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When I was made redundant last year I asked two coworkers if they can be my reference and they generously agreed.

But it's been a while now and I'm hesitant in asking them if they are still okay with me using them as a reference.

I think one would be okay to but I don't think the other one will be. I messaged her last year and she wasn't interested in engaging with me and when I told her to not work too hard and that she is a good worker, she haven't replied since.

I have two ex colleagues that I can ask but I don't want to bother them and would feel that I'm using them.
 

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We all wear a mask.
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I haven't had to worry about needing references for 7 years now but I certainly remember the struggle of needing them but not having them due to my introverted nature and not talking to anyone.

In the future, if I need references for anything, I'm just going to be honest. "I don't have any and this is why. You can either hire me for the job and i'll be damned good at it or you can hire some socialite with a myriad of references and get half-assed results."

Certainly wish you well in your endeavor. Give them a ring. Wouldn't hurt and if one or more say no, at least you tried.
 

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hmmmmm in my resume, under references, i just put reference can be available upon request or something along that line and I still get jobs interviewing me and I got this jib as well without ever putting an actual reference.

Sent from my SM-G998U using Tapatalk
 

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I don't have any references. The places I have worked at have gone out of business, so there's no one for them to call. I'd have to use personal references, and I don't have any of those. I haven't talked to anyone I worked with in about a decade now.
 

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Failure's Art
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I've never needed references for any of the jobs I've ever had, including my professional ones. No one has ever asked for them. Not sure if that's something that is even still done today. Its kind of problematic to be honest because if you ask your current boss to serve as a reference for you they'll know that you're job hunting which is kind of awkward.
 

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I've never needed references for any of the jobs I've ever had, including my professional ones. No one has ever asked for them. Not sure if that's something that is even still done today. Its kind of problematic to be honest because if you ask your current boss to serve as a reference for you they'll know that you're job hunting which is kind of awkward.
Idk how other people do it, but where I work it was company policy to check a person's references before we hired them. I was co-responsible for hiring for years and I never hired anyone without first checking their references, and I did pass on a couple people who got less than glowing reviews from those calls. Not having references would have been a huge red flag. Not having work references (having only personal references) would have made us think twice before hiring unless you were fairly young (like 21 or under) or in school fulltime.

Not trying to discourage anyone or saying it's like this everywhere, or that things haven't changed a lot in the last decade with the gig economy, just saying that's what it was like in olden times.
 

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Failure's Art
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Idk how other people do it, but where I work it was company policy to check a person's references before we hired them. I was co-responsible for hiring for years and I never hired anyone without first checking their references, and I did pass on a couple people who got less than glowing reviews from those calls. Not having references would have been a huge red flag. Not having work references (having only personal references) would have made us think twice before hiring unless you were fairly young (like 21 or under) or in school fulltime.

Not trying to discourage anyone or saying it's like this everywhere, or that things haven't changed a lot in the last decade with the gig economy, just saying that's what it was like in olden times.
Actually, now that I think about it I have served as references for other people, twice I think. I've never had to provide my own references but I did have two former employees ask me to serve as their reference. Not sure why I forgot this. It's pretty funny when I think about it because I have terrible phone call anxiety and so me serving as your reference basically guarantees you won't get hired :LOL:

I think things might be different when you work for a giant corporation like do. They hire so many people so often it's like they just throw a giant net into the talent pool and pull in whoever happens to be there. The turnover rate can be tremendous. I think there is actually less consideration for someone's fit for a role (at the lower levels at least) in a giant corporation than there is with a smaller company. Probably why someone like me with my issues was able to find (and keep) a job there.
 

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I think things might be different when you work for a giant corporation like do. They hire so many people so often it's like they just throw a giant net into the talent pool and pull in whoever happens to be there. The turnover rate can be tremendous. I think there is actually less consideration for someone's fit for a role (at the lower levels at least) in a giant corporation than there is with a smaller company. Probably why someone like me with my issues was able to find (and keep) a job there.
Well, I worked for a large company, and it was very bureaucratic. Turnover was also very high. I hired frontend workers (sales reps) and we didn't worry too much about whether or not someone was "fit" for the role in terms of prior retail/sales experience, because it was easy enough to train them, but because we handled customer accounts with sensitive information we tried to weed out sketchy people. Sketchy people tend not to give out work references because they don't want us talking to their former employers. So if you're in your mid-20s+ and you have no work references it can look a little suspicious.

Not having references is probably one of the reasons I found it so hard to get a permanent job. For years the only thing I could get was temp work through the agency. I must have applied at over 300 places before I finally got a non-temp job. But it's probably mostly because I look and act weird.
 

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When I was made redundant last year I asked two coworkers if they can be my reference and they generously agreed.

But it's been a while now and I'm hesitant in asking them if they are still okay with me using them as a reference.

I think one would be okay to but I don't think the other one will be. I messaged her last year and she wasn't interested in engaging with me and when I told her to not work too hard and that she is a good worker, she haven't replied since.

I have two ex colleagues that I can ask but I don't want to bother them and would feel that I'm using them.
In light of you already been advised replies regarding the likelihood of being asked for references, I just wanted to add regarding your original query.

Since you've already tried reaching out to the second person, it'd be advisable to reach out again and directly asking if she'd still be okay for giving her a reference. If she doesn't reply, then personally I'd write her off as a reference. There's nothing wrong intrinsically wrong with putting her down as your reference - but if she fails to respond to your prospective employer then that's not going to put you in a good light.

Regarding your other 2 ex-colleagues, it's up to them whether they feel like you're bothering them. Ideally, you'll also take the opportunity to catch up with them and since you're in a tough situation, they'll hopefully understand why you're reaching out to them, and will see no harm in you doing so.

Edit: By the way - I also just want to commend you for aiming to be proactive and ensure you're fully prepared ahead of your next job opportunity, instead of waiting and hoping all works out for the best and so having to be reactive if it doesn't.
 
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