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Post-human
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Discussion Starter #1
I've noticed that if I go a few hours without talking, when I finallly do talk, my voice is all hoarse and shaky as if I had a cold. My throat is itchy and I always feel the need to cough afterwards.

I have good vocabulary, writting has never been an issue for me but when I speak out loud, anything I say doesn't seem to come out right. Like if I want to tell a story to someone, I'll always have to repeat myself multiple times because all they heard was mumbling. Sometimes I'll even forget some words and use a bunch of neologisms. It's as if I don't know how to speak anymore.

Do you think it is possible to become mute if you don't talk enough ? or am I just freaking out ?
 

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SAS Member
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It would help to practice talking out loud by yourself, whether you're reading from something or coming up with an imaginary conversation.
 

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I'm pretty sure there's nothing physiological that will prevent you from speaking just because you haven't said anything in a long while. It could build up an anxiety towards talking if you don't do it enough though, which could result in selective muteness. But I reckon that wasn't what you had in mind.
 

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Post-human
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Discussion Starter #6
I'm pretty sure there's nothing physiological that will prevent you from speaking just because you haven't said anything in a long while. It could build up an anxiety towards talking if you don't do it enough though, which could result in selective muteness. But I reckon that wasn't what you had in mind.
yeah I as thinking about being physically mute. But yeah I guess I'm just freaking out
 

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Goofy Goober
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Considering I was pretty much mute for most of my life (like until like age 14 I would say but even now I don't say much) and I can still talk, I think your muteness won't affect your ability to talk much. Sure, you may not know how to control your voice sometimes because you are not used to talking, but I definitely don't think you will become completely mute.
 

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You won't become mute. The worst that can happen is you won't be very articulate(mumbling, low voice) when you do talk and people will often ask you to repeat yourself like you mentioned in your post.
 

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Don't Worry

Mainly its a confidence thing if your voice is poor when you have actually been speaking a number of times during that day. It is not uncommon when stressing the voice in a rarely used manner or even for your age normal speach to have distortions in sound either through coughing, cracking, or hoarseness. Sorry but puberty sucks, your voice will probably not be smooth for a few years yet (assuming you didn't hit puberty a long while ago... I am a guy a bit different time scale) When your super nervous, your voice will either be irregular or monotone.

You probably have too much experience with reading versus talking. I had the bad habit of mumbling on top of using higher end vocabulary. People thought I was insulting their intellegience or a show off in that regard. Actually once I began talking more I believe I have better enunciation then a lot of people probably from reading so extensively and from having debate in high school.

The vocabulary thing is just something that you will have to bear with for awhile. Its how you think, you have to get used to mirroring your words to the level/ manner of speaking of the person you are talking to. That takes a lot of time to master if you ever truly do.

So all in all you should practice talking more and not worry about your voice cracking or being rough (lack of sleep can affect it too). Reading is a good start. Talking with your parents and/or siblings more would be a better start or next step, then talking to classmates, and then friends (assuming you have little to no friends). Finally don't get irritated when you have to repeat something. Sometimes it doesn't have to do with how you sound but they aren't paying attention, are to tired to understand, or are so astounded that you actually said something that they missed what you said.
 

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Read Dr. Seuss or poetry out loud it seems more natural then a novel or if you really brave a play with different voices by stressing your voice more you will have more control over it. Speak slower and louder then you want in social situations. Mumbling is partly due to a lack of breath and partly due to a lack of drive to be heard.
 

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I've been wondering this. The past few years I have hardly been talking to anyone unless I'm at work. My speech has suffered as a result. I'm not sure if it's due to not talking enough or if it's a mental thing. Like you I can organize my thoughts well when I write, but speaking them is incredibly difficult. I've been reading out loud to myself and occasionally trying tongue twisters in hopes that it will help. Sometimes I even talk to myself when I'm alone, almost practicing conversation with myself. Not sure if it is really helping at all, but it could be something to try.
 

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Sometimes I wish I were mute. Then no one could blame me for not talking and I would no longer hate my voice (since I have none).
 
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