Social Anxiety Support Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,478 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A client of mine wants to sell her computer. I have been backing up her files, and cleaning it out. I noticed here name is on the register to in my computer properties. I was wondering how to change her name? This is HIPPA privacy issue. I can't sell this computer with her name on it. I was told to change it in the registry, but all it lists is the stupid OEM number. I hope I can change this without reinstalling Windows XP. Please help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,478 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
theysee said:
you should 'low level format' (sometimes called "zero fill") the hard drive & then reinstall windows before selling the computer. there are free programs available such as Darik's Boot and Nuke or a utilility from the hard drive manufacturer. (also free)

just deleting the files does not remove them from the hard drive, nor does a regular reformat & reinstall of the OS, it only removes the files from the hard drive directory the actual data is still there. anyone who has the inclination can recover the files that were "deleted" in this manner.

low level formating is the only way to be sure the drive is wiped of all personal information.
There wasn't anything confidential on it. She just had music and some pitures. She only had the machine for 2 monthes. The only thing is I have to remove her name from the register to. I just found out I can go into the registry and change it. Thanks for your help anyway. :thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,144 Posts
theysee said:
low level formating is the only way to be sure the drive is wiped of all personal information.
Sorry, no. Magnetic traces still remain and all the data can be recovered with the right tools. The only way to secure-wipe a hard drive is to open it up and use sandpaper on each of the platters.

copper said:
I can go into the registry and change it.
I was about to suggest that :)

-Ryan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,478 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Kardax said:
theysee said:
low level formating is the only way to be sure the drive is wiped of all personal information.
Sorry, no. Magnetic traces still remain and all the data can be recovered with the right tools. The only way to secure-wipe a hard drive is to open it up and use sandpaper on each of the platters.

copper said:
I can go into the registry and change it.
I was about to suggest that :)

-Ryan
The two people that are interested in buying it can barely turn on a computer. I don't think they are sophisicated enough to do this. :lol
 

·
Comfortably Numb
Joined
·
347 Posts
A program called "Tweak-XP Pro" has an option for this. The spot to change this is on "Windows Tweaks" -> "Windows Tweaks I" -> "Miscelleanous Tweaks" Then on the bottom is called "Windows User Information". If you have trouble locating the software drop me a PM and i'll get you a link for it. I can also explain how to change it in the registry but this is a much safer way of doing it.

Decided to include a link to change it via the registry. http://support.microsoft.com/default.as ... US;Q310441
 

·
Comfortably Numb
Joined
·
347 Posts
Off subject but there is ways to destroy all evidence from a hard drive without destroying the drive. Usually forensics will tell you recovery is generally possible. While this is true, it all depends on various factors. The easiest way to understand it is to take a look at what happens when you delete a file. After you delete a file the PC basically tells itself it can overwrite any information where the file you deleted is stored. So technically speaking, the file never gets deleted it just gets a note stating "safe to overwrite". When a forensic analysis is done on a hard drive it basically rebuilds the file from deleted sectors. For instance, a computer forensics lab will usually be able to restore only a percentage of a file. This is because part of the sectors may have been overwritten by other data. In order to safely delete a file with no chances of recovery one would delete the file and overwrite junk data in each sector the file used. Once this happens, not even the world’s best computer forensics lab could restore the file.

There are "file shredders" available on the market that do just this. The best write data 5-10 times on the sectors where the data is stored. This is a flawless way at destroying a file. The DoD, FBI and CIA all use this technique to assure the file is indeed gone. Destroying all data on a hard drive using this method can take hours.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top