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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you stay at your jobs for as long as you can? Say...a year or more, especially for retail.

Quitting here and there is already harming my resume and luckily, I can leave them out and not look like i'm messing with my job history, because I use to hold two jobs at once. So they sort of overlap and also pretty much cover the gaps up.

Now, i'm only holding down one job and the work requires me to multi-task alot and sometimes requesting for shorter time can be pretty difficult as they are short of manpower and are forever hiring people. :roll

Thing is, I wonder how do people get jobs (especially office) when they have like 15 years of work experience and the longest is like 3 years and the rest is just quit and go.

I mean, how do you explain to your prosepective employer if your resume has so much job changes?
 

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I would just say you have a spectrum of skills. They don't really look into it all that much although there might be the fear factor of them thinking you won't stay.
 

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I haven't had many jobs, but I feel like I'm the opposite of that. Once I get a job that feels right to me, I have the mindset that I'm in it for the long run because I fear the unknown that a new job could bring. I don't like the idea of having to start over being the "new guy" and you have to get acquainted with new people, new corporate culture, etc. I'd rather just stay put where things are comfortable.
 

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Hi there;

I'm new here, and since my agency helpspeople find jobs, I thought I would start here. I personally usually last in jobs for 7 years. At that point I feel like I have maxed out and there is nothing new to do to impress the boss, and I am afraid I am no longer valued. My current job has been 8 years, during which time I got serious about my GAD/SAD and got on meds. I use Lexapro, Pamelor, and Xanax when things get really rough.

I am wondering if anyone has a job like I do, where I have to interact all day long, but freak out if I have to go to lunch or interact socially with anyone.

Also, if anyone wants advice about jobs, that's my specialty and I would be happy to help.:um
 

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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's not that I do not want to stay put. I mean, I want to leave because i'm uncomfortable and *hopefully* find an environment which I would be much comfortable and thrive in.

Hi there;

I'm new here, and since my agency helpspeople find jobs, I thought I would start here. I personally usually last in jobs for 7 years. At that point I feel like I have maxed out and there is nothing new to do to impress the boss, and I am afraid I am no longer valued. My current job has been 8 years, during which time I got serious about my GAD/SAD and got on meds. I use Lexapro, Pamelor, and Xanax when things get really rough.

I am wondering if anyone has a job like I do, where I have to interact all day long, but freak out if I have to go to lunch or interact socially with anyone.

Also, if anyone wants advice about jobs, that's my specialty and I would be happy to help.:um
Yep, i'm facing customers too and I absolutely hate it...but couldn't bear to leave because I can't afford to job-hop like a kangaroo too often.
 

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My first job I lasted a year and a couple months. My second major job I lasted over a year and 8 months. My most recent job I've been at for nearly four years.

Its not that hard, really, if you semi-enjoy it, or at least don't absolutely dread going in each day.

My job is very boring, but the busier jobs I've had suck and pay less. I am still waiting for a "career", but given my age, I think I'm in good shape compared to most people who seem to have jobs more out of needing spending money than necessity. I have no clue how people have cars and apartments/houses, kids, etc. on their own, unless they're all being supported by tax dollars or parents. And I'm sure many of them are.

Also, job history isn't everything. A lot of it is not how good a worker you are, or what you know, its who you know. I see people in high places that are dumber than a box of rocks.
 

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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
But the who you know aspect doesn't apply to me because well...you should have known the obvious :).

So I only can depend on my job history and education to get a job, and I've had nasty interviews in the past demanding for any work experience and some even started boasting about how long they have stayed in their jobs.
 

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When applying for a job, only record the specific instances of work history that's relevant to the job you are applying for. I worked in HR in the past and the way recruiters looks at resumes, they generally want a resume to concise and straight to the point where they describe their experience in a condensed, clear fashion and list clear definable skills, degrees certificates and the majority of resumes generally only had work history that was relevant to their position. There are plenty of people that job hop and they are hired all the time. It's all about presentation and showing the best side of yourself.
 

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Losing Ground
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How do you stay at your jobs for as long as you can? Say...a year or more, especially for retail.

Quitting here and there is already harming my resume and luckily, I can leave them out and not look like i'm messing with my job history, because I use to hold two jobs at once. So they sort of overlap and also pretty much cover the gaps up.

Now, i'm only holding down one job and the work requires me to multi-task alot and sometimes requesting for shorter time can be pretty difficult as they are short of manpower and are forever hiring people. :roll

Thing is, I wonder how do people get jobs (especially office) when they have like 15 years of work experience and the longest is like 3 years and the rest is just quit and go.

I mean, how do you explain to your prosepective employer if your resume has so much job changes?
I don't really worry about it because I only put my job highlights on my resume. There isn't enough room on a one page resume for your entire job history. There isn't even enough time in a job interview to mention your whole job history. You just want to put what is the most relevant job history or the job history you most want to employer to see. You don't necessarily have to put the most recent.
 

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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I wouldn't worry about a ton of jobs clustered in one resume because I only had like 3 atm. Only two of them is worth mentioning about, like a year on my previous office job and my current cashiering job.
 

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There are different types of resumes. If you job hop alot use a functional resume. It focuses more on skills.
 

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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks! I need a change in my resume too. It's always the same old boring format. You actually gave me some idea :)
 

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It has been said that nowadays people change jobs a lot. No more do people stay with companies for 20+ years. Job hopping probably isn't as big of a deal now as we have had ingrained in our heads. I'd imagine more function or skill based resumes will be the standard very soon.
 

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Spread Your Wings
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
^But few months would be a disaster compared to like years.
 

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Thing is, I wonder how do people get jobs (especially office) when they have like 15 years of work experience and the longest is like 3 years and the rest is just quit and go.
Easy. You just make it sound like you are on a journey of lifelong learning (which is highly supported in Singapore!).

Eg. I went from military to restaurant management to security then back to restaurant management whist studying part time, followed by "freelance projects for family" and then a term of legal studies and finally the legal industry.

I have never left a job without causing extreme mayhem (I can't ever tolerate mismanagement and leaders who care only to line their own pockets) and it's a wonder how I could find a place in the legal firm.

But if you hold your ground and make it sound like you have a plan of your own and you are, by necessity, switching career paths to best suit your learning needs and future market value, and that you are "still a student and thus ask many questions but not all employers seem to like that"... then the picture changes in your favour because you are no longer some random, naive individual off the street that employers seek to work, overwork, and dispose of before they get paid too much.

You can cover multiple job changes in a short time by stating "freelancing" and if they ask you what you did, you just say that your family requires that you cease employment in order to support the home front - which is very logical especially if you have been working full time for little benefit over a period of years.

Most importantly, you must put up a front saying you don't have experience but are willing to learn - that willingness is what separates a disposable trooper who will never know anything beyond gossip in the office, from a valued management trainee who ends up having much of the organisation's resources at her disposal.

You asked how you can join an organisation who employs good people with decades of experience - the answer is simple. You meet them in the field as clients and prove that you are unique and shine brighter than the rest.

Be proactive and don't wait for people to make suggestions - make said innovations before anyone gets to them, and opportunities arise automatically.

Of course, don't let anyone know how your mind works. Subterfuge is the key to protecting yourself from exploitation (no one can predict you), and keeping doors open to new possibilities.
 

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If they ask you why you've had a lot of jobs you could just say that you still haven't found the right role or that you like moving around to get experience??

Not sure, I kind of have the same problem, I seem to have changed jobs every 9 months to a year. Most of the time it's because it's for more $ which I guess is legitimate..
 

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If they ask you why you've had a lot of jobs you could just say that you still haven't found the right role or that you like moving around to get experience??

Not sure, I kind of have the same problem, I seem to have changed jobs every 9 months to a year. Most of the time it's because it's for more $ which I guess is legitimate..
 

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My job track record is really crappy and always has been. Too many jobs like in an office with a lot of boring extroverts, and after awhile I am so miserable because of the people that I have to get out, like I am being smothered.
Its a waste of time to be put in another setting like that. I want something in a small group or independent situation.
Everyday, I job search but its either positions with too many people, and jobs like IT, where it seems like you have to have a load of degrees. I have 3 college degrees. Then there are jobs on the other end of the spectrum, like cleaning toilets. Now, I am not saying that I am too good for that. I did a bunch of grunt jobs growing up. I am almost 50 and don't want to do that kind of work anymore.
God, I hate Mondays!
 
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