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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.

Here's my story.
I recently started teachers college. The thing is, I have SA, when speaking infront of people (more than 3 or 4). This program that I started requires presentations almost daily. I have never been on any kinds of medication before and my doctor advised me that benzos are completely out of consideration and SSRIs will take at least 6 weeks to start "working" and that's only after a little bit of trial period to see if the drug is right for me.

So I turn to CBT as an option. I am thinking about starting CBT sessions. How well do they work? Can you ever become "normal"?

Also, my family tells me that "everyone gets anxious when they give presentations" and that if I keep plugging away, I will eventually be able to do it naturally. My brother swears by this saying that he had similar problems in the past. My question is if this is really true, or whether I should wait until I see a professional therapist and take the approach more systematically and step by step, rather than being thrown into the ocean by continuing my education program. I'm seriously contemplating withdrawing from the program all together
 

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Withdrawing or going through with it is your option altogether. If it were me, I would continue to go through with it, even though the going would be quite rough. While going through it though, keep in mind that you can't do it by yourself and that you need the support of others. Keep talking to friends, family, and counselors (if you choose to talk to counselors, which can be very helpful) about your fears and challenges. Medication can help a ton too, and I don't know the specifics, but you can get anxiety meds that work for 4 hours or so at a time when needed, and I am on one that is a generic version of Xanax, and it helps.

Sometimes, it can be good to take a break and just get away from it all, if this becomes too much, but then again if you push through it, you'll have gained a ton of experience and more than likely the anxiety will never be this bad again.

Your family is right when they say that everyone is anxious when they give presentations, although some learn to relax better than others. Eventually, you can and will learn if you stick with it, and then some day you'll be like, "Now, what was I so scared of in the first place?" It takes some time to develop that level of competency, but it does happen if you keep working at it. What you do with this is your choice, but hopefully some information has been presented that will help to clarify which choice is right for you at this moment. Good luck and be sure to continue to ask for help as you need it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply.
I noticed a strange phenomenon today.
I was thinking to myself...my presentation anxiety is so profound and so crippling....and other people are having similar anxieties in their everyday lives (not just on stage) such was when they are crossing an intersection, entering restaurants and interacting interpersonally....all of which I don't suffer from...

and I got to thinking...SHOULDN'T I be afraid of those things too? They're pretty much the same things if you think about it...being afraid how others might judge you...how you might make a silly mistake and not knowing what others will think of you....SHOULDN'T they be the same thing? and of course because I basically have anxiety all the time now because of my stage fright ...I got to being confused where my anxiety is coming from. That is...I'm literally becoming anxious about developing another anxiety, another phobia. Do people suddenly (or gradually) develop anxieties/phobias to different things this far into adulthood? (I'm 27 by the way)

And the next time I slip on a banana peel while walking into a restaurant...is that going to create a whole new phobia? How can I be sure of it?
 

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Hello everyone.

Here's my story.
I recently started teachers college. The thing is, I have SA, when speaking infront of people (more than 3 or 4). This program that I started requires presentations almost daily. I have never been on any kinds of medication before and my doctor advised me that benzos are completely out of consideration and SSRIs will take at least 6 weeks to start "working" and that's only after a little bit of trial period to see if the drug is right for me.

So I turn to CBT as an option. I am thinking about starting CBT sessions. How well do they work? Can you ever become "normal"?

Also, my family tells me that "everyone gets anxious when they give presentations" and that if I keep plugging away, I will eventually be able to do it naturally. My brother swears by this saying that he had similar problems in the past. My question is if this is really true, or whether I should wait until I see a professional therapist and take the approach more systematically and step by step, rather than being thrown into the ocean by continuing my education program. I'm seriously contemplating withdrawing from the program all together
You might get better results if you withdraw and go through the cbt and let the drugs kick in, ex. less stress and more focused learning for you and your students. However, I think and know first hand through experience in student teaching and public speaking that if you challenge yourself to speak, you can succeed without any counseling or meds.
 

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Well, something small like slipping on a banana peel will probably not cause a phobia, even for someone like you who is in an anxious frame of mind. I believe that yes, you can develop an anxiety condition at practically any time in life, but generally if anxiety isn't present by the time of young adulthood, 18-22 or so, you won't get it unless there is a fairly significant traumatic event in your life. For example, you get in a nasty car crash and are scared of driving after that. For what its worth, it seems that the anxiety that results from traumatic events in later adulthood is much easier to get over and move on from than the kind of anxiety that is with you ever since you can remember.

This information might not be what you want to hear, but if I were you, I would not worry about other types of anxiety becoming a problem because it happens that way only very rarely. And, just the fact that you are trying to make yourself aware of these different anxieties gives you another layer of protection from any more anxiety coming in. You'll be okay, and just focus on what it is that you do have right now, rather than what might be. Good luck and hang in there, and as always, ask if you have further questions!
 

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Hello everyone.

Here's my story.
I recently started teachers college. The thing is, I have SA, when speaking infront of people (more than 3 or 4). This program that I started requires presentations almost daily. I have never been on any kinds of medication before and my doctor advised me that benzos are completely out of consideration and SSRIs will take at least 6 weeks to start "working" and that's only after a little bit of trial period to see if the drug is right for me.

So I turn to CBT as an option. I am thinking about starting CBT sessions. How well do they work? Can you ever become "normal"?

Also, my family tells me that "everyone gets anxious when they give presentations" and that if I keep plugging away, I will eventually be able to do it naturally. My brother swears by this saying that he had similar problems in the past. My question is if this is really true, or whether I should wait until I see a professional therapist and take the approach more systematically and step by step, rather than being thrown into the ocean by continuing my education program. I'm seriously contemplating withdrawing from the program all together
you can use cbt to find out what exactly it is that you are scared of. when you know this you can put your thinking into perspective.

www.thinkrightnow.com have a great cd for public speaking

u can use nlp to help get urself into a positive stae when giving a presentation , a great technique is ''anchoring ''
 
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