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These are chemicals that posess the effects of benzos, yet arnt related at all. That in itself is a breakthrough. They are also coming up with new drugs (I think) that are like Ambien(or just benzos), but don't posess much sedative or amenesic properties. thats kind of amazing. I didnt even know this till today.
I took an ambien and it kind of makes me feel good. Not even that tired.
 

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Yea I heard of such drugs. Ambien is one. So is lunesta. I remember a drug that was suppose to be meant for anxiety with low infinity for somnolence called ocinaplon but I think it might have failed the clinical trials. They have the same mechanism as benzos.

But yea, I can relate to your experience with ambien. That stuff used to make me goofy when I took it. Like I would get a warm fuzzy feeling in my stomach, no anxiety, and everything seemed ten times more funny then it really was, especially tv shows. Haha, I really didn't know what was going on, but I remember liking it a lot.
 

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Ambien used to be fun, then it was just a sleep drug, but now it does nothing at all. When I had severe insomnia I took 7 pills within 3 or 4 hours and still watched DVD without any real effect.
 

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Ambien, Lunesta and the "Z" drugs are essentially the same thing as benzos. I don't have problems with sleep but on the odd occasions I've taken Ambien it doesn't help me fall asleep. It does however keep me knocked out for 5 hours which is a godsend when I'm travelling for work and need to be functional early the next morning.
 

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Ambien, Lunesta and the "Z" drugs are essentially the same thing as benzos.
I wouldn't say they are essentially the same as benzodiazepines as they act somewhat different and have therefore been named nonbenzodiazepines. ;)
 

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I wouldn't say they are essentially the same as benzodiazepines as they act somewhat different and have therefore been named nonbenzodiazepines. ;)
They can call them whatever they want but they are essentially short acting hypnotic benzos. The difference comes down to marketing mostly. After demonizing benzos when they went off patent big pharma had to come up with a creative way to sell their newly patented benzo-like drugs.
 

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They can call them whatever they want but they are essentially short acting hypnotic benzos.
Only about half the nonbenzodiazepine class have hypnotic properties.

...The difference comes down to marketing mostly. After demonizing benzos when they went off patent big pharma had to come up with a creative way to sell their newly patented benzo-like drugs.
They share many effects with benzodiazepines since most act primarily as agonists at the GABA-A alpha subtype receptors. This however pretty much limits their similarities in general, since nonbenzodiazepines bind to more GABA-A subtype receptors that can produce effects such as visual hallucinations and more, when activated.
 

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Only about half the nonbenzodiazepine class have hypnotic properties.
I was referring specifically to "Z" sleep drugs.

They share many effects with benzodiazepines since most act primarily as agonists at the GABA-A alpha subtype receptors. This however pretty much limits their similarities in general, since nonbenzodiazepines bind to more GABA-A subtype receptors that can produce effects such as visual hallucinations and more, when activated.
I'm not going to argue the pharmacology, after all Lexapro can be argued to be a completely different drug than Paxil. But the "Z" sleep drugs have been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use these drugs as anxiolytics since they are so potent.
 

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I'm not going to argue the pharmacology, after all Lexapro can be argued to be a completely different drug than Paxil.
That's a completely different story: Both Paxil and Lexapro are in the same class of medications because they share the same main mechanism of action (selectively inhibiting the reuptake of serotonin). They are therefore both called Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors. Benzodiazepines and Nonbenzodiazepines are not in the same class of medications.

But the "Z" sleep drugs have been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use these drugs as anxiolytics since they are so potent.
Alcohol has been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use alcohol as an anxiolytic since it is so 'potent'.

Actually alcohol is cross-tolerant to benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepines; many alcoholics abuse those drugs and benzos are being used for treating alcohol withdrawal.

Can we conclude now that alcohol is "essentially the same thing as benzos or Z-drugs"? NO, we can't. Because alcohol works differently than those drugs and has a completely different chemical structure.

In the example above you can substitute alcohol for many hypnotics.

While zolpidem is a hypnotic agent with a chemical structure unrelated to benzodiazepines, barbiturates, or other drugs with known hypnotic properties, it interacts with a GABA-BZ receptor complex and shares some of the pharmacological properties of the benzodiazepines.
In contrast to the benzodiazepines, which nonselectively bind to and activate all omega receptor subtypes, zolpidem in vitro binds the (1) receptor preferentially with a high affinity ratio of the alpha1/alpha5 subunits. The (1) receptor is found primarily on the Lamina IV of the sensorimotor cortical regions, substantia ***** (pars reticulata), cerebellum molecular layer, olfactory bulb, ventral thalamic complex, pons, inferior colliculus, and globus pallidus. This selective binding of zolpidem on the (1) receptor is not absolute, but it may explain the relative absence of myorelaxant and anticonvulsant effects in animal studies as well as the preservation of deep sleep (stages 3 and 4) in human studies of zolpidem at hypnotic doses.
 

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Th
In the example above you can substitute alcohol for many hypnotics.
Not at all, alcohol would have to be consumed in huge quantities daily to cause physical withdrawal and the withdrawal lasts a much shorter period of time. Benzos and sleeping pills do not, they just require regular use, and the withdrawal symptoms can last for months. These sleeping drugs have very similar withdrawal symptoms to benzos. I think they are very similar to benzos despite them being marketed as being completely safe, and non addictive. Remarkable what patent protection will do eh?

AMBIEN CR is non-narcotic, and can be taken for as long a time period as your doctor recommends.

When was the last time you heard a pharmaceutical company say that about a benzo?
 

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Benzodiazepines and Nonbenzodiazepines are not "essentially the same". They are chemically unrelated and share just some of their pharmacological properties.

There exist other hypnotics which are chemically unrelated to benzodiazepines and share some of their pharmacological properties. But nobody can tell me they are "essentially the same as benzodiazepines".

And those hypnotics have been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use / used these drugs as anxiolytics since they are so potent. These sleeping drugs have very similar withdrawal symptoms to benzos and those symptoms can last for months.
 

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Equilibrian Epicurius
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Alcohol has been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use alcohol as an anxiolytic since it is so 'potent'.

Actually alcohol is cross-tolerant to benzodiazepines and nonbenzodiazepines; many alcoholics abuse those drugs and benzos are being used for treating alcohol withdrawal.

Can we conclude now that alcohol is "essentially the same thing as benzos or Z-drugs"? NO, we can't. Because alcohol works differently than those drugs and has a completely different chemical structure.
:clap

...But the "Z" sleep drugs have been shown to be remarkably similar to benzos in the following ways:

1) Potential for abuse
2) Recreational use
3) Difficulty in withdrawaling with regular use

Also, some people use these drugs as anxiolytics since they are so potent.
Congratulations, you just correlated the Z-drugs with benzodiazepines using 3 or 4 umbrella points! :no Well, here are a few specific differences:

1) Z-drugs can cause hallucinations.
2) Z-drugs preferentially bind to the omega(1) receptor subtype, whereas hypnotic benzodiazepines are unselective to omega(1) and (2). This reduces the adverse effects on cognitive functioning during daytime for the former.
3) Benzodiazepines exert much more balanced sedative and amnestic properties as well as anxiolytic ones. The Z-drugs are primarily sedative and are much less anxiolytic than benzos.
4) Z-drugs at therapeutic doses do not provide efficacious anticonvulsant properties.
 

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This will be my last post here, I'm not here to aruge pharmacology since I'm not qualified to do so. This is the point I was trying to make about the Z drugs versus benzos:

In a previous study it was shown that perceptions of GPs towards hypnotics tended to be in favour of newer hypnotics despite a lack of evidence showing benefit of newer Z drugs compared to benzodiazepines...Although Z drugs have been promoted as being effective and safe, and compared favourably with benzodiazepines in terms of side-effect profile and dependence, these findings are not supported in this study. Reported rates of adverse reactions to Z drugs were similar in nature and incidence to benzodiazepines in responders, and comparable with the findings of other studies...
 
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