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Do you truely understand what a college degree prepares you for?

Given that all of us on here have SA and prefer to avoid social interaction, it seems odd that so many of us (myself included) would choose to go to college. IMO all college does is prepare you for a office job where you will: interact with co-workers, take phone calls from clients, meet face to face with clients, do presentations, etc.... pretty much everything most of us dread doing.

I went to college because I was taught to believe that it was "the thing to do in order to be successful." But now that I've gone through it and graduated, I'm left sitting here thinking it was all one big scam. 2 years later and I still sit here unemployed. Going to college is what created that unemployment gap on my resume that scares off most employers.

The last interview I went on (4th one in 2 years), the job was practically the worst job on earth, and they were offering a salary that was 50 cent higher than what I was making at my last job in highschool. I asked them about the future potentional, and guess what? ...there was none, unless you count a 35 cent raise after one year a bright future. WOW Im glad to see my degree is really getting me that great high paying job. /sarcasm I couldve kept that old job from high school and would be making way more than that by now.

I've also learned that liberal arts degree's are useless. I managed to learn nothing in 5 years of college. If I could do it over, I would have gone to a school and got into something that actually teaches you a real skill that can be used in the real world. That's what todays employers really want.

College degree's have become so common, that employers don't even seem to care anymore. The person who submitted for that job before you had a college degree, and the person who will submit after you will likely have one too.

I browse job ads everyday and the job description for every ad is so discouraging in so many ways. First off, there seems to be no such thing as "entry level" anymore. Today entry level means 2-5 years experience. Without those 2-5 years, your selection is pretty much narrowed down to sales, management trainee, or some other all commission job. ...Not exactly an SA'er's cup of tea.

Second, the wages continue to go down. I just read a new article today and it mentioned that salaries for college grads have dropped for the 4th year in a row.

Third, the number one skill everyone wants in communication skills, soon followed up with good phone skills. :(

I'm really quite bitter by the whole thing. I really wish I would've taken a different route. There are so many blue collar jobs out there that are in high demand that seem so much well suited for someone with SA.

It's odd because I read these boards and I can't help but see people that are going down the exact same road I went down. They are just blindly persuing that college degree without really having any clear direction about what they really want to. They hate social interaction just as much as me, yet they are going through something that will put them dead center in that situation. They are just doing it because once again, they were taught to believe that it's the thing to do.

Are most of you who are currently still in school, do you truely know the reality of what is waiting for you once you graduate?

Again I'm not trying to scare anyone or discourage people, because I'm sure there will be some on here that will be an exception to everything I said. But for others...
 

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Hm, well, I can't speak for you Americans because I don't live in the USA. But I do believe the employment situation in Croatia is no radically different than in the rest of the world. College degrees are becoming a necessity. If what you say is true, that college degrees are becoming common, then woe to the person without one, since employers will always prefer someone with a degree. In this age of high education, there are less and less jobs available to those who have never finished college. Remember - employers seek expertise.

Secondly, a college degree is indeed not a ticket to the world of high wages and instant employment. Every individual must choose their degree carefully. It involves an introspection of one's own interests and desires, but also a quick overview of the job world. There are degrees that are highly sought after and those that are not. I hate to say it, but degrees in arts aren't so fortunate when it comes to demand. Nowadays everyone is better off acquiring a degree in some practical field, like engineering, electronics, languages, medicine, economics, etc. Theoretical fields like sociology or theology are good because, if nothing else, at least they can land you a teaching job.

Like i said, I'm not sure if I got this right. Croatia has only about 7% of university-educated people, but our degrees are much harder to acquire and are worth a little more than American degrees. Still, my point stands - college degrees are essential in today's society, especially if you're serious about your career.
 

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If one avoids a certain type of situation, that situation does not make it go away. It only isolates the individual further. You may not then know how to handle yourself when you are forced into a situation.

The college degree is not entirely worthless. I am 45 yo and have never been to college. I work for a large international company. Without getting a degree of some type, I cannot advance in the company. The most that I can hope for is a 1-5% raise every year based on how well I perform and how well the people I work with don't. My current boss actually sat down with me and told me that I need to get a degree. I don't know yet whether I will do so or not.

Getting a job and supporting yourself is a fact of life. The option of not going to college may cause someone to end up doing a series of low paying jobs well past the age of retirement. It's just a lot easier to get away from jobs like salesman for Circuit City if you have that piece of paper. Working a blue collor job does not get you out of dealing with people. It just means living from paycheck to paycheck for most of your life.
 

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If what you say is true, that college degrees are becoming common, then woe to the person without one, since employers will always prefer someone with a degree. In this age of high education, there are less and less jobs available to those who have never finished college. Remember - employers seek expertise.
Exactly. People like me who don't have the money or brains for college are screwed today. Oh well, the world is always gonna need people to scrub toilets, haul away garbage, and scrape dead animals off the road. Hell, even those jobs are probably gonna require some kind of degree in the future! :roll
 

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Null said:
If what you say is true, that college degrees are becoming common, then woe to the person without one, since employers will always prefer someone with a degree. In this age of high education, there are less and less jobs available to those who have never finished college. Remember - employers seek expertise.
Exactly. People like me who don't have the money or brains for college are screwed today. Oh well, the world is always gonna need people to scrub toilets, haul away garbage, and scrape dead animals off the road. Hell, even those jobs are probably gonna require some kind of degree in the future! :roll
I think it is going even beyond that almost to the point where a graduate degree is needed to really make it. I believe that within a few years a simple bachelors degree is going to be worth as much as a high school diploma is today.
 

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it is the thing to do. It is how one proves one's worthiness and skills. It is the basis of middle-class America and a professional white-collar economy. I don't see why people get upset about that.
 

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I live the US, and most of the time, I have no idea what practical use a degree will have for me when I'm out in the "real world". Because, currently, I don't know what to major in. I started (still am) an English major-- but that's because high school guidance counselors "helped" me to pick what I'm passionate about. But, granted I don't "find myself" (wtf does that mean) in college as so many people say I will, and finish with an English diploma... what will that do for me? I can't do anything with it, especially in my area...
 

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What i wish i knew was the commerical weight of college, and the fact that they are a bussines. It's not an educational institution (by my standards). I think the teaching standard is dropping substantially since you have more and more people. You're basically there to invest odd $20,000 (or whatever), to get a piece of paper which says "You now have a possibility to work there and there". I also somehow missed the point that college was really about trashing yourself, dating, fun...etc...studying minimaly; maybe because of SA, but also because i held the values taught by my parents (who back in those days valued college highly).

I'm very disapointed at how the degree is easily devalued by employers to get you working at a minimal wage or jobs that even a computer is refusing to do. (But of course they have a bussiness to run). While the university itself is so overvaluing it. I feel very repulsed by the industry which now thinks they can get me all hyped up about getting ANY job (as long as i enter the machine), so they can use me for the next 20 years, and me feeling somehow thankful to them.

This is a good topic. I don't think college is neccessarily bad, but these young people are uninformed about the many possible interpretatons of what it really is. They just do what their parents think should be done.
 

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You guys are scaring the crap outta me. I'm currently a junior working on my BA in Political Science. I have no idea what I'm going to do with it, perhaps go on to get a masters but really I'm just kinda taking things one step at a time. I'm constantly asked what I can do with a degree in Political Science and all I can say is "I don't know, I'm just interested in the subject". A lot of people don't like that response but it's just the truth. I could lie and say I'm going to law school, but why? I'm not passionate about anything, I just want to live comfortably and not have to worry about job security my whole life. As of right now, it's either go to school or work full time at a gas station.

Besides, I do get paid roughly $800 in VA benefits a month for going to school, so it's basically like a job anyways. ;)
 

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I can take it

My life is so boring. My parents can afford college, so I do it. I'm used to being told what to do, and now that I'm an adult, I don't know how to act like one. I like college because it fills my time, I like everyone's youthful exuberance. I like being in a large city where things are happening all around me. I like not having my parents bug me. I don't necessarily count on college helping my career. I'm not thinking that far ahead.
 

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Wish I had known back then, but too late now. At least by next year I'll have an honours B.A. It may not seem like much now and I doubt it'll make much of a return on the tens of thousands I've sunk into it (not to mention didn't earn because I was at school full-time). But on the upside I've learned quite a bit in the past several years, about myself and the world around me, and I'm nicely set up to go for a graduate degree.

In retropsect, I should've gone into the trades. It's still an option for me after I graduate uni next semester. There's no rush. Only a handful of careers places a premium on age of entry. The rest are still game.

cheers :)
 

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Re: I can take it

sonya99 said:
My life is so boring. My parents can afford college, so I do it. I'm used to being told what to do, and now that I'm an adult, I don't know how to act like one. I like college because it fills my time,
Same here. Deep down I know I'm wasting my parents' money and it makes me feel massively guilty on a daily basis.

Pharmacy or anything in the medical field is the way to go nowadays. I change my major every year, but I pay close attention to what types of jobs are in high demand so I can can feel that what I'm doing isn't useless, and I change my major accordingly. The problem is always finding out I suck at/am too dumb for my major.
 

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Watching this thread, it seems that the people who are younger and in college seem to think that it is worthless and the people who are old enough to know the value of a degree seems do think it isn't. Does maturity have something to do with opinions on college? It may seem like a waste now but perhaps you don't really understand the benifit of it until later?

El Conquistador: That couldn't be a serious argument. College is the best place to learn those skills. Why do you think it is that English, math and often communications classes are required for graduates??
 

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I'm young and in college and I don't think it's worthless at all. Then again I'm working fulltime to be able to pay for it so might feel different if ya have yr parents paying.. but still how is learning ever worthless? It's all what ya make it to be :)
 

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El Conquistador said:
The three most important skills in life are writing, speaking and reasoning.

Very few classes teach any of them at all.
From my experience any Arts program course deals with all three of those skills. They don't address them directly, but do incorporate them into the lesson plan, demanding that the student write papers, present them to the class, and all throughout those two activities exercise their faculty of reasoning.

Whether or not the student learns anything from these endeavours relies almost entirely on the quality of the instructor. Good professors will challenge the student's reasoning, criticize (constructively) their writing and press them with difficult questions following their oral presentations. The bad ones ... well ... the bad ones do what's listed in their job requirements and little more.

I do believe, though, that a critical thinking class (argument assessment, logical fallacies, etc.) should be mandatory for all university students.
 

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Does maturity have something to do with opinions on college?
I would say the values have changed in 30 odd years. I think the older graduates value college from tradition, and it's hard to let go (maybe i'm bullsh*ting but i feel that's how it is) Also, i would say the younger people will progressively think less and less good about college in the future.
 

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I'm in university mostly because it's the only thing I'm good at. I'll be graduating this year and applying to get into optometry school starting next fall. If that works out then I think, for me, it's been worth it........
 
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