Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Of course I know that sa is not contagious, that it can be passed on through genes and it is also affected by environmental factors.

However, I have to believe that my sa is contagious :?

When I first moved to the city I moved in with a friend I went to school with. During the first 6 months she was extremely outgoing and social, she talked to me all the time (though getting little response) and would invite me out places etc etc. She seemed confident, self assured and HAPPY! Myself, on the otherhand, I didnt adjust well to suddenly living in another environment with someone I didnt really feel comfortable with. I became extremely reclusive, rarely coming out of my room.

Anyways, later that year, my friend changed. She seemed to copy my depression patterns. She stopped talking to me and moved her television from the lounge into her bedroom. She rarely came out of bedroom and when she did we only ever managed small talk, where as before we had long conversations.

Of course i realise other stuff in her life may have caused the change not me, but still i cant help feeling somewhat responsible.

Then i often notice that people i am around often become quieter, more reserved and often uncomfortable in their interactions (not just with me but with others too).

But the final conclusion to my large assumption in my pyschriatrist, I swear i have given him social anxiety. the more time i spend with him the more i notice how awkward he has become, how he now stutters and has to clear his throat, how he avoids eye contact and how he does nervous twitches with his hands.

is it possible my sa is contagious, im not sure, but many things are pointing to YES. maybe im just :par
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
im surprised at the psychiatrist part tho lol maybe my assumption of them being bastions of emotional stablitity is wrong
Many people choose a career or profession because of a past experience and/or passion for the area. Often, this "passion" is personal.

I know a child psychiatrist who is very socially introverted (if I may use that phrase). She knows what sa is because she lived it. Today, she is an expert in her field and a renowned author. So, yes, it is very possible that our medical health experts not only have the "book learning" but also the "personal learning".

One more comment - "birds of a feather flock together". It appears the original poster is very observant and intuitive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,162 Posts
I wouldn't say I have the capability to give someone else SAD, but I see what you mean. People become uncomfortable around you because they know you become uncomfortable around others. I think people don't know how to respond to it. To me, there are two kinds of responses. Some people try to battle it. When you are silent, they try to grab your attention. They recognize you and want to make you recognized. Not to humilate you (although you may feel humilated), but to make you not forgotten, to show that they care... or, they feel threatened or offended by your lack of sociability, and they interpret it as a form of elitism or discontent, ie they take it personally, so they will give you a disheartened look, or say something behind your back. Others will withdraw in an almost similar manner around you. I've noticed that while I'm trying to make eye contact with a certain friend, he will make less than me. I don't think the condition is contagious in general, but you can definately provoke anxiety in others, yes.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top