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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the etymology of the G notation in Set Theory?
You know, set theory, that theory people had in high school that concerned Venn diagrams, collections and sub collections.

In other words, what does 'G' stand for?

I know that 'U' (the 'supercollection'/('population' in statistics)) stands for 'Universum' (Latin) in P(G), but what does 'G' (the subset of 'U') stand for?

Illustration:



G has a Latin name tied to it, but I don't know which one.

I am going to search some more online if I can find an answer.
Meanwhile, I'd like to know if anyone has an answer to this. :)
 

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Are you sure it stands for something? It could really be any letter (often S, for example).

If this set theory is part of an intro to abstract algebra, then maybe an author would use G, since that's the convention for sets in Group theory.
 

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I'm pretty sure you're wrong, it just means group. No latin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Then I suppose my colleague might have been wrong - even though he told me it has a Latin origin and he took his first year major in advanced mathematics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Are you sure it stands for something? It could really be any letter (often S, for example).

If this set theory is part of an intro to abstract algebra, then maybe an author would use G, since that's the convention for sets in Group theory.
It might be the convention, but it surely has an explanation to it.

The G(roup) version might make sense.
I found this:

Etymology
From French groupe ("cluster, group"), from Italian gruppo groppo ("a knot, heap, group, bag (of money)"), itself derived from Vulgar Latin *kruppo
source: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/group

I shall further investigate this until I get to the beginning of time, the reason why we exist and further: the possibility of multiverses and 0-dimensional hyperspaces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Please do confirm that Something is like there "G" As i searched there is nothing about G
How many hours did you search? I'm currently too busy studying Statistics 101, but I'll get into the whole G-research when I have the time.

A math major I know told me he is 99% sure that G comes from a Latin background, as well as each and every symbol in Set Theory.
 
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