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How I do I get into coding? Reading links off of google isn't enough for me cause I pretty much forget everything. There are classes offered at my community college for this but I'm not sure, havent looked far into it yet. Mainly because I'm looking to find out if coding is for me or not. Its sound like an ideal job for me with sad because I'm already used to sitting on a computer all day, and (at least I get the impression) that socializing won't heavily needed. But after some googling coding looks tough and im not sure if Im up for it. Im thinking about a computer science major but dunno if this is really for me or not..

My math skills are below college algebra, I'm not mechanically inclined, problem solving skills I'm not too sure. How would I fare

What different kinds of task do you do as a coder and what are you expected to know? This is kind of like my ideal job because I'm used to sitting on the computer and I prefer minimal social interaction(sa).. so if codings not for me then what other kinds of jobs can i take that involve the computer?
 

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There are better things to do if you are starting from scratch. CS and other complex programming is not easy. And there is a lot of competition for jobs that aren't very fun. Read some stories about EA programmers... http://ea-spouse.livejournal.com/274.html?page=32

If you want to try it and have some fun on your own, try Python. Or look into writing Android or iPhone apps. It isn't exactly easy though.
 

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Honestly I don't know if I'd start with Python, because its not heavily used in the workplace. I'd start with a language like C or C++. Anyways its one thing to wanna work with computers and technology, but programming isn't always what people expect, and honestly I don't think its something everyone has a natural aptitude for. I kind of like the saying that you can teach someone to draw, but not everyone can be an artist and the same applies to programming in my opinion. I'd look at getting some beginning programming books and also seeing if your community college has programming classes to see if you like it or not. As far as the math goes, it kind of depends what kind of programming your doing as to how much math you'll actually need. Some programming requires very little math. However know that almost any Computer Science curriculum is going to be somewhat math intensive. As far as the work environment, you may have to work on a team with other programmers, and you may have to do some presentations.
 

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I would echo what Silent mentioned, that like certain artistic endeavours you either have what it takes or don't. But don't let this put you off, providing you have an interest in problem solving and logic (and some good old fashioned perseverance) you should make it. ;)

There are also various areas of programming, each with their own innate levels of complexity and expertise. (which I'm sure allows alot of people to find their own particular niche)

A very quick and rough run down-

Web programming: You'll hear people in this field mentioning 'web apps', as to what they're designing. Essentially this means elaborate websites (think facebook etc.) that act alot like normal everyday programs. Some might not realise it but coding plays a big part here, epecially with databases, multiple requests (concurrency) and security. The other major side to this area is undoubtedly presentation. In larger projects there will be a dedicated team to do this, in smaller ones you may need to chip in with some graphical design/photoshopping.

Mobile Apps: Android, Iphone etc. This tends to be heavily linked with web areas. Especially given the rise in social media. So you may need some understanding of web technologies on top. The downside about this, is that you need a different language for each platform. Android -> Java, Iphone -> Objective C etc.

Enterprise level Applications: Software designed for corporations either for inhouse use or to be sold. Usually work in teams with a very specific design ethos / techniques (Agile, Scrum, Extreme Programming)

Computer Games: The geek's holy grail lol :b Needs alot of expertise however. No short cuts, need a good knowledge of relatively hard languages. Low level manipulation, which can even go down to assembly to gain a performance boost on set hardware specifications (consoles)

Low level: Stuff like hardware drivers, and embeded software (software for machinery). This area makes baby Jesus cry - the stuff of nightmares for the uninitiated :b Very difficult, but pays oh so well.
 
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