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My doctor did the standard blood tests for thyroid disorders when i told her i was having major anxiety. the only thing abnormal about my blood was that i had low blood sugar, which was weird because i had breakfast only an hour earlier. I looked deeper into low blood sugar and discovered hypoglycemia. Many of the symptoms of this i have. The two most prominent: anxiety and excessive daytime sleepiness (a little bit different than fatigue. When your tired, you feel like you want to sleep until you do. excessive daytime sleepiness is where you all of the sudden, out of nowhere, get an unresistable urge to sleep. like you physically cant stop yourself from sleeping. i fall asleep 3-4 times in class a day and have stopped trying to stay awake. i now just accept that im gunna fall asleep and hope that ill stop feeling tired soon). some more symptoms that i found connect with what i feel are: irritability upon waking (not a morning person to the extreme), confusion (long story), constant desire for sweets, depression (only sometimes), drowsiness, and impaired mental function, constant hunger.

Im definitely going to ask my doctor about this.
 

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I have this, but it reacts differently with me. In the afternoons or after too many carbs (a couple hours after anyway) I get really dizzy feeling and tired. I just drink some OJ mixed with a bit of sugar and I will be fine in ten minutes.

Usually though I just do the mini meals all through the day thing, so it doesn't happen at all.
 

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Is this like a sugar crash? ie after you eat a lot of sugar, your insulin levels spike, which then cause your blood sugar levels to drop too low, causing tiredness.

My energy levels stay more constant if I eat a lot of protein in the morning.
 

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I'm assuming there's no diabetes medications involved here directly causing your hypoglycemia. Weird. Did your doc offer any explanation? Here's some stuff I came up with in a minute of research:

Reactive hypoglycemia, also called postprandial hypoglycemia, occurs within 4 hours after meals.

Diagnosis
To diagnose reactive hypoglycemia, the doctor may

* ask about signs and symptoms
* test blood glucose while the patient is having symptoms by taking a blood sample from the arm and sending it to a laboratory for analysis*
* check to see whether the symptoms ease after the patient’s blood glucose returns to 70 mg/dL or above after eating or drinking

A blood glucose level below 70 mg/dL at the time of symptoms and relief after eating will confirm the diagnosis. The oral glucose tolerance test is no longer used to diagnose reactive hypoglycemia because experts now know the test can actually trigger hypoglycemic symptoms.

Causes and Treatment
The causes of most cases of reactive hypoglycemia are still open to debate. Some researchers suggest that certain people may be more sensitive to the body’s normal release of the hormone epinephrine, which causes many of the symptoms of hypoglycemia. Others believe deficiencies in glucagon secretion might lead to reactive hypoglycemia.

A few causes of reactive hypoglycemia are certain, but they are uncommon. Gastric—or stomach—surgery can cause reactive hypoglycemia because of the rapid passage of food into the small intestine. Rare enzyme deficiencies diagnosed early in life, such as hereditary fructose intolerance, also may cause reactive hypoglycemia.

To relieve reactive hypoglycemia, some health professionals recommend

* eating small meals and snacks about every 3 hours
* being physically active
* eating a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, or nonmeat sources of protein; starchy foods such as whole-grain bread, rice, and potatoes; fruits; vegetables; and dairy products
* eating foods high in fiber
* avoiding or limiting foods high in sugar, especially on an empty stomach

The doctor can refer patients to a registered dietitian for personalized meal planning advice. Although some health professionals recommend a diet high in protein and low in carbohydrates, studies have not proven the effectiveness of this kind of diet to treat reactive hypoglycemia.
 
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