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I'm thinking about going on disability...is anyone on here haveing it? I feel like a loser getting it but at the same time it would really help. I just don't know what my chances are of getting it. I mean I think that I come off as not being all that anxious but I really am inside. PLEASE HELP!!!
 

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Daydreaming
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I've had it for a year now. I don't think it's that weird. It's hard to get though, especially probably just for anxiety. If you are willing to wait, and fill out tons of paperwork and get a "no" from them on your first try (almost everyone gets a no on the first time) after that you have to apply again and see what happens. 2nd time I was accepted.
 

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I'm in the process now. I've been turned down twice despite having SA, depression, agorophobia, and bipolar. I have a lawyer so I'm just praying he can help me. My depression/anxiety is so bad I can't even leave the house most of the time.

And don't feel like a loser. I did at first but when I realized how much I had worked previously and contributed to social security I was fine with it.
 

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I'm on SSI and I feel like a total loser... I think if I ever tell someone in real life, someone my age, about me living on government handouts, he/she won't even talk to me, ever...

When I turned 18, my mother, with the help of my therapist, did all the papers, without me knowing... and I didn't compain than...
But now I am used to this free cheese, and I feel that this free money stripped me out of motivation to work altogether...

I am a leech of society, and I am ashamed beyond words.
 

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I've thought about it. I also have epilepsy but it's quite mild so that might not be as helpful as you might think.

I also hear disability is very hard to get and I don't imagine it's any easier with the economy being what it is now. Plus, I think you usually have to show that you've tried treatments for whatever ails you extensively with no success.

Anyway, it would be great because I just can't cope with life. Ironically, I wouldn't feel like such a loser if I could get disability. I feel like a loser living off my parents. Society generally takes a much dimmer view of an adult asking their parents for money than it does of someone who's proved they have a legitimate disability getting money from the government. Every time I meet someone who starts a conversation, I dread them asking me what I do or something. I'd feel more comfortable trying to date someone if I had my own income. Even if it was disability. I think women especially look down on men who live with their parents.
 

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I'm on SSI and I feel like a total loser... I think if I ever tell someone in real life, someone my age, about me living on government handouts, he/she won't even talk to me, ever...

When I turned 18, my mother, with the help of my therapist, did all the papers, without me knowing... and I didn't compain than...
But now I am used to this free cheese, and I feel that this free money stripped me out of motivation to work altogether...

I am a leech of society, and I am ashamed beyond words.
Me too man. It allows me to live where I want to live and pay rent and buy my own food and pay my own bills, but I feel so guilty. It's a big reason I avoid meeting new people or talking to anyone, because one of the questions is always "So what do you do?"

How easy it is to get on depends where you live. I am in Ontario, Canada and I got on it quite easily. I had my psychiatrist at the time fill out the thing and I mailed it. I get $1020/month and I get a 2% "raise" every November. Been on it 3 years now.
 

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Space Cadet
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I am in Ontario, Canada and I got on it quite easily. I had my psychiatrist at the time fill out the thing and I mailed it. I get $1020/month and I get a 2% "raise" every November. Been on it 3 years now.
Wow. That sounds like a deal. Here in the US my insurance company won't even cover mental health stuff (as I found out rather abruptly just yesterday), to say nothing of getting disability for it.

Not that I need it. I think I keep my anxiety in check well enough.
 

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Me too man. It allows me to live where I want to live and pay rent and buy my own food and pay my own bills, but I feel so guilty. It's a big reason I avoid meeting new people or talking to anyone, because one of the questions is always "So what do you do?"

How easy it is to get on depends where you live. I am in Ontario, Canada and I got on it quite easily. I had my psychiatrist at the time fill out the thing and I mailed it. I get $1020/month and I get a 2% "raise" every November. Been on it 3 years now.
In Australia it's pretty good as well. I think it's about 600 a fortnight.

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I've been out of work for about 2.5 yrs and have just relied on my own savings and my parents (how fkn lame) in that time. I spoke to a GP about it last month and he said once you get it, there could be a problem finding work again as it wouldn't be looked upon favourably. He made it seem like it was the be all and end all.

I told him I felt ashamed @ getting it because I didn't see Major Depression, SA, and generalized anxiety as a disability and he gave the analogy of a diabetic with 1 leg which made me think different. I wish I could have had that 300 a week for the last 2.5 years because I've worked since 17 and if not for my family I'd be totally fkd. The income stream would've got me a bit more confident and ready to go find work again.

I think he kind of talked me out of it by saying "what's the worst that could happen" with regards to finding work. I guess it's up to me to just do it but in the meantime I'm losing a **** load of savings and probably could've saved about 30K and used it to go back to uni or to fund therapy or something.

argghh

I would find it the end of the road though because when people ask "what do you do" I'd be so ashamed. Right now I just say I'm on a career break but that's wearing thin to be honest. I wish I could just get the motivation to get up every morning and just go for it. Stupid depression and anxiety is killing my life. Alot of it is perceived anxiety it's nuts. My thought patterns are what is fkn me up.

I think you could use it as a short term stop gap and try and get things to go better, and if you get in a rut again then you have it as a fall back
 

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I think if you're genuinely incapable of work. I think with SA it is a grey area and it's not like a broken leg where it gets better whatever you think, your unhealthy thoughts can sabotage treatment. It's also reinforcing in that if you are not working you can become more miserable and lose contact with people and become less employable and feel like it is more impossible. You can have good or bad days, I think it is easier to say where your limits are if it is physical.

I'm seeing a disability adviser at the jobcentre next week.

I'm living off my partner which doesn't feel great as I don't want to ask for anything that isn't essential or he doesn't offer. I feel I should have an independent income and it bothers me as we're not married. The state expects him to support me though and I can only get benefits based on my previous earnings which is awkward as I was a PhD student then only worked for 1 of the years they count. I'm not on any benefits yet, I'll see after I've been to the jobcentre, maybe jobseekers allowance if they give me support.

I think you are right that claiming disability will look bad to an employer. With disability legislation it shouldn't but not sure I'd risk it. My partner just says to blame my lack of work on the economy and that it won't stand out at the moment.
 

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I've never bothered to try since I figured it'd be too much of a hassle convincing those guys. Couldn't even convince my family. Plus I'd feel guilty since I can work, but I'm restricted to such a limited number of unskilled, low-pay jobs. Haven't worked in almost two years because of my suicide-bomber demeanor during job interviews, lack of references, etc.

I always wondered what would count as disability fraud in these cases. Like on those caught-on-camera reality programs where they tape people who allegedly can't walk, but were found somewhere playing a baseball game. "Hey, that guy's talking to a member of the opposite sex without urinating himself!" Sorry, ignore me.
 

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You've certainly got nothing to lose by trying! ;-)

I'm on a government benefit called 'Employment Support Allowance' with my job centre which is more or less a type of disability allowance for those who, due to an illness or disability, can't work for a while. I was doubtful whether I'd get it when first applying, but did anyway. Mind you though, that's here in the UK. I'm not sure what country you're from so unfortunately couldn't say for sure whether it's likely you'd get the same kind of thing or not. Though I would still say give it a try anyway! Severe SA is a type of disability really, as it does very much have an impact on how people who suffer from it function on a day-to-day basis - and as well as just affecting them on a mental level it does also have physical effects too. Maybe it'd help if you prepared some notes in advance of talking to the people you need to about this, in terms of how it impacts upon you. With me, when applying for my benefit, I pointed out things such as having frequent panic attacks at work which stopped me concentrating, having low energy (because of the bouts of depression I also experience), feeling unable to communicate effectively with others and so on. It definitely helped me I think.

Good luck with everything! I hope you get somewhere.
 

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I was on sickness benefits due to social anxiety and psychosis but have since moved onto jobseekers.

Whilst things where easier on the sick benefits I feel more active on jobseekers as I have to challenge myself to go out and actively participate in things.
 

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VCL X1: but I'm restricted to such a limited number of unskilled, low-pay jobs.


This has always been my problem too. I have a 4 year degree and some graduate classes, and I'm always taking crappy jobs because I'm so anxious. I'm even too anxious to admit to people I have a degree because then they'll ask why I'm not using it. For me school is easy but working is so scary that I still don't have a job in my field, which is teaching. (well I have been an aide, which I loved, but you don't get paid much). Ha I want to be a teacher so bad but I don't want to be on display all day. I'm wasting my life thinking about it. I've done a lot of volunteer work with kids of all ages but the thought of doing it everyday for lots of kids is still overwhelming.
 

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Six days ago, I finally received word that I was approved for SSI. It was my third time trying - this decision was the result of an April 20 hearing.

It is a huge relief to finally be approved - and a bit of a pleasant surprise - because there were plenty of times when things weren't looking good, as far as my chances.

From a "day to day" standpoint - I suffer from severe social anxiety, severe depression (with psychotic features), and marked generalized anxiety. (The severe depression is in partial remission.) But the judge simply wrote in his decision that I'm disabled because of "anxiety, depression, and substance-abuse currently in remission" (my so-called "substance abuse" isn't what you would think of when you typically think of "substance abuse").

(Maybe I should wait to submit this post because technically, I won't believe that I'm on SSI until I receive the 2nd monthly payment, lol. The process was that arduous and trying....I was almost convinced that my third attempt had failed.)

A former psychiatrist started urging me to apply for SSI as early as 2002 - but it took me a while to "warm up" to the idea for reasons that many of you stated. I felt like I would be "giving up" to apply for disability, that it represented permanent failure (although that's not necessarily the case). I felt funny about being dependent on a "government handout". But after a couple of years went by without my getting any better (I seemed to get worse) - I started realizing that the chances of my being able to sustain a job were getting slimmer by the year: this is when SSI started becoming a more attractive option. Still, it took me a few more years to actually apply - because of massive motivation issues (I didn't have the motivation to deal with real-life, practical matters. I just wanted to "escape" into a fantasy world of the Internet and my various "interests".).

In all, it took two years and three months (27 months) from initial application to finally getting approved - a long time, but I should feel lucky because others have had it much worse as far as wait-times.

I don't worry about the stigma all that much. The way I figure, I have characteristics that stigmatize me in this society anyway - SSI or no SSI. I was already stigmatized for not living up to the "outgoing ideal" that this society holds. I was already stigmatized for being "quiet", "weird", "withdrawn", "unapproachable", "boring", "shy", "stuck-up", "standoffish", "crazy", "weak", "pathetic" - or whatever other labels that clueless, judgmental people have attached to me. The same people who are so judgmental are the same people who were fortunate enough to be spared our suffering - whose lives are much easier as a result of their relative mental-health - so why should their opinions have any credence?

For there to be such a stigma about having a serious mental disorder that prevents you from working indicates that there is a problem with society, not with the individual who is suffering.

I envy how relatively easy it is to get disability in places like the U.K. and Canada - and the relatively large amount these countries pay their disabled.
 

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VCL X1: but I'm restricted to such a limited number of unskilled, low-pay jobs.

This has always been my problem too. I have a 4 year degree and some graduate classes, and I'm always taking crappy jobs because I'm so anxious. I'm even too anxious to admit to people I have a degree because then they'll ask why I'm not using it. For me school is easy but working is so scary that I still don't have a job in my field, which is teaching. (well I have been an aide, which I loved, but you don't get paid much). Ha I want to be a teacher so bad but I don't want to be on display all day. I'm wasting my life thinking about it. I've done a lot of volunteer work with kids of all ages but the thought of doing it everyday for lots of kids is still overwhelming.
I sympathise. I finished a PhD 2 years ago but have only managed to get a job as a secretary or school technician which are poorly paid. I'm often too embarrassed to use the title Dr or admit to my PhD.
 

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I will have little choice but to apply for disability soon, before I run out of savings.

I am unable to access my scientific research career and struggle in jobs with far fewer qualification requirements (e.g. school lab technician).

I am diagnosed autistic, and they just assume the social anxiety is a part of that. I have also been diagnosed with generalised anxiety disorder.

I am very skilled and conscientious by nature, so the thought of never being able to properly access the workplace disturbs me more than anything else. Many thousands of people have to resort to disability simply because disability is not properly accommodated and supported in the workplace and society.
 

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For there to be such a stigma about having a serious mental disorder that prevents you from working indicates that there is a problem with society, not with the individual who is suffering.
It's amazing how many people don't realize this. They don't want to, in my opinion. It's easy enough to have an opinion that conflicts with reality when the majority is with you.
 

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Do not feel like a loser....I have been working for the last 12 years held 10 jobs since...struggling to get through the everyday office routine....it is very tough and it has had a toll on me and my home life....If I did not live in California I would apply for SSI after all the way things are going SSI will not be around very long!
 

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Its impossible unless you lie/exaggerate about everything and wait for like 10 years. I tried, gave up. If you're older it might not be so hard but if you're in your 20s and have EVER worked a day in your life, you might as well forget it. They denied me because I've worked in the past and because I'm young. Basically I think you'd have to walk in with your brain hanging out of your skull to even be considered. And even then I'm not so sure....
 
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