Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a sophomore in High School, and I have a problem with my nerves. When I get nervous I get a horrible pain in my stomach. Every time I leave my parents or experience something new by myself I get a bad stomach ache. I feel like I can't leave the bathroom because I feel like I'm going to throw up. I've coped with my nerves by not doing anything. I make up excuses to my friends to get out of doing things. I'm scared that as I get older it's not going to go away and I'm never going to experience the things that other people experience. I recently got a boyfriend and he wants to go out to see a movie and I'm nervous to go. I don't want to say no because it could end our relationship. How do I get rid of the pain so I can do daily activities that other teens experience? Is this something that can be treated by a doctor?
 

·
Angst Abolition
Joined
·
440 Posts
"When I get nervous I get a horrible pain in my stomach"

What happens if you stretch out your stomach for a few minutes, accompanied with some deep breathing? (check out some yoga poses or something?)

"I've coped with my nerves by not doing anything"

This is actually the right track. At least for me. I usually mentally accept it, and then engage in some deep, slow, breathing. Also, if I have the chance, I go to a bathroom and do a shaking exercise where I bend at the knees slightly, and rapidly bounce up and down without letting my feet leave the ground. I let everything loose, as well (the most important part)...this is similar to the first phase of dynamic yoga. I just do it quicker, and don't exaggerate actions as much:


"I make up excuses to my friends to get out of doing things. I'm scared that as I get older it's not going to go away and I'm never going to experience the things that other people experience."

I have these same fears...a lot. Slowly work on accepting them, but than asking yourself "What if I CAN experience what other people can?" on a consistent basis. Believe it or not, consistently asking "what if" questions can begin to stimulate growth and a positive mentality. At least for me. But it takes time, and it must be done consistently.

"I recnetly got a boyfriend and he wantst o go out to see a movie and I'm nervous to go. I don't want to say no because it could end our relationship"

1. If he is your boyfriend, and he intends to remain loyal, being honest with him about your intense anxious struggles will only benefit the relationship. Not only may he then understand why you won't go, but you may want to go all the more because you know he understands and acknowledges your struggles.

Aside from that, you could try coping with the ways I suggested. Focus on becoming aware of your unhelpful anticipatory thoughts. That will help too.

What do you think?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
110 Posts
getting rid of your nerves...sounds like a long and extremely difficult surgical procedure and I wouldn't personally recommend it.
to be serious, I would say you should try cognitive behavioral therapy combined with medication. That helped me a whole bunch
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top