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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently working a minimum wage job, and yes, I'm grateful to have any kind of job at the moment. Because I now have my Degree in Graphic Design, I'd really like to find a job in that field while I'm going to school for my second major. I fear the outcome of my work reputation in this field because it means a lot to me, and I feel as though I won't make a very good impression with this "lovely" anxiety we all possess. Should I jump into this field with an anxiety on my hands? What ways have any of you coped with this feeling?
 

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Depressed
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I'm currently working a minimum wage job, and yes, I'm grateful to have any kind of job at the moment. Because I now have my Degree in Graphic Design, I'd really like to find a job in that field while I'm going to school for my second major. I fear the outcome of my work reputation in this field because it means a lot to me, and I feel as though I won't make a very good impression with this "lovely" anxiety we all possess. Should I jump into this field with an anxiety on my hands? What ways have any of you coped with this feeling?
I'm not sure but I think your work is the only thing that will decide if you become successful in this field. How exactly can anxiety get in the way? What do you fear?
 

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La Vie En Rose
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Most people experience some kind of anxiety related to work in general, so in a way, know that you're not alone. At my last job, a lot of my co-workers actually admitted to needing medication to manage their anxiety and panic attacks so it seems people who have intense anxiety levels aren't all that uncommon but people like to generally keep it on the down-low. Even my one instructor said she took meds at first because she was determined to have a career.

Now I'm not trying to advocate medication at all, just stating that some people use it to help cope. Some just temporarily as a boost, until they become more familiar with their job duties and surroundings, that they become comfortable and don't need to rely on pills. But I do want to say, don't let anxiety hold you back from pursuing your career. You're very blessed you found something you love to do! I think a reasonable manager and team wouldn't care so much about your anxiety, but whether it affects your quality of work. If it doesn't affect the quality of your work or your worth ethic, than it's okay:) Your work will speak for itself.

It kind of reminds me of this little story I found on some article for job hunting tips for people with anxiety:

My husband, also a psychologist, tells the story of his first interview for a psychologist position with a juvenile court. He was so nervous that his hands were shaking. The more he tried to appear calm, the worse it became. The interviewer asked him how he would do in court testimony given how anxious he appeared. Greg responded: "You're right, I am very nervous because I really want this job. I would love this work and I have great training in this area. I believe I would do well in court--even though I'm visibly nervous today, I have still been able to answer all your questions appropriately." He got the job, and that is how he started his career.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not sure but I think your work is the only thing that will decide if you become successful in this field. How exactly can anxiety get in the way? What do you fear?
More than anything, the communication aspect. I stumble over my words when I talk at times, and it's out of fear of saying the wrong things so I sometimes end up saying things that don't convey my points very well. I'm a graphic designer, so I'm going to need to talk about the projects I've done and receive feedback. The work itself isn't all that daunting, even though I still have much to learn about my field. That's a plus at least. :/
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It shouldn't be harder than in school. I haven't studied graphic design but jobs usually require less skill than getting the degree.
I sure hope so! Lol. Most businesses I've seen so far write out their job postings as if they want so much more than what I've learned in school. I guess that could just be their way of trying to see whose brave enough to apply for something that sounds more daunting than what it is. :blank
 

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Depressed
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I sure hope so! Lol. Most businesses I've seen so far write out their job postings as if they want so much more than what I've learned in school. I guess that could just be their way of trying to see whose brave enough to apply for something that sounds more daunting than what it is. :blank
You will have to find a job in this field and it could be better to wait but only if you will try to improve something meanwhile. Otherwise it's just wasted time.
I really think you should be confident after getting your degree. I have always been interested in visual arts but my inability to talk about my work limited me to being a self thought artist and it can also only be a hobby because of this. You already passed what I would consider the biggest barrier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You will have to find a job in this field and it could be better to wait but only if you will try to improve something meanwhile. Otherwise it's just wasted time.
I really think you should be confident after getting your degree. I have always been interested in visual arts but my inability to talk about my work limited me to being a self thought artist and it can also only be a hobby because of this. You already passed what I would consider the biggest barrier.
Good point. :) I suppose I could spend more time polishing my portfolio, and improving my web coding capabilities so I feel more applicable. Maybe if I do a few things on my own terms, it will show people how dedicated I am.

Thank you. Seriously. Talking about this has helped me a lot already.

I still think of some art mediums as a hobby, which I don't think is a bad thing. :) The demand of creating something for someone else is much higher, so it's definitely considered more enjoyable to do it when it's more for you. It's hard to divide yourself from your work, but essential and a learning process when it's a career.
 

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Depressed
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I'm glad it helped.

Yes, it's nice when it's just a hobby. You have all the freedom: no demands, no deadlines, no pressure. It's just about keeping yourself happy about the result. But you still need money, and if you can't turn something you like into a job, you will most likely end up having a s***ty one.
 
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