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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My dad has/ had depression and (on reflection) SA although it is not something we have ever talked about. I am pretty much estranged from my small family. My dad doesn't really speak unless at a rare family gathering, and then its only chit chat, and my mum is (I feel) a bit cold and I don't really see her as a typical 'mum' type.

I think my dads mum killed herself, but again, can't be sure.

This has got to be hereditary as I remeber having some of the symptoms after leaving junior school, well before my dad's first breakdown.

I have been on meds for depression before, but came off them due to pressure from partner, weight gain and a suggestion that they were causing loss of libido (not that I ever had one, or have had one since!). I wasn't specifically diagnosed with SA, and I hadn't come across this website before. I was body dismorphic (since alleviated by cosmetic surgery), and I had only mentioned a lack of friends to the doctor.

I am sceptical about further meds, but can't see how CBT or talking about my past can really help if this was something I was born with. Does anyone have any relevant experience here?

Thanks


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Deeley,

Since heredity plays a big role in depression and SA, the science of Genetics could be our next hope.

Since 2000, when the human genome was unravelled, I have been watching the news expectantly for cures to a lot of inherited diseases.
Unfortunately very few have been discovered.

Its been 9 years since the human genome project was completed. I was expecting a lot of miracle cures. I dont understand why we havent covered a lot of distance in this field.

Since mental illness is a good candidate for cures from this research , let us hope for a cure.

Jer
 

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My dad has/ had depression and (on reflection) SA although it is not something we have ever talked about. I am pretty much estranged from my small family. My dad doesn't really speak unless at a rare family gathering, and then its only chit chat, and my mum is (I feel) a bit cold and I don't really see her as a typical 'mum' type.
Your parents sound a lot like mine.

I am sceptical about further meds, but can't see how CBT or talking about my past can really help if this was something I was born with. Does anyone have any relevant experience here?
Well I think that not many people take a purely genetic perspective of SAD. I think that the greater part of it is learned (maybe you are like me and learned it from your parents) rather than genetically inherited. Thats generally the view of most behaviour from a social psychology perspective. Only an evolutionary biologist with a complete ignorance of social psych would take the view that it is based on genetics alone and then they could not point to any gene that is the cause or any real evidence to back up this claim, its purely theoretical.

I would definitely recommend CBT...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My first memory of SA, was (I think) after leaving primary school and starting a secondary school which none of my friends went to.

All the other kids had come from three really local primary schools, and were already in their groups. I suddenly went from being a popular, normal 10 year old, to a panicking, lonely 11 year old who didn't have a clue how to interact and try to break into one of the established groups. As the years went on, I watched other girls make new friends, and groups mingled etc. but I remained on the periphery. I looked like them, was bright, attractive, wore the right clothes, but somehow, it seemed safer to mingle with the less popular people (with whom I didn't really share anything in common).

I've never really moved on from this, and college, work and current life are no different (except now I have no real friends because I can't use a phone, and I can't go out one-on-one etc.)

My point is, that at 11, I wasn't yet aware of anything wrong with my dad, as he seemed outgoing, was chairman of a charity organisation, and was always doing social stuff. His demise didn't start until I was 14/ 15 when the depression really started. If this is so, then surely it is hereditary to a greater extent?
 

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My dad has/ had depression and (on reflection) SA although it is not something we have ever talked about. I am pretty much estranged from my small family. My dad doesn't really speak unless at a rare family gathering, and then its only chit chat, and my mum is (I feel) a bit cold and I don't really see her as a typical 'mum' type.

I think my dads mum killed herself, but again, can't be sure.

This has got to be hereditary as I remeber having some of the symptoms after leaving junior school, well before my dad's first breakdown.

I have been on meds for depression before, but came off them due to pressure from partner, weight gain and a suggestion that they were causing loss of libido (not that I ever had one, or have had one since!). I wasn't specifically diagnosed with SA, and I hadn't come across this website before. I was body dismorphic (since alleviated by cosmetic surgery), and I had only mentioned a lack of friends to the doctor.

I am sceptical about further meds, but can't see how CBT or talking about my past can really help if this was something I was born with. Does anyone have any relevant experience here?

Thanks

x
Yeah, it's definitely hereditary in your case, much like it was in mine. I have also had lots of poor experiences in life that have made it even worse, and this is the case with most social anxiety sufferers.

Yes, it can be overcome. Can it be eliminated? I am not sure. But, its interference in your life can be minimized such that you can do all the things that other people do - go out and make friends, hold a job, get married, go to school, and everything else. I did this by using regular exercise, eating a healthy diet, seeing a counselor, taking a small dose of medication (which I am no longer on), journaling, taking social risks, and talking to friends when I was down or felt defeated.

It's not an easy process, but it can be overcome, and the sooner you start the better!
 

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I think certain kind of sensitiveness is hereditary. It is more likely that you develop sa when your nervous system responses to stimuli more strongly... But you can learn to cope with that sensitiveness and "be cured"
 
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