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Confused
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I often feel that if a meteor was going to hit earth in 3 days, for example, my SAD would disappear. The fact that something massive is happening would put my fear of people into perspective. Obviously there'd be massive human suffering in such an event, and tremendous amounts of anxiety would be present, but I believe my SAD would not be present at all — as other issues would be higher up on the agenda. Sometimes when I look at an approaching thunder-storm, and feel the power of nature, of the universe, my anxiety seems to disappear. When I feel the this 'greatness' of the nature, my SAD disappears in an instant.

I don't mean to excuse events that cause massive human suffering; I merely mean to explain that these types of events would greatly eliminate SAD. For me, these massive events, or any life-changing events, put my SAD into perspective. Something needs to override the SAD; something needs to become more prevalent than the SAD. Perhaps I'm alone with this feeling. Anyway, feel free to comment.
 

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Starlight and moonbeams
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Someone made a post about her pet dying, and her SA disappearing. I had a similar experience. I think, when something distracts your mind from being anxious, you're not anxious. You have a 'who cares' attitude.

It's a shame that we can't distract our mind on a daily basis.
 

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I agree with distraction helping, alot of times if I am able to get in a conversation or activity beyond small talk I notice I am so focused on it that nothing about my surroundings bothers me at all, though those things happen rarely, when I am quiet and just standing there, I am much more "afraid" I guess.
 

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Fitting In Here & There
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I agree. There is something about "emergencies" or a crisis, or other unusual events that temporarily put SA on the back burner, at least for a while.

Death of someone definitely is one, although then you have the grief reaction to deal with.

Last year my boyfriend was in a coma for few days from a drug overdose and my SA was practically gone during that time. I had to talk to his family and doctors etc. It was like I "snapped" out of it for a whole week. Then when he came home (fine), everything went back to "normal"--including my SA coming back just as strong as it ever was!

I don't know...it seems like there are are more important things than SA, and once in a while that reality hits us. Then after a time, we go back to being in a position where the SA is the biggest problem we have. Although rationally we still know there are worse things going on in the world, the strong feelings come back anyway.

Sometimes I actually wonder if I could just snap out of it one day. If I can during a crisis, then why not permanently?

One positive thing I believe is: The fact that we can temporarily snap out of it is proof of our potential to live without the SA. It's like we get a little taste of where we are headed (when we are cured). So I see this as a positive thing.
 

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crazy
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Yeah it's nice to know what it's like without SA, to know what you're aiming for.

Being really close to suicide tended to do it for me - I got to the point where I just didn't give a **** what people thought of me, and ironically, everyone responded to me really positively - it was like real, actual interaction with people, even though I felt and probably looked like ****, which gave me all this hope. Of course, then the SA kicked right back in again. Grr...

Also walking around campus with a huge cold can turn the SA off - you get distracted by all the aches and pains you're feeling, and is pretty nice.
 

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crazy
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Oh, you know what this reminds me of? "The fear of God is the beginning of wisdom." The bible is always talking about not fearing other people, but fearing God. It's like you replace one fear with another one, which is sort of more controllable. It's certainly one way to sort of solve SA, but it requires the ability to believe in God.

And then when something bad happens to you randomly, you wonder what you did to displease God.

But then there's the book of Job. And Jonah and the whale.

I don't take the Bible literally, but I think it has a lot of psychological truth in it.
 

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Past experience tells me "massive events" only serve as a temporary distraction and not a longterm solution. I wish it was the case, but it's not (for me, anyway).
 

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Fitting In Here & There
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Yeah it's nice to know what it's like without SA, to know what you're aiming for.

Being really close to suicide tended to do it for me - I got to the point where I just didn't give a **** what people thought of me, and ironically, everyone responded to me really positively - it was like real, actual interaction with people, even though I felt and probably looked like ****, which gave me all this hope. Of course, then the SA kicked right back in again. Grr...

Also walking around campus with a huge cold can turn the SA off - you get distracted by all the aches and pains you're feeling, and is pretty nice.
I'm glad people were there for you when you felt suicidal. I have felt that way a lot in the past, but usually I somehow ended up in arguments with people instead of being supported. Well, even tho it was negative interaction, it worked by distracting me--I'm still here too.

It really sucks when that anxiety comes back. It feels like finally being able to feel normal slips right thru your hands!

On the lighter side, when you were sick...one time when I was in college (10 yrs ago) I was sick and talked to people fine that day. I later realized it was because I drank some medicine with alcohol in it which loosened me up... :D
 

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I was thinking about posting about something similar recently.

I've experienced this with breakups. It always gives me a push to change some things. Also when my cat was extremely sick, I called around about him... something I'd never do otherwise. I even talked to the poeple on the phone in front of my mom and anyone else who was in the room/house.
 

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I've had this before too and thought about it. I think it has to do with the appropriate reaction to things. I really suck at parties and social events because we're expected to act friendly and socialize. Whereas a natural disaster (for example) would evoke feelings of fear and anxiousness, which I happen to be an expert at, I'd fit right in.
 

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I've had this before too and thought about it. I think it has to do with the appropriate reaction to things. I really suck at parties and social events because we're expected to act friendly and socialize. Whereas a natural disaster (for example) would evoke feelings of fear and anxiousness, which I happen to be an expert at, I'd fit right in.
Lmao..... true.
 

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I guess it's because we aren't thinking about "Does this person like me?". We're thinking about surviving and possibly helping people, which isn't really the social gathering party mentality.
 

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crazy
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I'm glad people were there for you when you felt suicidal. I have felt that way a lot in the past, but usually I somehow ended up in arguments with people instead of being supported. Well, even tho it was negative interaction, it worked by distracting me--I'm still here too.

It really sucks when that anxiety comes back. It feels like finally being able to feel normal slips right thru your hands!

On the lighter side, when you were sick...one time when I was in college (10 yrs ago) I was sick and talked to people fine that day. I later realized it was because I drank some medicine with alcohol in it which loosened me up... :D
I had made up my mind to die, and I was getting my affairs in order, selling stuff so no one else would have to deal with it. It was just random strangers I was interacting with, but I guess all of my defenses were gone, and I was too preoccupied to even care if they liked me. There was no anxiety dealing with them, and I was getting all these positive vibes from them. It was really nice, and made me think there was hope after all, if I could get rid of all these defenses. But, it's not easy!

Heh, did that inspire you to try and drink alcohol before school? I'd try it but I'd be afraid of getting addicted.

But then again, alcohol and other drugs never really make me lose my self-consciousness, it's just too strong I guess!
 

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Born Of Blotmonað
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I think what plays a large role here is the focus, particularly in times of crisis. In that situation it's not being social for the sake of being social it's about addressing a something that is deeply effecting everyone around. The topic in a crisis is the same for everyone, every is follow the same script if you will. In everyday life that is not necessarily so & that's where things like not knowing how to maintain small talk/general conversation can greatly influence symptoms of SA
 

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this is true when my father died a few years back my social anxiety was great reduced...i was thinking to myself i could chasnge my life now if i stay like this but sad to say, it came back...also, when i was using heroin, when i was high or dopesick i was free of social anxiety for the most part..strange ehh?/
 

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Confused
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Your solution to SA is totally realistic.
Not sure if you're being sarcastic here, given that my initial post was about completely fictitious events. I don't think replacing one anxiety with another is really a solution, but merely a sign that SA can 'disappear' in the right circumstances. I think this shows that we do in fact have the ability to recover - the potential is most definitely there.
 
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