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I'm doing that.

I see it in myself, in how I talk or type to people I interacted with over time.

I might of emailed or call someone 4 months ago, and on that day was like "Hey!!! Blah blah!!!! Me too! Sure!!! Thank You!!!", but then 4 months later they catch me on a off day and I'm like "oh hi".

Then I "catch myself', cause they don't know. So they might be like, "why did he change from last time?".

So long story short, to "not allow this to happen" I sorta formed this "Fake Hi! Hi!" literally 24/7, like I'm doing customer service. Like it's a job.

Anyway I'm just talking out loud.
 

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insert witty comment here
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Reminds me of reaction formation. It's a defense mechanism.

Usually, defense mechanisms are used to deal with taxing situations but your social facade seems to be a similar enough phenomenon.

From wiki: In psychoanalytic theory, reaction formation (German: Reaktionsbildung) is a defense mechanism in which emotions and impulses which are anxiety-producing or perceived to be unacceptable are mastered by exaggeration of the directly opposing tendency.
 

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bipolar
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Reminds me of reaction formation. It's a defense mechanism.

Usually, defense mechanisms are used to deal with taxing situations but your social facade seems to be a similar enough phenomenon.

From wiki: In psychoanalytic theory, reaction formation (German: Reaktionsbildung) is a defense mechanism in which emotions and impulses which are anxiety-producing or perceived to be unacceptable are mastered by exaggeration of the directly opposing tendency.
Sounds like what I've been doing all my life.

I tend to always underplay whatever problems I have or how bad I'm feeling. Probably a few good reasons there why it started a long time ago but it's a hard habit to break.

Even my doctor said just recently she's just now realising what I'm like - I always pretend I'm okay.
 

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Loathed Loiterer
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I've long learned that people who look happy on the outside often times can be pretty sad on the inside. While those who look non-upbeat and even sad, are actually pretty happy and content. I witnessed first hand a few times with some good intention people tried reaching out to the non-happy looking people only to find out they are actually very happy. They just don't express themselves much on the outside.

As for hiding unhappiness, I do this a lot growing up. Every time I looked upset when I am indeed upset, I get yelled at for it because my mom always thinks me looking upset is directed at her. So she sees me not looking happy as offensive and it's my way to attack her passive aggressively. So I will always force myself to put up a front of looking happy and cheerful even when I am sad. It sure was very bad for one's mental health doing this on the long run. Especially for a kid.

One of my aunts (a toxic one) was like that too to my cousin who's the same age as me. Every time he looked sad, she will physically slapped him. I still remember she slapped him one time when we were both sitting on the backseat when he frowned for some reason. Not sure how he's doing now, but he ended up having some mental issues and also major anger issues throughout high school and college. Quite a few times back then, their neighbors called the police on him because he often times will scream threatening to "kill" her. Last few times I saw him, which was like a few times in the past 10 years, he will sit in the backyard with nothing but boxers on and smoke weed and space out. I honestly feel bad for him. Hope he's doing better now though.
 

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bipolar
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I do this a lot growing up, because every time I look upset when I am upset, I get yelled at for it because my mom always thinks me looking upset is directed at her. So she sees me not looking happy as offensive and it's my way to attack her passive aggressively. So I will always force myself to put up a front of looking happy and cheerful even when I am sad. It sure was very bad for one's mental health doing this on the long run. Especially for a kid.

One of my aunts (a toxic one) was like that too to my cousin who's the same age as me. Every time he looked sad, she will physically slapped him. I still remember she slapped him one time when we were both sitting on the backseat when he frowned for some reason. Not sure how he's doing now, but he ended up having some mental issues and also major anger issues throughout high school and college. Quite a few times back then, their neighbors called the police on him because he often times will scream threatening to "kill" her. Last few times I saw him, which was like a few times in the past 10 years, he will sit in the backyard with nothing but boxers on and smoke weed and space out. I honestly feel bad for him. Hope he's doing better now though.
I remember the first and probably only time I tried to tell my father I was scared. I would have been in my teens and we were standing out in the back-yard near the fence. He just looked at me and said what on earth do you have to be scared of? He had left home at 16 and joined the British Navy then come to Australian when he met my Mum. So I guess he had a bit of trouble relating to this kid that grew up in a nice part of Sydney.

Didn't make me feel any better though - that's for sure.
 

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Loathed Loiterer
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I had a neutral affect for ages and still a bit now because when I was happy the person that was a dick to me my entire childhood would make sure to end that and force me to cry or something. So although I'm changing to be more expressive now I feel like I had the opposite thing, like when I was happy I couldn't show it because I expected people to want to break it.
 
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