Social Anxiety Support Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Thanks
 

·
SAS Veteran
Joined
·
1,841 Posts
You can get some great info online for taking care of dogs. Search something like "caring for your dog" "caring for "pit bulls". You should find some good articles.:D
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
577 Posts
Well what's the story? How'd you end up with him? I love pitbulls, imo they're one of the best, albeit sadly one of the most misunderstood, dogs on earth. Just remember that a dog is half a child, and it needs utmost love and attention, especially if you are it's master. Walk it, train it, give it loving attention, and spend as much time with it as possible.

And that's a beautiful dog. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
My dogs always look sad too when they're not getting attention. It's something about their eyes I think. I have three dogs, and the biggest, a yellow lab, cries and howls whenever I leave the house. I can still hear him by the time I reach the corner. My son has been home when I've been gone, and said the dog keeps crying and looking out the window the entire time I'm gone. When I return I get a greeting like I've been gone for months or years even. He does that even if I just go out to get the mail. Dogs, like people, have an endless need for love -- that's what makes them so wonderful. :O)
 

·
Too School for Cool
Joined
·
6,857 Posts
I've heard puppies are supposed to meet 100 people and 100 other dogs in their first few months to be properly socialized. I'd make sure to take him to parks and dog walks so he is used to other dogs and people beside your family.

Is there training classes in your area? When my dog was a puppy there was a nightschool training class which we took him to which helped, I think, and he also got to meet a lot of dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,433 Posts
Dogs are pack animals. They fail to understand why we exclude them from being with us in some circumstances. Making a puppy stay by itself at night for example from the puppy's point of view means you hate it, it's not part of the pack, and it's at risk of being abandoned to die. That's why it's so cruel to leave dogs along for most of the day or penned up outside. I'm sure I don't need to tell anyone on here what it's like to be confined to the house with no social interaction. Dogs are the same as us. They need to interact, they need friends, and they need to learn dog social skills. If a puppy is never around other dogs they don't know how to act and they make a fool of themselves potentially causing an accidental fight or becoming fearful and acting agressive to try to scare the other dog off before it can harm them. Socializing is one of the most important things you can do with your puppy or young dog.

That doesn't mean you need to share your space 24/7 and take them with everywhere when it might not be safe for them. Don't expect them to be happy left alone at home though. I've been fostering rescue dogs while we have a rule of no dogs on the bed without permission(which is almost never) all of the puppies sleep in crates near our bed so they are part of the pack and not alone but kept from destroying and peeing on things. I'd also do that with an older dog if I only had one. When you have 3 or 4 you can just put them in crates near each other or together in a seperate room and they'll keep each other company while you sleep. My akita was my first dog after moving out on my own and has her own bed at the foot of my bed. If someone wasn't home most of the day we would hire a dog walker or take them to dog daycare so they are not left alone all day long. That also helps socialize them. The more strangers and strange dogs they meet with a positive outcome the better they will be around other people and dogs.

Dog obedience classes are a very good idea. They can get your dog used to other people and dogs while teaching basic useful commands. It will help your dog understand you better and learn the rules of the house so it is less likely to start any behaviors you dislike. So long as you find a good class dogs also absolutely love to go to dog class and get extremely excited and happy when they know it's time to leave for class.

Also check out http://dogfoodanalysis.com/ and http://www.dogfoodproject.com/ for information on feeding and different brands of dog food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Just remember that a dog is half a child, and it needs utmost love and attention
Only half? No, my pug IS my second child. He is with me at all times when I am home, but that is pugs for you. He doesn't have the temper tantrums my 4 year old has though, and he doesn't get saucy when he doesn't get his own way!

As for caring for a dog, well since it is new, you really should spend as much time as possible with him. He needs to get to know you, your schedule, his surroundings and what is expected of him. Honestly, right now, YOU should be walking him, doing all of his care, just until he is more settled and he knows you are boss.

Dogs need to be with you- they aren't like cats, they need you with them and they don't understand why you might leave for long periods. That is why they need to learn your schedule, but when you get home you should make time for them right away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I am going to echo what someone else asked: why did you get this dog when you have no idea to how to care for him? Where did you get him? And do you at least know to get him neutered and vaccinated?

Second of all pit bulls are dog-aggressive dogs. This means that they were originally bred to fight other dogs but on the other hand to show great bite inhibition toward humans. Unfortunately, that also means that as pit bulls mature they begin showing what they were truly bred for and it will no longer be possible to take him to a dog park. Just in case he does accidentally get into a fight, you need to know how to break it up. I highly suggest visiting this forum: http://www.pitbullforum.com/index.php and ask your questions there.

For training, do not use negative reinforcement. It needs to be positive. When he behaves in a manner that you like or does something that you like (ie poops outside) praise him like crazy. When he chews on something you do not want him chewing on, give him something that he can chew instead and reward him when he does. Do not leave him in a crate for hours on end but also make the crate a good place to be, like a den that he can go into should he want some time alone. Put his favorite toys in there and reward him for going in. This makes it so that your dog won't make a big fuss out of having to be in his crate for a little while.

Pit bulls are also working dogs. They need plenty of exercise and playtime, puppies especially. This means walking your dog every single day, and frequently whether you want to or not.

You may want to check this growing FAQ thread on training puppies here: http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3155257 and similarly, their megathread on pet food.

Lastly, you might also want to set aside at least $1000 for vet emergencies.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
577 Posts
Second of all pit bulls are dog-aggressive dogs. This means that they were originally bred to fight other dogs but on the other hand to show great bite inhibition toward humans. Unfortunately, that also means that as pit bulls mature they begin showing what they were truly bred for and it will no longer be possible to take him to a dog park. Just in case he does accidentally get into a fight, you need to know how to break it up. I highly suggest visiting this forum: http://www.pitbullforum.com/index.php and ask your questions there.
I don't believe that. I have a half pitbull/half chow chow that can get along absolutely fine with most any other animal. And lets not forget MANY dogs were originally bred for fighting, including the british bulldog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I don't believe that. I have a half pitbull/half chow chow that can get along absolutely fine with most any other animal. And lets not forget MANY dogs were originally bred for fighting, including the british bulldog.
Seeing as your dog is a mix I wouldn't doubt the gene that controls dog aggression isn't there. Either that, or he doesn't have pit in him at all. It is absolutely true that they are dog-aggressive dogs and is the very reason why illegal dog fighting still exists and why so many people misunderstand pit bulls.

If you have a pit bull and think taking one to the dog park is ok you are going to be in deep trouble, especially if you don't know how to safely break up a fight: http://www.pitbullforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=50274
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,433 Posts
Calling a whole breed dog aggressive is tricky. I don't think that exact term should be applied to any dog that hasn't proven to be dangerous toward other dogs. I have an akita and much experience with this "dog aggressive" breed. Akitas were used for dog fighting at one time in history. The term is not at all accurate. They are dominant, they like their space, and they are protective. This means they react strongly to strange dogs being in their space and possibly a threat to their territory or pack. If they are properly socialized an akita is not going to seek out other dogs and attack them. Same with a pitbull or any other breed. It's abuse or just poor socialization and training that causes a dog to react like that. They will stand their ground, they will grumble, and they will show that they are boss but only to dogs that charge into their space and won't back off or who threaten them first. My akita does fine at the dog park so long as no other dog starts something with her. The problem is a poorly socialized dog with such personality traits reacts to everything. Mine has been going to dog classes, the dog park, and pet stores since I got her at 4months and was traveling other places with the breeder since she was 6weeks. I also raised her with many animals around and taught her what was proper behavior and what was too rough. She will not apply more force than is necessary and will not bite unless bitten. She will growl, she will knock other dogs down, she will push them out of her space, but unless they attack her she will not break skin.

Dogs that are not socialized and have the same traits as akitas or "dog aggressive" breeds will not react with that much control and they will not recognize a threat from a nonthreat. They will see every dog as an intruder to their space and not realize some dogs can be friends. Every strange object someone carries is a possible weapon to them. Every person can look like a possible threat. Every unfamiliar situation may be dangerous. They are always ready to defend if necessary. That's what I like about them but if you don't teach them when it's not necessary by showing them many situations and letting them interact with other dogs and people then they will be too quick to defend and apply more force than needed to get their point across. If they have no idea how hard of bite causes injury then they will just bite as hard as they can which will cause serious injuries and gets a bad name in the media. My dog has been in fights (all started by other dogs) and she has not done serious damage despite the fact she really could. Normally in play her mouth never applies more force than would cause a scratch. One day while I was wearing a thick long sleeve shirt she grabbed my arm in her excitement without realizing what she was grabbing. In the split second until she realized it and despite the fact I moved my arm with her to minimize the force she had torn 3 grooves across the bottom of my forearm and crushed the bones together until I thought she was going to break them. All it takes is 1 mistake from a dog like that and they get branded as aggressive or dangerous even when they are normally very nicely tempered and even if they get along with 90% of the dog and human population. Which is why it falls on the owners of such breeds to show their dogs how to behave.

If I could I would make every dog owner take their dog to at least 6-8 positive motivation oriented obedience classes. It would solve many of our problems with dog attacks, lessen (possibly greatly) owner surrenders to shelters, and dog neglect or abuse cases.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
577 Posts
Seeing as your dog is a mix I wouldn't doubt the gene that controls dog aggression isn't there. Either that, or he doesn't have pit in him at all. It is absolutely true that they are dog-aggressive dogs and is the very reason why illegal dog fighting still exists and why so many people misunderstand pit bulls.
She absolutely IS half-pit as i knew her mother's owner as a personal friend of ours and knew the whole litter, and i know she's also half chow chow (another allegedly "dog-aggressive dog") as her father was often stray and known to be messing around and impregnating other female dogs plus she has black spots on her tongue, and chows are the only breed of dogs with black tongues. I can honestly say neither she nor any other dog in that litter have ever displayed any aggressive tendencies towards any other dogs, and i have not seen too many pits in general be any aggressive towards other animals, period. They do have the strongest jaws and the biggest determination to hold on and never let go, which is a major advantage in the world of dogs abused from birth and forced to be mean and hostile towards anything other than their cruel and abusive owner.

Don't fall for this false reputation y'all, a dog is a dog no matter what form it comes in.
 

·
Retired Enforcer
Joined
·
19,108 Posts
Some dogs are bred for specific traits. i.e fighting, hunting etc. Individual dogs may not display these traits. I used to have a Basenji with a white mark that they were trying to breed out. He was designated as "pet quality" and neutered before being sold to prevent him breeding. He was a fine dog and an excellent specimen and exhibited all the other characterisics that the breed was noted for.

Dogs are pack animals and need to be around their "pack". This means you! You will also need to assert your position as the alpha of the pack. You can do this simply by wrestling with the dog, rolling him onto his back and gripping his throat firmly while looking into his eyes. Release him once he accepts your dominance and relaxes. You can also use this technique to help train him. Reward positive behavior and punish bad behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,433 Posts
There are about 5 breeds that can have solid black tongues. Shar pei (closely related to chow) and husky come to mind. As for black spots the list is more like 20-30. You can find a full list along with pics of purebred, most of them registered, dogs of various breeds with black spots on the tongue if you just go searching. We adopted a dog that the shelter said was part chow just based on his black tongue because of the myth that only chows have black tongues. He is not chow. He shows no traits at all and I even had several very knowledgeable friends compare his skeletal structure to find that even if you ignore most of his external features like muzzle shape, coat color, size, etc... he does not have a single indicator of chow. Everything short of a genetic test (which can be done) says he's not chow. Our guess is he's husky x german shepherd.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
577 Posts
Nah i've seen my dog's father and he's all chow. Just trying to prove a point that this stereotype of pitbulls is false. I've had dachsunds (wiener dogs) before too and they might display aggression 9 outta 10 times but in their case it's all cutesy cute and a minor annoyance at worst but if a big dog does it once it's headline news and if it's a pitbull then it's oh-no-keep-the-kids-inside-and-have-the-gov't-outlaw-the-whole-breed.
 

·
Retired Enforcer
Joined
·
19,108 Posts
Dachshunds were originally bred to hunt badgers, one of the meanest, nastiest critters there is. The were bred to be short so that they could go down the hole after the badger without getting their front legs chewed off. The aggression was also bred into them but is being bred out since they are now considered to be cutesy pets instead of hunting dogs.

I have known pit bulls that were the biggest babies and want nothing more than a tummy rub and a full food dish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
She absolutely IS half-pit as i knew her mother's owner as a personal friend of ours and knew the whole litter, and i know she's also half chow chow (another allegedly "dog-aggressive dog") as her father was often stray and known to be messing around and impregnating other female dogs plus she has black spots on her tongue, and chows are the only breed of dogs with black tongues. I can honestly say neither she nor any other dog in that litter have ever displayed any aggressive tendencies towards any other dogs, and i have not seen too many pits in general be any aggressive towards other animals, period. They do have the strongest jaws and the biggest determination to hold on and never let go, which is a major advantage in the world of dogs abused from birth and forced to be mean and hostile towards anything other than their cruel and abusive owner.

Don't fall for this false reputation y'all, a dog is a dog no matter what form it comes in.
Look, all I am doing is giving straight-up facts about what reputable breeders have to say. I am not one of those crazy people that think pits are overly aggressive, but even responsible owners of the breed have experience dog aggression with them because that is simply what they were bred to do. What is false reputation is people thinking pit bulls are human-aggressive when in fact when the breed was first being established, pits who bit their handler even during mid-fight were culled. The result is an extremely loyal and friendly breed in regards to humans but also one that is dog aggressive and you cannot train that out of them. It's in their genes and because of that, once a pit bull grows to a certain age dog parks are no longer a good idea.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
577 Posts
I understand what you are saying, but from my personal experience with my own dog and with others of that type i've never seen them more particularly aggressive towards other dogs than any other breed. I think for all dogs in general socializing them and training them when young to get along with other animals in general is crucial, unless you live in a very rural or urban area and need them as guard dogs to keep wild animals or predators out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I understand what you are saying, but from my personal experience with my own dog and with others of that type i've never seen them more particularly aggressive towards other dogs than any other breed. I think for all dogs in general socializing them and training them when young to get along with other animals in general is crucial, unless you live in a very rural or urban area and need them as guard dogs to keep wild animals or predators out.
Exactly right; I'm definitely not saying that the OP shouldn't socialize his/her puppy, and it's true, any dog could break into a fight with another dog. It's just that given with the history of the breed, some at a certain age will no longer look to other dogs as friends and that has nothing to do with how well you have trained him.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top