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I used to think that breathing techniques in order to calm myself down in a stressful situation was a bunch of BS. I think I made a half-hearted attempt at it, not really knowing the proper way and then giving up on it rather quickly. Using CBT and rational thinking, I took a significant step in getting some relief from SA. But, when I am around a group pf people and the fight or flight is in full swing I found it near impossible to step back and rationalize what was going on. There had to be preparation before and analysis after but it seemed nothing could help me during the event. I bought a book recommended by my psychologist called the Relaxation and Stress Management Workbook. From the very beginning it explains simple breathing techniques that stimulates the relaxation response. So, I went to a therapy group yesterday and tried it out. I easily recognized the numerous fight or flight responses beginning to manifest. I noticed how my breathing was very shallow and centered in my chest area. I took a few deep breaths expanding my diaphragm and was able to actually stop the fight or flight from continuing. I had to do this many times but at least I could keep it from happening for the usual 15 minutes and just waiting it out. Maybe the way to fight this is learning how to manipulate the relaxation response which can allow you to step back and rationalize. And maybe eventually, once your mind learns to relax more and more in stressful SA situations it will believe that there is nothing to fear and won't start the alarm bells. I don't know. Its something I just started experimenting with but any hope towards getting better is good.
 

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How you deal with adrenal stress comes down to experience, the more experience you have of it the more you learn to react under it.

The trouble is that when a fight or flight responce occurs the brain gets a bit of an overload and inexperience people don't know how to handle that overload.

I'd suggest reading up on bodily reactions to adrenalin, it'll help give you an idea of what's going on and how best to go about learning to tackle it.
 

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I used to think that breathing techniques in order to calm myself down in a stressful situation was a bunch of BS. I think I made a half-hearted attempt at it, not really knowing the proper way and then giving up on it rather quickly. Using CBT and rational thinking, I took a significant step in getting some relief from SA. But, when I am around a group pf people and the fight or flight is in full swing I found it near impossible to step back and rationalize what was going on. There had to be preparation before and analysis after but it seemed nothing could help me during the event. I bought a book recommended by my psychologist called the Relaxation and Stress Management Workbook. From the very beginning it explains simple breathing techniques that stimulates the relaxation response. So, I went to a therapy group yesterday and tried it out. I easily recognized the numerous fight or flight responses beginning to manifest. I noticed how my breathing was very shallow and centered in my chest area. I took a few deep breaths expanding my diaphragm and was able to actually stop the fight or flight from continuing. I had to do this many times but at least I could keep it from happening for the usual 15 minutes and just waiting it out. Maybe the way to fight this is learning how to manipulate the relaxation response which can allow you to step back and rationalize. And maybe eventually, once your mind learns to relax more and more in stressful SA situations it will believe that there is nothing to fear and won't start the alarm bells. I don't know. Its something I just started experimenting with but any hope towards getting better is good.
the flight or fight response is run by the uncocnious mind.

ifthe ncocnious runs it when you are in a stuation then trying to fight the unconcious by conciously using cbt statements is like trying to fight mike tyson.

the best way to do it is make a change on the uncocnious level. if you change things uncconiously then the fight or flight repsonse wont get triggered int he 1st place
 

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I have found that jogging is the most effective method to reduce my fight or flight response. It literally burns away the adrenaline. Before a scary event a good jog works better than xanax :)
 

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No doubt exercise can help. though I was still very depressed and anxious even after intense weight training, nutrition, and cardio. Medication was my last resort and saved me a lot time and frustration. The younger you are the better.
 

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No doubt exercise can help. though I was still very depressed and anxious even after intense weight training, nutrition, and cardio. Medication was my last resort and saved me a lot time and frustration. The younger you are the better.
Exercise can help ease it IME also if you're a heavy set person that can help since there's more blood to go round your system.
 

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How you deal with adrenal stress comes down to experience, the more experience you have of it the more you learn to react under it.

The trouble is that when a fight or flight responce occurs the brain gets a bit of an overload and inexperience people don't know how to handle that overload.

I'd suggest reading up on bodily reactions to adrenalin, it'll help give you an idea of what's going on and how best to go about learning to tackle it.
Any suggestions on books? This is a MAJOR problem for me. Anytime I deal with conflict, when I KNOW the other person is treating me badly, I get an overwhelming adrenaline rush that makes it very hard for me to physically speak. Seriously, my throat closes up and I feel like I'm about to cry if I speak. This is 'fight or flight' at its worst. I wish I had taken debate courses back in school, I wonder if this might have prepared me better for real professional world situations of conflict.
 

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Any suggestions on books? This is a MAJOR problem for me. Anytime I deal with conflict, when I KNOW the other person is treating me badly, I get an overwhelming adrenaline rush that makes it very hard for me to physically speak. Seriously, my throat closes up and I feel like I'm about to cry if I speak. This is 'fight or flight' at its worst. I wish I had taken debate courses back in school, I wonder if this might have prepared me better for real professional world situations of conflict.
I can recommend a few books but in all honesty they'll only help a little.

This one should be fairly easy to get in the US, I was surprised to find it over here.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Meditations...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247848080&sr=8-1

Also I'd recommend this one but you'll probably find it harder to get over there.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Alive-...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247848235&sr=1-1

To be honest having the information will only take you so far. As I said it can help if you understand the science of adrenalin and why your body does what it does but its experience that makes the difference. I'd suggest finding yourself a decent Boxing gym or anything hardcore/full contact since that'll help a lot to deal with the fear. Also if you can get yourself on one of these courses that can also help a lot.

http://www.fastdefense.us/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1

Basically IMV (feel free to disagree with me) the main reason people freeze up during these sorts of confrontations is down to a fear of being humiliated (both physically and mentally), a fear being hurt and a fear of comebacks (such as that person getting you later with his mates in tow). All of which can only really be tackled by increasing your self belief and that can only really be achieved by some sort of training.
 

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I can recommend a few books but in all honesty they'll only help a little.

This one should be fairly easy to get in the US, I was surprised to find it over here.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Meditations...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247848080&sr=8-1

Also I'd recommend this one but you'll probably find it harder to get over there.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Alive-...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247848235&sr=1-1

To be honest having the information will only take you so far. As I said it can help if you understand the science of adrenalin and why your body does what it does but its experience that makes the difference. I'd suggest finding yourself a decent Boxing gym or anything hardcore/full contact since that'll help a lot to deal with the fear. Also if you can get yourself on one of these courses that can also help a lot.

http://www.fastdefense.us/index.php?option=com_frontpage&Itemid=1

Basically IMV (feel free to disagree with me) the main reason people freeze up during these sorts of confrontations is down to a fear of being humiliated (both physically and mentally), a fear being hurt and a fear of comebacks (such as that person getting you later with his mates in tow). All of which can only really be tackled by increasing your self belief and that can only really be achieved by some sort of training.
Thanks for the links, I'll check them out. I think for me the fear is more about getting taken advantage of rather than getting physically hurt. I've never really been in situations where someone threatened to physically hurt me (although I avoid bars and such, so it would be rare anyway). For me its a mental fear of someone else being able to do something to hurt my career or hurt me financially or socially.

Examples:

-At work, if my boss wrongly accuses me of something, and I have to defend myself. Or if a client is being unreasonable, I might fear deep down that if I don't handle it properly that they will tell my boss or do something to get me fired or make me work unnessarily long hours to meet their unreasonable deadline. And of course my fears get excessive, I start worrying that if I don't react the right way that I may lose my job, then not be able to pay my rent, etc.

-Or if there's a problem with my apartment, and I have to confront management about it. I worry they may try to take advantage of me, and then I'd have to live with a problem or whatever.

-Or at work, if a new coworker is trying to be bossy with me, when they have no right, that's another one.
 

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Thanks for the links, I'll check them out. I think for me the fear is more about getting taken advantage of rather than getting physically hurt. I've never really been in situations where someone threatened to physically hurt me (although I avoid bars and such, so it would be rare anyway). For me its a mental fear of someone else being able to do something to hurt my career or hurt me financially or socially.

Examples:

-At work, if my boss wrongly accuses me of something, and I have to defend myself. Or if a client is being unreasonable, I might fear deep down that if I don't handle it properly that they will tell my boss or do something to get me fired or make me work unnessarily long hours to meet their unreasonable deadline. And of course my fears get excessive, I start worrying that if I don't react the right way that I may lose my job, then not be able to pay my rent, etc.

-Or if there's a problem with my apartment, and I have to confront management about it. I worry they may try to take advantage of me, and then I'd have to live with a problem or whatever.

-Or at work, if a new coworker is trying to be bossy with me, when they have no right, that's another one.
It all falls under confrontation regardless of how it's done. Tackling one area of that fear should spill over into others.
 

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I'm still trying to manage my body's fight or flight responses...i've never had a panic attack, but feeling on edge all the time and not ever feeling relaxed is EXHAUSTING.I don't want to go on meds, but if it doesn't improve I will have to.
 

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I never wanted to go on meds until I heard of Propronolol. All it does is block the flight/fight response. Its been used since like the 60's, ultra safe, and even healthy (lowers blood pressure), SUPER easy to get, just ask your doc, they hand these out like candy. Even 'normal' people take them. They're particularly popular amongst people who perform on stage (they too get anxious/stage anxiety).

Basically, what happens is, say you have to get up in front of the class and give a presentation. This normally causes you massive anxiety, you freak out, your hands tremble, you sweat, your voice is shaky, you feel cold/clammy and your heart is pounding at an insane rate.

The reason for this is because you interpret the situation as threatening, which causes you all those physical symptoms. Your brain overloads your Beta-Receptors on your adrenal glands to release adrenaline to cope with the threatening situation.

So, you get Inderal (Propronolol). You take it on an as needed basis, and, you take as much as you need, 10mg, 20mg, 30mg, whatever you want. Think of it as like a "Cork" to block the release of the adrenaline. The more you take, the bigger the cork (or blockage).

I obtained a prescription from my doc, I just asked for it for performance anxiety and he was like 'Oh, yeah sure, heres 2 refills too". AND, its under the $5.00 prescriptions here in the US. Its CHEAPER than herbal meds! And proven to work, has been for the last 40 something years. A measely $5.00 for 60 of these amazing pills and all the physical anxiety symptoms gone.

I take 2 (10mg each) so 20mg total about 1-2hrs before something and walk into situations knowing I wont get anxious. Its so nice not to have the anticipatory anxiety of worrying how anxious you'll get (or appear) to others.

Its also NOT a sedative, it doesnt make you sleepy at all. Keep in mind, all it does is stop the amount of adrenaline being released, so you feel normal and not in the fight/flight response mode.

Its also nice because its something you take when you want, and you take as much as you need, not something you need to take daily or anything.

Basically after taking it, its interesting to go to a threatening situation (say you're going to give a presentation). Your name is called, but you popped 20mg of Inderal an hour or two earlier. You go up in front of the class, your MIND is racing "Oh god, im going to get nervous, watch i'll get nervous like usual, oh geez". You will STILL have those thoughts.

But, when you start talking? Guess what, your voice is smooth, your heartrate is normal, your hands are firm. Once you realize that you dont have any physical anxiety, the mental anxiety disappears. Its like "Oh, look, im not anxious, sweet!". And walaa, you perform confidently. I think it also helps boost self-esteem in that sense because if people start saying "Nice presentation, you looked confident up there", etc. this certainly helps with your confidence, esteem, and overcoming several aspects of SA.
 

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I'd be sceptical about just how much meds are really going to help since it's only likely to be a stop gap solution.
 

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I'd be sceptical about just how much meds are really going to help since it's only likely to be a stop gap solution.
That's what I was thinking. And I would think you'd have to be on the prop non stop all day long, because you never know when a situation is going to arise. I took beta blockers back in college for presentations, I can't really say they helped much. But then presentations don't give me the kind of adrenaline spike that those other situations I mentioned do.
 

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beta blockers experience felt fake

i tried the other day, propranolol, but i felt like a little bit fake, and that gave a mental panic attack....

i dont know, i came to the conclution that, either, im so used to feel paniki, that i felt like people, where like noticing, that i wasnt, and i didnt knew how to react to that, like, it felt just on a diferrent dimension, and i like wasnt ready for it.....

or/and .. also feel like whe have to have a little bit of the fight and flight on us all the time, because that like regulates the tone of the conversation, like your cues, and the vibe and stuff... i ended up not really knowing what was real, like feeling the anxiety, or just feeling completely secure, as to when it is with propranolol... if anybody can help me here,,....and isnt there like a betablocker that is partial, or that like when it goes out of control, it kicks into effect...like some sort of an anti-hulk thing,, instead of busrting, it kicks and it dosent tip over.. that would be awesome... :teeth DH
 

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i tried the other day, propranolol, but i felt like a little bit fake, and that gave a mental panic attack....

i dont know, i came to the conclution that, either, im so used to feel paniki, that i felt like people, where like noticing, that i wasnt, and i didnt knew how to react to that, like, it felt just on a diferrent dimension, and i like wasnt ready for it.....

or/and .. also feel like whe have to have a little bit of the fight and flight on us all the time, because that like regulates the tone of the conversation, like your cues, and the vibe and stuff... i ended up not really knowing what was real, like feeling the anxiety, or just feeling completely secure, as to when it is with propranolol... if anybody can help me here,,....and isnt there like a betablocker that is partial, or that like when it goes out of control, it kicks into effect...like some sort of an anti-hulk thing,, instead of busrting, it kicks and it dosent tip over.. that would be awesome... :teeth DH
Beta blockers only work on physical signs of fight or flight, not mental and so I too found that my head was still going crazy although I looked fine. I had a huge presentation to the entire company at work in May and I got through it!! Instead of using just beta blockers I also took 2 Kalms, 3 times a day for the whole week before. They are completely herbal and work to reassure you mentally. With beta blockers they really helped me. I also found my stomach was really off which makes my anxiety worse so I took an Imodium tablet an hour before the presentation too. I would say these 3 in combination reduced my anxiety by about 80% in comparison to being completely I controllable before.
 
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