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I've always had issues with school and planning for my future. I've been in college twice now because of a knee jerk reaction to the idea "you need to do something. If you got to school, then things will just fall into place." This was especially how it was the first time. I already know what I want to do with my life, but I just want something to insure financial stability before I do that first.

Both then and now, I've don't have anyone to go to help me develop a solid plan. I couldn't really go to my family and the career counselors at the college I went to didn't have anything to offer other than the information you'd get from the booklets they send out on request.

I'm in my mid twenties now and I really want to focus on getting my life together. I been working on improving my mental health and I've got a lot more resources to help with that. But nothing for finding help for things like what career could be a good fit, what programs I could sign up for, that kinda of thing. I'm really nervous and I just feel lost.

If any of you where in a similar situation, what did you do? And if you have any advice, I'd love to hear it.
 
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When you say college, is it like university? Because if so, you would have chosen the type of studies that interested you already. From then on for most people the route is: finish studying -> look for a job in your field -> fail, find a job in a different field. That's how it works for my fellow humanities graduates. For other kinds of graduates it's more like finish studying -> find a job in your field -> realise you hate what you're doing, have a breakdown and find a job in a different field.

You can also look up graduate schemes in your field by searching for them on the internet.

And here's something to help/hinder in your search:
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I'm thinking a lot about my future too at the moment. Specifically whether I should apply for a postgraduate programme in urban design and city planning. Social anxiety and uncertainty about whether I'd find a job I really enjoyed in the field have been putting me off. But I am interested in the subject and feel there might be opportunities there somewhere that allow me to find a fulfilling line of work. I dunno.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When you say college, is it like university? Because if so, you would have chosen the type of studies that interested you already. From then on for most people the route is: finish studying -> look for a job in your field -> fail, find a job in a different field. That's how it works for my fellow humanities graduates. For other kinds of graduates it's more like finish studying -> find a job in your field -> realise you hate what you're doing, have a breakdown and find a job in a different field.

You can also look up graduate schemes in your field by searching for them on the internet.

And here's something to help/hinder in your search:
View attachment 148902
I understand what you mean. But university isn't really an option as of now due to how expensive it'd be. The last time I took classes was for a certification program at a community college in my city. I enrolled after talking it over with academic advisors and a career counselor. Then a teacher explains that I'd need to go to university in order to get a job in that field of work (In this case web development).

I did do my research and I did ask a lot of questions, especially "will I be able to find work with this program alone?" and was told yes by everyone I asked before enrolling. At the end of the day, it was my fault for acting on impulse. And I know that getting into a career requires trial and error, but I just want to make sure that it's not for nothing before I make that commitment. I'm not expecting to join the workforce upon completion, I just want be sure that I meet the necessary requirements of whatever I'm working towards.

I'm currently looking into training programs in my area. Thanks for your input, it's solid advice and I'm sure it'll help me once I have a few more things figured out.

Stay safe
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm thinking a lot about my future too at the moment. Specifically whether I should apply for a postgraduate programme in urban design and city planning. Social anxiety and uncertainty about whether I'd find a job I really enjoyed in the field have been putting me off. But I am interested in the subject and feel there might be opportunities there somewhere that allow me to find a fulfilling line of work. I dunno.
I really hope things work out for you, Pechorin.
 
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I've always had issues with school and planning for my future. I've been in college twice now because of a knee jerk reaction to the idea "you need to do something. If you got to school, then things will just fall into place." This was especially how it was the first time. I already know what I want to do with my life, but I just want something to insure financial stability before I do that first.

Both then and now, I've don't have anyone to go to help me develop a solid plan. I couldn't really go to my family and the career counselors at the college I went to didn't have anything to offer other than the information you'd get from the booklets they send out on request.

I'm in my mid twenties now and I really want to focus on getting my life together. I been working on improving my mental health and I've got a lot more resources to help with that. But nothing for finding help for things like what career could be a good fit, what programs I could sign up for, that kinda of thing. I'm really nervous and I just feel lost.

If any of you where in a similar situation, what did you do? And if you have any advice, I'd love to hear it.
Hey :) First of all, I think your issue with planning for the future is a unfortunately common one. I wish they gave a bit more attention to careers counsellors and advisers at school, but that's an aside. It's great that you went to visit them anyways, those booklets aren't everything but they are a starting point.

Just for clarity, you mention that you know what you want to do with life - do you mean like a life goal or purpose? What is this goal? I think this might be helpful in deciding what path to take.

Career choices can be difficult, but there are a few things to consider. First of all, consider your skills and interests. What are you good at? What do you like to do? Or alternatively, what are you bad at? What do you hate to do? Start to write these down, so you're more aware of what you can leverage. Secondly, you might want to consider practicalities. Can you drive? If not, then you might want to pick a place that's closer by. How much are your expenses? You'll want to aim for a wage that covers that and leaves a bit extra to save. Once you have these two considered, you have enough to start exploring. This can be exploring the internet, like LinkedIn and Meetup, to see what roles are out there. You could talk to friends and family to see what they're up to, and maybe they could help you if you ask their advice. More and more people are uploading snippets of their work lifestyles onto YouTube, so that can give some insight.

Of course, there's the next steps like interviews, CVs, applications etc, but that comes later. Right now, the priority is figure out a couple of career path options that you could try out. Like I said above, career choices can be difficult, and it's okay to not get it right first time. Most people switch jobs throughout their lives, so it's quite common. But don't let the fear of choosing a non-optimal path stop you from choosing any path. Best of luck - I'm always happy to chat over PM if you'd like on this :)
 

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I understand what you mean. But university isn't really an option as of now due to how expensive it'd be. The last time I took classes was for a certification program at a community college in my city. I enrolled after talking it over with academic advisors and a career counselor. Then a teacher explains that I'd need to go to university in order to get a job in that field of work (In this case web development).

I did do my research and I did ask a lot of questions, especially "will I be able to find work with this program alone?" and was told yes by everyone I asked before enrolling. At the end of the day, it was my fault for acting on impulse. And I know that getting into a career requires trial and error, but I just want to make sure that it's not for nothing before I make that commitment. I'm not expecting to join the workforce upon completion, I just want be sure that I meet the necessary requirements of whatever I'm working towards.

I'm currently looking into training programs in my area. Thanks for your input, it's solid advice and I'm sure it'll help me once I have a few more things figured out.

Stay safe
Hey @CoffeeCat I think you misunderstood me. I wasn't recommending university! In fact, if I lived in the U.S. I probably wouldn't go to one. I merely was trying to understand what college is, I thought maybe it's a uni by another name.

Tbh, if web development is what you're after, I think you've received poor advice. It's a fast-developing field and universities aren't always nimble enough to keep up with it. My brother is in webdev and he dropped out of uni because he wasn't getting anything useful out of it. He studied by himself and now has a successful business. To take another piece of anecdotal evidence, a friend of mine left university with a master's degree and an entry into a lucrative career, hated it, instead enrolled into a technical college (probably similar to what you're attending) to learn programming and loves her current job.

I see no reason why you couldn't get a job once you're certified. Looking for jobs is hard nowadays and the application process is often depressing but there are lots of remote jobs thanks to the pandemic.
 
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