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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I were to major in Psychology, what job opportunities are there for a psychology degree?

I've heard that this is an over-crowded major with very few job opportunities.

Is this true?
 

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If you were to get a PhD in Psychology, there will be plenty of job opportunities.

My sister-in-law only got a BA in Psychology. Four months after she graduated, she landed a job with Eli Lilly and Company and is a pharmacutical sales rep. She works only four days a week and she chooses the time of day of when she wants to work. She drives around and goes to meetings with doctors and try's to sell them her company's drugs. After 2 years on the job, she was making 6 figures.

So a pharmacutical sales rep is one job oppurtunity that comes to mind.
 

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It's not as useless as Women's Studies but unless you get PhD you won't be able to do much with any lesser degree in this field.
 

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I don't think there are too many useless majors but rather there are a lot of people who pick the wrong major for them. Psychology can be very useful depending on what your goals and interests are. But for some people it's totally wrong. Nobody can really tell you if it's the right major for you except yourself.

I know that's vague and not very helpful. But generally, if you aren't sure about your career path right now, pick a field that really interests you. One rarely goes wrong when following their interests (the exception being when it conflicts with another life goal). Don't worry about whether your field is over crowded because many degrees, like psychology, are useful in different fields.

A bachelors degree is about getting a broad education and learning useful life skills. Your choice of degree is not really as important as many people at that age think. For example, even if you end up wanting to go to med school, most medical admissions committees would take more interest in a history major (who fulfilled med school requirements) over someone who majored in biology and minored in chem (all other things being equal). I'm not making this up and you should speak to a career counselor at your school to verify this. Remember this is assuming you've fulfilled the requirements to get into med school like math.

But you can do pretty much anything with most degrees. The world is not as rigid as you may think. Many computer programmers did not major in computer programming. Many financial planners did not major in finance. The CEO at one place I worked at (with over 7,000 employees) did not have a business degree... And so on. A lot of schools will also discourage things like getting a pre-med degree and there is no such thing as an undergrad pre-law major (at most reputable schools).

Why is this? Because over-specialization at a young age tends to lead to a narrow perspective. Most higher paid jobs need people who have a broad set of skills and experience. When I went to grad school, there was clearly an interest in cross disciplinary studies. Most grad departments loved getting students who had undergrad degrees from a different major.

So if you're uncertain right now, don't worry so much about it. The world is a very uncertain place. It's more important to learn to deal with uncertainty as it happens rather than feel your life should have a set path ahead of you, fwiw.
 

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A Ph.D. in Psych is pretty useless as well. There is no reason to go that far in that field if you can't prescribe medication to patients and won't have the job security or financial stability of an M.D. Other than being a psychologist your options become limited financially of what you can do with that degree. Sure you can become a professor or something along those lines, but those jobs are hard to find and don't pay very well.
 

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I don't think there are too many useless majors but rather there are a lot of people who pick the wrong major for them. Psychology can be very useful depending on what your goals and interests are. But for some people it's totally wrong. Nobody can really tell you if it's the right major for you except yourself.

I know that's vague and not very helpful. But generally, if you aren't sure about your career path right now, pick a field that really interests you. One rarely goes wrong when following their interests (the exception being when it conflicts with another life goal). Don't worry about whether your field is over crowded because many degrees, like psychology, are useful in different fields.

A bachelors degree is about getting a broad education and learning useful life skills. Your choice of degree is not really as important as many people at that age think. For example, even if you end up wanting to go to med school, most medical admissions committees would take more interest in a history major (who fulfilled med school requirements) over someone who majored in biology and minored in chem (all other things being equal). I'm not making this up and you should speak to a career counselor at your school to verify this. Remember this is assuming you've fulfilled the requirements to get into med school like math.

But you can do pretty much anything with most degrees. The world is not as rigid as you may think. Many computer programmers did not major in computer programming. Many financial planners did not major in finance. The CEO at one place I worked at (with over 7,000 employees) did not have a business degree... And so on. A lot of schools will also discourage things like getting a pre-med degree and there is no such thing as an undergrad pre-law major (at most reputable schools).

Why is this? Because over-specialization at a young age tends to lead to a narrow perspective. Most higher paid jobs need people who have a broad set of skills and experience. When I went to grad school, there was clearly an interest in cross disciplinary studies. Most grad departments loved getting students who had undergrad degrees from a different major.

So if you're uncertain right now, don't worry so much about it. The world is a very uncertain place. It's more important to learn to deal with uncertainty as it happens rather than feel your life should have a set path ahead of you, fwiw.
:agree

Well said
 

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I have a BS in psych. To do anything, really, you'll need at least master's. It also depends on if you want to do clinical psych or not. For clinical, your master's will be sufficient - at least in Ohio.

Psych is also the most popular major in the college of arts and sciences at my university, so there are a lot of people majoring in it. (I got my psych degree at a different school though.)

Have a nice day,
Kelly :)
 

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It defenitely not useless. You could try a double major if you're interested in a subject that could add to it (that's why I'm going for a double degree in biological anthropology and criminal justice).

Anthropology is my main interest, but I enjoy criminal justice as well and its more secure as a career.

Are you planning to attend grad school?
 

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If you aren't going to go past a bachelors it is useless unless you have a lot of social connections or know someone which is exactly the reason I transferred out of psychology when I found out. You will have to do lots of clinical hours (free work) and years of study plus sucking up to professors on top of all the serious debt you will accumulate. In the end I wasn't willing to do all that even if I did something that didn't involve patients you still need to be social to get jobs so as someone with SA it didn't seem so feasible. .
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't think there are too many useless majors but rather there are a lot of people who pick the wrong major for them. Psychology can be very useful depending on what your goals and interests are. But for some people it's totally wrong. Nobody can really tell you if it's the right major for you except yourself.

I know that's vague and not very helpful. But generally, if you aren't sure about your career path right now, pick a field that really interests you. One rarely goes wrong when following their interests (the exception being when it conflicts with another life goal). Don't worry about whether your field is over crowded because many degrees, like psychology, are useful in different fields.

A bachelors degree is about getting a broad education and learning useful life skills. Your choice of degree is not really as important as many people at that age think. For example, even if you end up wanting to go to med school, most medical admissions committees would take more interest in a history major (who fulfilled med school requirements) over someone who majored in biology and minored in chem (all other things being equal). I'm not making this up and you should speak to a career counselor at your school to verify this. Remember this is assuming you've fulfilled the requirements to get into med school like math.

But you can do pretty much anything with most degrees. The world is not as rigid as you may think. Many computer programmers did not major in computer programming. Many financial planners did not major in finance. The CEO at one place I worked at (with over 7,000 employees) did not have a business degree... And so on. A lot of schools will also discourage things like getting a pre-med degree and there is no such thing as an undergrad pre-law major (at most reputable schools).

Why is this? Because over-specialization at a young age tends to lead to a narrow perspective. Most higher paid jobs need people who have a broad set of skills and experience. When I went to grad school, there was clearly an interest in cross disciplinary studies. Most grad departments loved getting students who had undergrad degrees from a different major.

So if you're uncertain right now, don't worry so much about it. The world is a very uncertain place. It's more important to learn to deal with uncertainty as it happens rather than feel your life should have a set path ahead of you, fwiw.
Thank you. This helped me a lot.
 

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I was a psych major but changed because I was struggling a lot with the mathematics requirements at the university I was going to. Now I have three different majors all in one. As for employment, you may find jobs in sales, health related services, administrative positions, education/ teaching, and public relations.
 

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It's not useless if you get and advanced degree in it. I've heard you at least need a masters minimum and to practice you really need a Phd.
 

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if you're going to major in psych, major in something else as well. if you have sa it is really hard to get a job thats beyond something you could get with just a high school diploma with just a bachelors in psych.
 

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I was going to major in Psych as well, but decided that considering the amount of work & money needed to get a job that would stablize me, it's not really worth it. I guess what it really comes down to is how much you love it and are willing to work to get a degree like that because unless you get your master's, there are few good, financially securing jobs. I mean, I really LOVE psychology. It's what i really want to do, but at the same time, I'm a magazine journalism major right now and feel that I can write/research things to tell people about topics that will affect their lives, especially psychological subjects.
 

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Well the bottom line is that if you want to make decent money you are going to have to work your *** off in any field. Some fields just offer more realistic opportunities than others to reach the goal of making decent money. There's one thing to love something dearly and another thing to be realistic and work in a field that can actually give you a stable financial life.
 

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I have a psych degree and stable, well-paying job, but it took me a while to find one. There for a while I quit the field and went into graphic design, which paid reeeeeaaaally badly lol. Basically, you need a higher degree than a bachelor's if you want to do anything in psych that involves therapy...which I have no desire to pursue. I'm pretty happy working in the ER and only seeing each patient once.
 

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pick a field that really interests you.
I know a few guys with bachelor's in History and Political science. They picked something that really interested them, but considering that half of them works in Burger King, and the other half in Pizza Hut something tells me they didn't make the right decision. I still think that you should consider what your degree is really worth in the real world.

Many computer programmers did not major in computer programming.
That was the case about 10 years ago. After the dot-com bubble burst IT companies had gotten more picky.
 

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I know a few guys with bachelor's in History and Political science. They picked something that really interested them, but considering that half of them works in Burger King, and the other half in Pizza Hut something tells me they didn't make the right decision. I still think that you should consider what your degree is really worth in the real world.
That's a correlation and does not show cause and effect. Have you ever thought maybe those guys would be working at Burger King regardless of their major?

There are lots of people who will say that... I majored in 'x' and now I work at mcd so major 'x' sucks. What about all the people who majored in x and became very successful? They need to take responsibility for where they ended up. It's not your major or your school or etc... it's you. I don't mean that in a derogatory way... obviously one can have other issues that keep them from being successful. By the way, that CEO I mentioned before only had a ba in geography.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I appreciate everyone's responses. :)

Also, I'd like to make it clear that if i did decide to go into this field, I would probably not just settle for a BA.

What different types of careers in psychology are available for someone with a masters?

Btw, I'm not interested in becoming a psychiatrist or attending 4 years of med school.
 
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