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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(Long post but it's worth reading it imo)

Ok so lately I have suspected I have some sort of intolerance because for several years now I have had some problems I never used to have in the past. To name a few - every so often a sharp horrible pain in my stomach, being more bloated, having to visit the bathroom more frequently, experiencing heart arrytmia/mild tachycardia after meals (especially when eating food made out of wheat, that is rich in gluten) and a number of other symptoms.

Because all of these symptoms are common for gluten intolerance and because I have noticed on multiple occasions they get worse when eating food with high gluten content, I've decided to try a gluten free diet. Not only in hopes of improving or getting rid of the physical symptoms but also in hopes it will benefit my mental condition.

I don't know if all of the following is true for all types of gluten intolerance as the research has mainly been done on celiac disease (which is a more serious form of gluten intolerance) but - celiac disease has been linked many times to anxiety and depression just to mention a few disorders. Studies has indicated that individuals with celiac disease are much more prone to suffering with social phobia than individuals without it. Studies has also indicated that individuals with celiac disease in combination with mental disorders often greatly benefits from being on a gluten free diet with symptoms of the mental disorder diminishing or even completely disappearing in some cases.

It makes sense to me if it would be helpful for individuals with a milder variant of gluten intolerance too. So a few days ago I started out my experiment. I replaced the bread I eat with a gluten free one. I bought unprocessed meat and fish to eat for dinner. I'm sticking strictly with potatoes and rice for meals as pasta contains gluten. This is pretty much all I changed so far cause I don't think I need to be on a 100% gluten free diet to see any improvements and also, I've been a big eater of white bread, pasta etc so just cutting them should make a difference if I have gluten intolerance.

Let me tell you all that so far, this experiment is going better than I could have imagined. My stomach is calm for the first time in ages. I'm back to the regular bathroom routine and I don't feel/get bloated anymore. These first days after meals I have no longer gotten heart arrytmias or a very increased heart rate either. But the most interesting and encouraging part is that my anxiety has dipped dramatically. Normally if i was to use a scale from 1-10 I would say I am an 7 or 8/10. After the day I started this diet, I have been a 2/10 max as far as anxiety goes. I even find it hard to believe myself. I can think of the most dreadful anxiety causing things and hardly feel a tingle in my stomach, whereas before it would really have gotten me all worked up. I hardly felt anxious whatsoever when I went outside around people the last couple of times.

Of course it's too early to say if it is a temporary thing, if my belief in this/placebo is causing parts of the effect and so on. I will continue to be on this diet for at least a month and see where that gets me. Shouldn't get the hopes up too much. But things are looking very promising. I hope that you guys will follow this experiment and I also hope you won't just discredit all of this. I know how I used to think about things like this - 'oh that's not for me, how could a change of diet help me, I'm just seriously messed up in the head' and so on. But as I said there has been many links between gluten intolerance and anxiety/social anxiety.

1 out of 100 people has celiac disease and many more probably has some sort of sensitivity to gluten. Many are undiagnosed. Among these, social anxiety is much more common than in people without it. Thus it seems very likely that a fair share of the members on here could be affected by this and could possibly benefit from putting themselves on a gluten free diet. You have nothing to lose by trying this. With that said, of course there will also be people with gluten intolerance & social anxiety that will not benefit from it or noticing any difference.

I will keep you guys posted on how I am doing! Keep your fingers crossed for me.
 

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자신을 사랑 해
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Yes, please keep us posted. I've been meaning to try this too. But I love everything that contains gluten SO MUCH.
 

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Fighting demons!
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The link between celiac disease and social anxiety is nonsensical. Does it mean everyone on this forum has celiac disease? Does it mean everyone who has celiac disease has social anxiety? No. Maybe invidiuals with celiac disease have anxiety but not social anxiety two different kinds of anxiety.
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, please keep us posted. I've been meaning to try this too. But I love everything that contains gluten SO MUCH.
Sure I will do. You should definitely give it a go - I don't really like the idea of having to stop eating everything that contains gluten either but if it would be beneficial for me, I would definitely do it.

The link between celiac disease and social anxiety is nonsensical. Does it mean everyone on this forum has celiac disease? Does it mean everyone who has celiac disease has social anxiety? No. Maybe invidiuals with celiac disease have anxiety but not social anxiety two different kinds of anxiety.
No it does not mean that and no such claims has been made if you read through my post. If you are going to dismiss all links as nonsensical based on the fact that there isn't a direct link existing in all cases, you are going to have to dismiss a lot, for instance the link between medications and various side effects as all side effects do not occur in all people taking the medication.

I am aware of at least one study that clearly shows a much higher prevalence of social anxiety in people suffering with CD compared with the healthy control group. Not just anxiety. Obviously more studies are required to further examine and verify this link but this is also why I wrote 'studies has indicated...' instead of saying they have definitely proofed it is so. However that various types of mental disorders has a high prevalence among CD patients and that their condition often improves when not consuming gluten anymore is pretty much beyond doubt.
 

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Pastry Case
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Hi zoslow. I have been on a weight-loss diet for 3mths and a few weeks back seemed to hit a bit of a plateau. I decided to shake things up a bit and make them more interesting by making every alternate day a gluten-free day. Today has been one such day and the main thing I've noticed is the absence of bloating, plus, I feel very noticeably lighter.

Good luck with your experiment.

Forgot to say: the S.A. that coeliac sufferers have may be caused solely by having to deal with the symptoms they have such as diarrhoea, vomiting, excessive wind and abdominal cramps/pains. That's enough to make anyone anxious when in company, I think!
 

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A very interesting post; thank you!

Even if you totally dismiss any connection between CD and social anxiety, there are still so many benefits to going gluten-free that it really makes sense to at least give the diet a try.

As an example, the tennis player Novac Djokovic went from being a perennial second-place finisher to both Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal before going 70-6 in matches while winning 3 of the 4 major championships in 2011 - an incredible record for which he heavily credits his switching to a gluten-free diet. Google it.

But make no mistake, just as laysiaj said above, anything as fundamental as a change in diet will be difficult at first. What form of personal growth doesn't require some self-effort and sacrifice? If you're waiting for ice cream to taste worse than broccoli before you decide to make a change, I wish you luck.

Everyone has a choice. Which do we want more:

1.) The potential peace of decreased anxiety (along with many the other well-documented benefits of a gluten-free diet), or:

2.) The ability to eat everything we want, with a guarantee that things will not get any better?

Personally, if I'm drowning in suffering and somebody throws me a potential life preserver, I'm not about to complain if I don't like the color. Best of luck to everyone!
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi zoslow. I have been on a weight-loss diet for 3mths and a few weeks back seemed to hit a bit of a plateau. I decided to shake things up a bit and make them more interesting by making every alternate day a gluten-free day. Today has been one such day and the main thing I've noticed is the absence of bloating, plus, I feel very noticeably lighter.

Good luck with your experiment.

Forgot to say: the S.A. that coeliac sufferers have may be caused solely by having to deal with the symptoms they have such as diarrhoea, vomiting, excessive wind and abdominal cramps/pains. That's enough to make anyone anxious when in company, I think!
Thank you!

I concur with the feeling lighter part. I have experienced that feeling too... glad to hear your weightloss is going well as I'm guessing you made some progress in 3 months time, it's not always easy sticking with it but when you do it is worth the effort.

You raise an important point and you may very well be right that it is at least partly the cause of it. I don't know really. I realize of course that the theory I have is not that well founded scientifically but then again I also think it comes down to basics. Intolerances and allergies can cause a lot of different symptoms in people when the body reacts to them.

A very interesting post; thank you!

Even if you totally dismiss any connection between CD and social anxiety, there are still so many benefits to going gluten-free that it really makes sense to at least give the diet a try.

As an example, the tennis player Novac Djokovic went from being a perennial second-place finisher to both Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal before going 70-6 in matches while winning 3 of the 4 major championships in 2011 - an incredible record for which he heavily credits his switching to a gluten-free diet. Google it.

But make no mistake, just as laysiaj said above, anything as fundamental as a change in diet will be difficult at first. What form of personal growth doesn't require some self-effort and sacrifice? If you're waiting for ice cream to taste worse than broccoli before you decide to make a change, I wish you luck.

Everyone has a choice. Which do we want more:

1.) The potential peace of decreased anxiety (along with many the other well-documented benefits of a gluten-free diet), or:

2.) The ability to eat everything we want, with a guarantee that things will not get any better?

Personally, if I'm drowning in suffering and somebody throws me a potential life preserver, I'm not about to complain if I don't like the color. Best of luck to everyone!
I didn't know that about Novac Djokovic, I am going to look into it. Thanks for the info!

Yes I completely agree. That is how I see it - at least to me this isn't such a big commitment. Of course it is going to take some work and some eating things that I don't really enjoy but if it helps me, I'd much rather do that for the rest of my life than be like I am now. The physical benefits alone makes it worth it. A lot of people gladly pops strong medication that they don't really know how it affects their bodies and comes with a lot of side effects but they aren't willing to put in a little effort on trying something more natural. That seems crazy to me. Not that I am against medication in any way but I don't see the harm in trying other things.

Since you seem rather positive to this and know some about it I take it you are on a gluten free diet yourself? How do you feel it effects you?
 

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I'm eating bread while I read this.

Hm, my stomach has been bloated for months, I don't know why. I cut out sodas and pepper years ago. Cut out eggs and hot sauce for a month, cut down on carbs. No improvement.
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm eating bread while I read this.

Hm, my stomach has been bloated for months, I don't know why. I cut out sodas and pepper years ago. Cut out eggs and hot sauce for a month, cut down on carbs. No improvement.
Depending on if you eat white bread you might at least want to switch to a.. not sure what the word is in english but a darker bread you know? As much as I like a lot of white breads I think they are pretty awful generally speaking for your body.

I'm on day 4 now of my diet and today I'm feeling pretty much as I did yesterday. Relaxed. It currently seems as if my mood is slowly elevating. Not that I have been depressed or anything before but hey.. it's hard to be all happy and bubbly when you are in my shoes. I currently feel more carefree and playful than normally if that makes sense. Very eager to see if there are any further improvements once I hit the one week mark. I make sure to get daily vitamin/mineral supplements too.
 

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Pastry Case
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I'm eating bread while I read this.

Hm, my stomach has been bloated for months, I don't know why. I cut out sodas and pepper years ago. Cut out eggs and hot sauce for a month, cut down on carbs. No improvement.
Have you tried eliminating all dairy products for a while? Or making your diet sugar-free?
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Day 6

I have stuck with the diet except for one time when I ended up having no gluten free food at home so had to eat a slice of regular bread and some other things with gluten in it. I noticed that roughly an hour later or so I felt much more alert and agitated. Clearly I don't react well to it.

I have noticed both pro's and cons with this diet so far. The cons are that I feel a bit more dimheaded and not so concentrated (I'm hoping this is temporary as my body readjusts to the new diet). I have also felt more tired in the morning and slept in. But the benefits greatly outweigh these downsides. The way I feel it is as if someone flicked a switch inside me. Anxiety off. I have hardly experienced any anxiety whatsoever. Compared to the way I've been, I've felt so normal that I just can't help smiling every other minute or so and think about how good this feels.

I will try to describe the difference when I am around people: Normally I'm always very aware of my body. How I look, what I say, movements I do and so on. It is as if my body and mind are two separate parts and my mind constantly worries what my body is up to. This feeling has diminished to the point where I feel as if I am one. The self-consciousness is pretty much gone and my mind no longer being diverted, I can focus on the things around me. And usually I avoid interactions when possible cause of the anxiety and stress. Now I feel a lot more curious, wanting to speak to people. To put myself out there. I don't feel that irrational fear no more for perfectly natural things such as being around people or speaking to other people.

I'm afraid each morning I wake up there will be a terrible backlash. I'm prepared it it comes. But damn this feels good and considering a lot of peoples conditions seems to improve given time on the diet, considering I'm only 6 days in, this seems extremely promising. If this continues I very well see myself doing a whole bunch of things I haven't done for many years in the coming months.
 

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I haven't read everything you wrote, but I know a guy that recently got that celiac disease (he is in 20s). So he started to eat things without gluten, but honestly I am a little worried for him since he started to look shockingly skinny. Last year I saw him on the beach and he looked like skeleton. Idk how much you weight but be careful of that. that you eat enough of food that will maybe supplement what he might be lacking and therefore lose so much weight
 

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Few notes. Bloating and stomach problems do not always mean gluten intolerance. If you are sensitive to gluten, it may show in your skin such as rashes or blotchy spots. Also inflammation in joints. If you are sensitive to gluten then it may take several weeks to rid your body of it. After atleast 2 or 3 weeks of being gluten free, if you think you are feeling better, are you going to reintroduce gluten? That's the real part of the test. I think in general, most people do feel better after eliminating a lot of unhealthy foods, but are you sure it's gluten and are you willing to reintroduce it to see if you are sensitive?
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I haven't read everything you wrote, but I know a guy that recently got that celiac disease (he is in 20s). So he started to eat things without gluten, but honestly I am a little worried for him since he started to look shockingly skinny. Last year I saw him on the beach and he looked like skeleton. Idk how much you weight but be careful of that. that you eat enough of food that will maybe supplement what he might be lacking and therefore lose so much weight
Thanks for the concern and information :) I do think it can be a problem because there are so many things with gluten in it I can't eat... the store where I buy food isn't so well stacked so I have a hard time getting enough food home that fits my diet. I have been eating less this week. But I think by perhaps adding a lunch consisting of fish or meat (I often skip lunch) and adding more fruits and vegetables I can get enough nutrition. Right now it's no danger with my weight but I was already losing some weight before I started the diet so I guess given some months I could lose a lot if I don't watch out.

Few notes. Bloating and stomach problems do not always mean gluten intolerance. If you are sensitive to gluten, it may show in your skin such as rashes or blotchy spots. Also inflammation in joints. If you are sensitive to gluten then it may take several weeks to rid your body of it. After atleast 2 or 3 weeks of being gluten free, if you think you are feeling better, are you going to reintroduce gluten? That's the real part of the test. I think in general, most people do feel better after eliminating a lot of unhealthy foods, but are you sure it's gluten and are you willing to reintroduce it to see if you are sensitive?
That's true. I haven't had any inflammations but I have noticed rashes on my skin but not connected it to this. Yeah I'm thinking that I will reintroduce gluten in the near future to really see if that is what I'm reacting to cause obviously I don't want to spend time and money avoiding it if I don't have to. I feel fairly certain it is indeed a gluten intolerance I have given the very positive change once I stopped eating it but of course your suggested theory is also a possibility.
 

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Day 6

I'm afraid each morning I wake up there will be a terrible backlash. I'm prepared it it comes. But damn this feels good and considering a lot of peoples conditions seems to improve given time on the diet, considering I'm only 6 days in, this seems extremely promising. If this continues I very well see myself doing a whole bunch of things I haven't done for many years in the coming months.
Hahaha this is exactly how I feel about my niacin therapy. I'm afraid I'll just backlash. A lot of my anxiety right now comes from being worried about that lol. As for the rest of your post, it's a VERY encouraging read. Gluten diet or not, I think MANY mood issues have to do with diet.

It seems that people (like a few on here) are real repulsive towards the idea. They seem to separate mood disorders or mental illnesses from diet and physical factors which we have control over. I beg to differ after experiencing the progress I have in the last few weeks, and reading your story.

Keep us posted on your progress!
 

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To anyone who is on a gluten free diet or considering going gluten free I hope I can make a contribution to the whole debate that goes on regarding its efficacy. In my experience, the reason why so many people have benefited from gluten free diet is not because gluten is bad but the modern methods of growing wheat are harmful. The bread your grandparents ate is not the same as the bread your are eating today. Wheat has been altered significantly through genetic modification, hybridization, pesticides and additives that it has become a big problem for pretty much everyone to digest. Most people might tell you they have a gluten sensitivity but I'd say more often than not, it's a wheat intolerance.

Wheat that isn't properly metabolized by the body causes lots of inflammation in the gut that reduces the digestive power of your body. Since the body isn't digesting the wheat properly it is possible that increases in anxiety arise because inflammation is very stimulating to the nervous system due to the stress response it causes. This sets you up for problems in sensitive individuals and since all of you guys already experience social anxiety, depression, etc., a weakened digestive system would reduce the amount of serotonin production.

I recommend that people remove/reduce wheat consumption unless it's from an organic source. There are some brands that bake organic bread with bacterial cultures as well to ease its digestion and make it safer for consumption.

Hope that helps!
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hahaha this is exactly how I feel about my niacin therapy. I'm afraid I'll just backlash. A lot of my anxiety right now comes from being worried about that lol. As for the rest of your post, it's a VERY encouraging read. Gluten diet or not, I think MANY mood issues have to do with diet.

It seems that people (like a few on here) are real repulsive towards the idea. They seem to separate mood disorders or mental illnesses from diet and physical factors which we have control over. I beg to differ after experiencing the progress I have in the last few weeks, and reading your story.
God yeah. I'm just afraid of starting to feel worse all the time. Actually I didn't feel that great today but I'm fairly certain part of it could be because it's a very very hot day and I didn't get a lot of sleep last night. Need to catch up...

I agree with what you are saying. Perhaps for some people a change of diet seems too petty.. or in some cases like too much work. But seriously considering what we have to gain by trying different alternatives and how awful SA is, I don't understand why some people are so reluctant. If I had the money I would try a lot more products and herbs for one thing.

Long informative post
Thank you for taking the time to write that post! I really appreciate it. You could be on to something and I will keep it in mind once I try going off this diet to see how it affects me, perhaps I'll try just removing wheat the next time and see what it does for me.
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Day 9

Still going strong. I have now been very careful to not even eat food with trace amounts of gluten just to stay on the safe side. It means a more limited diet but I still make things go around by keeping some food I enjoy and replacing other that I can't eat on this diet.

I have overall felt good after the small relapse I mentioned some days ago. The anxiety is much much less noticeable. Especially the physical anxiety, I do find from time to time that the mental anxiety can go a little up and down. Today as I saw a girl I had a crush on for a while, I first thought if I should avoid her like I usually do. Then I said screw it and walked up to her, said hi and exchanged a few words before I was on my way. It felt good. A tingle in my stomach but no actual fear.

Physically speaking, aside from feeling less anxious and tense, I am also noticing other improvements. One being that the blotches I had on my chest for several years now has started disappearing. In roughly 5 days time I estimate they have shrunk by like 80% and are hardly even visible anymore. Also no more outbreaks of acne in my face. This I do not know if it is related to the diet seeing as I don't get acne very often these days but I had a few outbreaks just shortly before starting the diet so could be related or maybe not, I'm yet to see that. My stomach is still working very well - no more feeling bloated or gassy.
 

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Master of my domain
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Placebo of peace.
You amuse me. You are yet to respond to my earlier post in this topic and it's quite clear why you haven't responded (you are incapable of doing so). I'm gonna give you one more chance. Here are a few studies for you. Read them and then if you still want to claim there is no connection or it's all placebo, post studies supporting your theory. Or be quiet. You have no credibility on these forums and no one takes you seriously. What is the miracle medication of today? Magnesium oil? Zoloft? Nardil? Iodine? Rhodiola rosea? Everyday you are spamming about another one. And considering how extremely rude and unsupportful you have been towards some members, even taking pleasure in their misery and laughing at the fact they have not recovered, it is a mystery to me why you are still not banned. How can one person sink so low?

Studies

Social phobia in coeliac disease.
Addolorato G, Mirijello A, D'Angelo C, Leggio L, Ferrulli A, Vonghia L, Cardone S, Leso V, Miceli A, Gasbarrini G.

Anxiety but not depression decreases in coeliac patients after one-year gluten-free diet: a longitudinal study.
Addolorato G. et al. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology. 2001 May;36(5):502-6.

Now I'm waiting, where is your research that makes you call it placebo? Show me.
 
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