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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you have on your resume? I am going to be graduating in a year and I have almost nothing to put on my resume because I have not joined any clubs or been involved/active on campus. I did work as an office assistant for all my time in college (however, my job will involve lab work since I am studying to become a medical technologist) and I am a part of two honor societies but did not go to any meetings/ am not involved in their activities. Also, I am going to join a professional association (American Society for Clinical Pathology). I have a really good gpa (3.9). I also speak, read and write Polish fluently. Does anyone have any suggestions on what I could do to improve my resume? I'm just worried that I don't have enough experiences to talk about in interviews, etc. Any comments would be very helpful and appreciated.
 

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Clubs arent important I dont think. I would discuss the classes that you took, and how they related to the profession you want to get involved with. Drop in that GPA too
 

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Thanks for the response. I just feel like there is no way I will get a job. I don't know what I would say during the interview. Anyone have any suggestions, ideas or stories about your resume or how you got your job? Anything would be helpful.:)
 

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There's no perfect resume. What looks wonderful to one employer might look dull to another. Generally speaking though, if you put unique aspects of yourself, you may pique someone's interest. For example, you should definitely include your Polish language skills. It's unique so it may really catch someone's eye if they happen to have an interest in that area.

Sending out resumes is not the most effective way to get a job. Better ways are through internships or by networking. I know this is hard for those with SA... it's simply not easy for us. But actually speaking with someone, even briefly, is far more likely to get you a job. Try to go to job fairs or conferences in your field and get to know people who already work in it.

The information you posted sounds wonderful. You've worked throughout college, you have an excellent gpa and you're in two honor societies... those are great achievements. Keep your resume to one page and point out stuff you accomplished in your job that shows you're responsible and diligent. If you can, point out increasing responsibility placed on you at work... this shows your employer trusted you enough to give you more responsibility.
 

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I just attended a resume-writing workshop and got some good tips. First off, you probably want to make your resume a Functional Resume rather than Chronological Resume. About 80% of people searching for jobs use the chronological so it's very easy to get lost in the mix. Functional resumes stand out more. You can probably google it for some examples.

What employers are really looking for on your resume is transferable skills,not necessarily where you worked. Where you worked is still important, but they aren't hiring your last employer; they're hiring you the person and what particular skills and traits you will bring to the table. Most people completely ignore their transferable skills and don't even realize they have them. They zone in only on what their specific work history was and only what they did at that job.

Anyway, if you have any questions, shoot me a message. I'm totally rewriting my resume, too.
 

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You are so lucky! You are still in school so you have time to polish up that resume. The most important thing you need to do right now is get to your school's career center. They have tons of resources including handouts with examples of transferable skills to resume writing workshops, etc. Please don't disregard this advice because most college students forget to use their CC even though they are paying for it. I used mine only in my last year and found that I really wanted it after graduation. Too bad the prices are insane as an alum.

Also, don't worry about not having a lot on your resume, truth be told, no one really had much as a college student. Only those that pursued internships had substantial stuff, so you know the drill, start applying to internships, research labs, etc anything you can think of that would be helpful to someone aspiring to be a medical technologist. Btw, talk to your CC about reaching out to alums in your profession of choice. They often have a network and you can get advice from someone who was recently in your shoes.

Good luck!
 
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