, I'm going to have to man up, face the ridiculous amount of anxiety, and apply for a crummy retail job again. Well, my employment history is spotty (I've read that's kind of "normal" with social anxiety sufferers) and I get nervous around people.
What's worse is, in the passed year my hearing has gotten quite bad. I've always had problems hearing that have progressively gotten worse but now it's noticeable bad. That makes things much more difficult (and embarrassing!). But these are things I believe an employer should know.
I figure a boss might understand why you seem a little weird if they at least partially understand where you're coming from. And as for the hearing issue, well I feel its only right to tell because- they're either going to notice or get upset if they find out it's affecting job performance...

I don't know... Just how much should one tell a potential or new employer?

ADDENDUM: Because I already know not to tell them the reason I left one of my more recent jobs is because the manager was a B*you-know-what, and that in between actual held jobs in the long absences between employers I worked under the table at warehouses or wherever to make money- stuff I maybe didn't pay taxes on, maybe (just saying its a possibility).
 

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Definitely shouldn't tell a potential employer that you have social anxiety. Not being good with people is not a good quality in ANY job. You will not get hired by anybody if you give them any idea that you're not good with people.
 

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Little Winged One
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If I were the boss,I'd appreciate the honesty and think quite highly of you for it,but...most people only want to hear lies in this situation.-Insincerity is valued above all in interviews.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I get nervous when I lie. And it shows.
Of course I also get nervous when I don't lie but then assume they think I'm lying and that shows...

:sus
 

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I think it depends on the job and the boss. If you're going to be interacting with people a lot it might be something that could come up with someone who seems particularly open minded. However, that's a fast way to get scratched off the list. Legally they can't discriminate against you but there are a ton of other excuses they could use ranging from education to gut feeling about the superior candidate. I've wrestled with this myself. If the interview is a favour of sorts, ie. the boss knows a friend or family member that referred you, I'd be honest. But if you're anonymous I would not mention it.
 

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I get nervous when I lie. And it shows.
Of course I also get nervous when I don't lie but then assume they think I'm lying and that shows...

:sus
Its not like your lying, just show him your good qualities and do your best to hide "bad" ones. Think of it from his point of view. He wants to hire the most qualified person he can. He'll probably appreciate your honesty but he'll also definitely take note of it (and not in a good way)
 

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I would say no unless you have examples of how you actively worked to combat it (toastmasters, volunteer work, etc), which shows initiative. Get the hearing checked by a doctor and get a hearing aid if you need it before interviews.
 

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Its not like your lying, just show him your good qualities and do your best to hide "bad" ones. Think of it from his point of view. He wants to hire the most qualified person he can. He'll probably appreciate your honesty but he'll also definitely take note of it (and not in a good way)
I agree. Try to focus on what you can do instead of what you can't. Pointing out your flaws in a job interview or at work will work against you.
 

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Lateralus
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An emphatic no.

In this **** economy, customer service is even more valued than usual by employers - they're going to want to be convinced that you can work well with others. Not just customers, but co-workers as well. There is nothing in it for you by informing him of your anxiety issues. No possibility of extra pay. Nothing.

By telling him of your SA, you dramatically decrease your chances of getting the job.
 

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I work in HR and I really wouldn't tell a potential employer about your SA. Usually when companies are recruiting, they are looking for a person who can do the job (or have potential) and the most they want to worry about is providing training linked to the job role ….not having to worry about social skills as well.

You should definitely explain about your hearing, and also say that you are nervous when in interviews etc. They will be understanding to nerves and especially to hearing difficulties.

Sometimes with my colleagues not knowing it pushes me to do things that usually I would avoid and it really does help even though it's scary. Yes you have to do lot of pretending/acting and tell the odd lie every now and then, but I'm glad that I don't receive any 'special treatment' from my work - I'm glad I'm not a bother to them.

I told my boss the truth after working for the company for a year and a half, I'm glad that I waited so that she could see that I was actually quite good at my job and that she had nothing to worry about - and at least now she knows why I behave the way I do in certain situations & meetings.
 

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Not sure if it's been said but I don't think you should tell them before you get the job.
Only explain after you've been hired, and only if it's causing any problems.
They'll be more understanding if you tell them once you're already working for them just because it makes better business sense(cents?) for them to help you out instead of finding a new employee. It's usually less expensive that way.
 

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As others have said, telling the boss you have SA is probably a bad idea. I wouldn't tell him about your hearing loss, either. It would be like presenting your flaws on a platter.
 

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Sharon Shinwell
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NO. It's a dog eat dog world out there with thousands of applicants to every vacancy advertised - they will pick the cream off the top (if the job hasn't already been allocated internally and they are just going through the motions because they have to) so don't give anyone a chance to put your application in the bin. Things might change for you and improve, so why let them have that piece of your private life to hold on file? As for your hearing loss, I assume this is untreatable or you wouldn't mention it, as long as you feel it won't stop you doing the job you are applying for, there shouldn't be an issue. If it does, the job perhaps isn't the right one to apply for.
 

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Absolutely not!
I got fired from my last job not long after my boss found out about my SA (my SA related behaviour was getting worse at that point). Although she did not tell it to my face, (she gave me some crap about duties being reshuffled and all) I am 100% sure that she dropped me because of my SA. So, my advice: Don't ever tell your boss about your SA.
 

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roarrrr
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I've been wrestling with this question as well. Since I just started applying to places for my first job. Mostly Starbucks and Barnes&Noble. I thought maybe it would be a good idea at first to tell them in an interview, but now I don't think so. On the outside, when I have to talk, I think I appear quite normal. If I tell them that I have SA, they'll think that I won't be able to do the job of handling customers. And then.. I wouldn't get the job. So I decided that I'm going to remain quiet about that. The best thing is to act normal and believe you're normal. There's no problem with you. At most, you're 'shy', but want to get over that. That's what you can say if it starts showing while working.
 

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spider from mars
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I would tell them you get a little nervous at interviews, because that's pretty common and understandable and it would excuse your obvious symptoms of SA. You might even stretch to admitting (but only if it comes up!) that you're "reserved" but downplay it. SA is unfortunately not well understood and an employer might think you are trying to make excuses, or that you just won't fit in.

But if you have made any significant progress with your SA, you could mention it, like the poster above says. Put a positive spin on it, focusing on how you dedicated yourself to improving and getting over your fear, rather than the fear itself.
 

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I have used the words 'shy, but get along with people very well' to describe myself, but never used the words 'social anxiety'. I don't go for sales jobs, just behind the scenes type jobs, so it wasn't really an issue.
 
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