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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

This summer I've been working on independent student research as part of a pre graduate school program I'm in. I chose to research SAD, and have spent the last two months analyzing a ton of literature and studies done on the disorder (cause, treament, symptoms, etiology, etc) working alongside a faculty mentor in the psychology department.
On Tuesday, July 7th, I will be presenting my research to a conference of my fellow students, faculty and whoever else drops by. A ten minute power point presentation followed by Q & A from the audience.

I'll be presenting a poster on Wed, but thats not nearly as intimidating since I'm mostly standing around by my poster and talking to people who come up.

So yeah the presentation has me pretty nervous. But I'm determined to do it. I want to tell people about this disorder. Its hugely misunderstood and needs to be advocated. Thats the reason I decided to do this in the first place.

I don't know if I can last ten minutes. I always talk fast and lose track of time (and what I'm saying). But I need to do this right. If anyone has any advice or encouragement I'd love to hear it.
 

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She-Wolf
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thats really really great to hear :) not only that you will do this having SA, which is incredibly difficult, but the fact that you are doing it to get more information and knowledge on this disorder out there.

i wish you all the best. since you know the material so well i'm sure it will go great. :) report back after you're done! i'd be interested to know what the Q & A will be like.
 

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Wow, that's such an incredible thing to do. Just think, by doing this presentation, you'll be fighting your SA, educating others about SA AND helping people with SA! I wish you lots of luck. Let us know how it goes :)
 

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Hello all,

This summer I've been working on independent student research as part of a pre graduate school program I'm in. I chose to research SAD, and have spent the last two months analyzing a ton of literature and studies done on the disorder (cause, treament, symptoms, etiology, etc) working alongside a faculty mentor in the psychology department.
On Tuesday, July 7th, I will be presenting my research to a conference of my fellow students, faculty and whoever else drops by. A ten minute power point presentation followed by Q & A from the audience.

I'll be presenting a poster on Wed, but thats not nearly as intimidating since I'm mostly standing around by my poster and talking to people who come up.

So yeah the presentation has me pretty nervous. But I'm determined to do it. I want to tell people about this disorder. Its hugely misunderstood and needs to be advocated. Thats the reason I decided to do this in the first place.

I don't know if I can last ten minutes. I always talk fast and lose track of time (and what I'm saying). But I need to do this right. If anyone has any advice or encouragement I'd love to hear it.
I'll be thinking about you on Tuesday. What you're doing is very brave and you're helping us all by informing others about SAD. Maybe they'll be able to understand us and how some of us feel when we go about our daily lives in a state of anxiety and fear. I wish I could bring myself to do something as important as you're doing. Don't start thinking negatively about yourself after you've worked so hard to put this together. You deserve to have some faith in yourself. Judging from your determination and your genuine desire to educate others about SAD, I think you're going to do great. :boogie
Thank you for what you're doing. Make sure to come back and let us know about the presentation!
 

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Right on. Good luck.

Hey can you mention my name in your presentation? You know, thank me, like they do at awards ceremonies? :b kidding

No seriously though, that's really awesome that you are doing that. Do they know that you have SA? That would be badass of you to announce it in your presentation. Crazy, but badass. :b :nw
 

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I applaud you for doing this research and having the courage to present it to others. I have had to do presentations before my staff at work, what helped is that I was presented information about children with special needs. I thought I am not doing this for myself but for them.

I think you can focus on all the people you will be helping by doing this. It's not about you but all the people who suffer from this terrible disorder. Again I applaud you for doing this. I wish you the best of luck for Tuesday. We need more people who actually have suffered from a mental health disoder in the mental health profession. You will be a great advocate.

Antonina
 

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My advice is take bet blockers.
LaRibbon, do you take beta-blockers? I have an RX, but I am hesitant to take them since what I have been told is that you have to take them constantly. One time I was taking them for a while and then stopped and had a bad reaction.

I really only want to take them as needed, like for a presentation or a date or something. Is that what you do? Which Rx do you have if you don't mind me asking?

I mean I have read here and there that people take them "as needed", like for stage fright, but I wonder if some beta-blockers are different than others.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everybody :)

was any of the information you came across particularly interesting, helpful, unknown, significant, etc?
Actually yes. Learning all there is to know on something that affects you really helps your perspective on what to do with it. My favorite book source is Social Anxiety Disorder: Advances in Psychotherapy by Martin Antony & Karen Rowa.

Right on. Good luck.

No seriously though, that's really awesome that you are doing that. Do they know that you have SA? That would be badass of you to announce it in your presentation. Crazy, but badass. :b :nw
I don't think I could manage that lol. I haven't been able to tell my faculty mentor (who's been supervising all my work) that I have SA.

My advice is take bet blockers. They work great for presentations :)

Otherwise goodluck! I'm so glad you chose SAD for your research. And sh*t your only 21? Already doing research. Well done. :clap

You'll be fine. Just concentrate on what your saying, and don't look at their faces too much!
You need a perscription for beta blockers, right? I've been wanting to try some sort of medication for a long time now.

I think I could learn from my own research - while I'll be doing an overview of SAD in general I did focus specifically on delayed tretament seeking and safety/avoidance behaviors - something I'm rather guilty of myself - dropping out of treatment a few years back.
 

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crazy
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I don't know if I can last ten minutes. I always talk fast and lose track of time (and what I'm saying). But I need to do this right. If anyone has any advice or encouragement I'd love to hear it.
The more you practice the talk, the better. I used to avoid practicing talks because it made me nervous just thinking about it, but I always regretted it, because I'd get nervous and skip over details, and spend all my energy trying to remember what to say (and how to say it) instead of focusing on the audience. (maybe that was my strategy all along, hah!)

Anyway, it sounds like a great thing to do - good luck!
 

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Hello all,

This summer I've been working on independent student research as part of a pre graduate school program I'm in. I chose to research SAD, and have spent the last two months analyzing a ton of literature and studies done on the disorder (cause, treament, symptoms, etiology, etc) working alongside a faculty mentor in the psychology department.
On Tuesday, July 7th, I will be presenting my research to a conference of my fellow students, faculty and whoever else drops by. A ten minute power point presentation followed by Q & A from the audience.

I'll be presenting a poster on Wed, but thats not nearly as intimidating since I'm mostly standing around by my poster and talking to people who come up.

So yeah the presentation has me pretty nervous. But I'm determined to do it. I want to tell people about this disorder. Its hugely misunderstood and needs to be advocated. Thats the reason I decided to do this in the first place.

I don't know if I can last ten minutes. I always talk fast and lose track of time (and what I'm saying). But I need to do this right. If anyone has any advice or encouragement I'd love to hear it.
What you are doing is very brave and those who don't have SA don't understand how difficult doing something like this can be. I wish I could do something like what you are doing. I think getting the word out on SA is very important and if this helps even one person who has SA or helps someone better understand others who have SA it is a major success. Let us know how it goes even though I am sure you will do great. Thanks for what you are doing and good luck. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Update.

That was certainly an experience. Long story short, it went pretty well.

I was actually called up to present sooner that I thought - I was chewing gum at the moment and didn't want to publicly throw it away.

It went all right, I actually had to speed up because I was close to going over ten minutes. Then three or four people has questions and I actually answered them pretty well.

I was sure that my voice had been shaking during the presentation - I actually don't remember much of the actual presentation (its blurry). But people said it wasn't.

But after the presentation a lot of people came up to me and told me I had done really well - but what stuck out to me most was the program director coming up to me as we left for the lunch break and telling me I had "the voice of a professor." I always thought I had a funny voice, but he said I had a very "crisp" tone.

Either I'm better than I think at speaking or I always need to talk while trying to conceal the fact that I have gum in my mouth.

He and another faculty member told me my presentation had been among the best ones.

I thought for a while the other students in my program might be giving me complients out of pity, but I actually think I may have actually done a good job.

Now just some poster presentations tomorrow (I just stand around with my poster for an hour and talk to anyone who comes up. Much easier) and that'll be it. Just finish my research paper after that and I'll be complete for the summer.
 

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Update.

That was certainly an experience. Long story short, it went pretty well.

I was actually called up to present sooner that I thought - I was chewing gum at the moment and didn't want to publicly throw it away.

It went all right, I actually had to speed up because I was close to going over ten minutes. Then three or four people has questions and I actually answered them pretty well.

I was sure that my voice had been shaking during the presentation - I actually don't remember much of the actual presentation (its blurry). But people said it wasn't.

But after the presentation a lot of people came up to me and told me I had done really well - but what stuck out to me most was the program director coming up to me as we left for the lunch break and telling me I had "the voice of a professor." I always thought I had a funny voice, but he said I had a very "crisp" tone.

Either I'm better than I think at speaking or I always need to talk while trying to conceal the fact that I have gum in my mouth.

He and another faculty member told me my presentation had been among the best ones.

I thought for a while the other students in my program might be giving me complients out of pity, but I actually think I may have actually done a good job.

Now just some poster presentations tomorrow (I just stand around with my poster for an hour and talk to anyone who comes up. Much easier) and that'll be it. Just finish my research paper after that and I'll be complete for the summer.
Congrats! See, we all said you'd do great and you did. Thanks again for educating people about our disorder.
 
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