Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been dealing with SAD for a very, very long time, though I was only officially diagnosed 2 years ago. I had to drop out of Nursing school when my SA kept me from doing a lot of the required workshops, or even answering questions in class! I went on medical leave, but have not been able to return because I am afraid nothing will have changed.

I have a 4 year old son, Caden, husband Matt, and a beloved little pug dog named George. We live in Canada, recently we have moved to Toronto (again, after a short break while I attempted to relax, back 'home'- didn't help much) though we are originally from the East coast.

I have been on Celexa, Wellbutrin, Trazadone, Ativan, and otehrs I have forgotten by now. Most recently I was on Celexa 80mg, but it wasn't working and I didn't have a proper doctor back east. I take Ativan nearly any time I leave my 'comfort zone' (my neighbourhood) or have to go anywhere alone.

Anyway, that's me and I am sure I will enjoy being around others who 'get it', since most in my life do not!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
:wels

People here definitely understand. I was in school to be a dietitian and quit because the communication aspect was too much. I'm going to just go ahead and get a college degree in general studies. It is much easier. Hopefully one day you can go back to nursing school.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
177,223 Posts
Hey Keirelle welcome. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
289 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
:wels
I was in school to be a dietitian and quit because the communication aspect was too much.
Yeah that was kind of my problem. It wasn't so much talking to patients, as it was the testing situations (acting out a situation with another classmate as your patient!) and the constant, unexpected questions so that the entire group would look at you and wait for an answer.

I had a really hard time trying to explain how my SA was to people. Like how I could talk to the same people outside of class and it was fine, but I couldn't answer a question in front of them. People just didn't get it at all, and once I qualified for disability status, people were mad at me for not having to do presentations, etc. I didn't last long anyway, the stress of it was too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
I had a really hard time trying to explain how my SA was to people. Like how I could talk to the same people outside of class and it was fine, but I couldn't answer a question in front of them. People just didn't get it at all, and once I qualified for disability status, people were mad at me for not having to do presentations, etc. I didn't last long anyway, the stress of it was too much.
I had disability services in college where I didn't have to do presentations but never used it. I went ahead and did all the presentations (at least 5 that I recall in the dietetics field). If I didn't, I figured people would be jealous of me and wonder why I got to get out of doing presentations. People would have asked me questions and I didn't feel like explaining. It seems like all of those young outgoing students wouldn't understand and I'd definitely be an outcast.

I was very rusty (but managed) talking to people and giving presentations. Some of my presentations weren't so successful. At least you can talk to people outside of class. That's something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154,233 Posts
Welcome, Keirelle! :)
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top