Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Read this if you have a chance:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/alvaro-fernandez/study-meditation-against_b_103534.html

It is about a study focusing on meditation for ADHD patients, but it also points to the fact that anxiety and depression decreased in the adults who volunteered to be in the study.

Here is how mindfulness meditation goes:
1. Sit in a comfortable position (cross-legged if you can)
2. Close your eyes
3. Start paying attention to your breath, as it goes in and out of the nose
4. What will happen is your mind will start wandering (random thoughts flowing in and out of the mind). When this happen, acknowledge the thought, but do it in a gently and friendly way (don't react to the thought by getting upset). After you gently acknowledge the thought, re-focus your attention to the breath.
5. Start trying to pay attention to the breath, as it goes in through the nostrils, fills the lungs, and as it expels out through the nostrils.
6. Your mind will start to drift soon; this is okay. Just gently bring it back to the breath.
7. Continue this meditative process for about 15-20 minutes a day.
8. Throughout your day, whenever you get upset or anxious, rather than letting the negative emotions overtake you, just acknowledge them, but without reacting to them. Become mindful of the emotion. You are not training your brain to re-wire the way it works so your negative symptoms go down.

To give you an example: You become anxious about how someone reacted to something you said. Rather than ruminating on this and allowing the anxiety to build up, what you do is you pause, and you start "looking" at the anxious thought. You come to see that all it is is a thought. All it is is brain cells firing away in a certain part of the brain. Inherently, the emotion is not good nor bad, and the negative emotion is not an accurate reflection of reality. It is just a small hiccup in your brain chemistry. Notice the bad feeling, but do not see it as bad. Just pretend you are looking at the negative thought like an audience member watches a movie. Since the audience member is not in the movie, he does not have to be scared or truly upset when something dangerous happens in the movie.

Give it a shot - studies show that after 8 weeks (~3 hours a week), people create shifts in their brain patterns and they report how they subjectively feel better as well.

Good luck and post if you have any questions in case something doesn't really make sense. :yes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
487 Posts
I want to give meditation another shot because it seems to be recommended everywhere I look. I managed to do 10 minutes a night for a week once. It's hard to do when there's people walking around all hours of the day and night in the house though.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top