Social Anxiety Support Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Little Winged One
Joined
·
6,445 Posts
You're funny! Sure,we're out here,my life is very limited and confining and my world often feels about the size of a dime,but I exist.
 

·
Little Winged One
Joined
·
6,445 Posts
great, are you happy with that?what do you do to keep yourself 'entertained'?
No,I'm not happy and growing less so alllllll the time. At this point I only seek to find a contentment of sorts with life,I've given up on happy. I have some family,a sweet dog,various diversions. I often wonder if a feeling of happiness draining away and just existing is something most people (non SA) have to deal with. At a certain point most of the big moments of life are past and life becomes more blah and grey for most?? I'm not sure if that's the secret know one lets you in on or if that's a drastically distorted view because of SA and depression??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
389 Posts
Yes we are ALIVE!!! Live normally-well depends on your definition. Most people I think would think I have a normal life. I am married with kids, a house, 2 dogs, until this year a career. I have good friends who I talk to regularly. I go to parties and functions and can small talk a little with unfamiliar people.

However, I continue to struggle daily with SA-forcing myself to small talk with other parents, new people...whatever.

I had thought I had overcome most of this SA, until recently-when I lost my job-I realized it was profoundly because of SA that I lost my job!

This made me FINALLY go get help for SA. I just began seeing a therapist and am going to try some meds too. I overcame a lot on my own.......but I am hoping to rid it for good now.

You are young----go get REAL help NOW! Do try things on your own to help yourself.......but get a good therapist who understands SA. Don't think you can do it all on your own-yes I improved on my own, but guess what it never went away...I just tried to deal with it-somewhat successfully, but in the end not really.

I just kind of forced myself to do things that caused me anxiety. The problem was that yes I managed to do those things, but inside I had a ton of anxiety. This makes for a very tiring, exhausting, life- dealing with all that anxiety everyday. Things that should be fun are a lot of work. Go get help NOW, and have a full, fun filled, life. I am determined from now on, that I am enjoying life.
 

·
All Kinds of Awesome
Joined
·
1,418 Posts
Well, as strangely as i think your question was posed, there is an underlying truth to it as well.


What we often forget, is that mental health awareness, now, is not what it was even twenty years ago. It's really not where it needs to be IMO, but still it wasn't common for so many to 'come out of the closet' about their mental issues. So you will see people who came to the conclusion that there was a problem and possible explanation later in life. I have the great fortunate of getting a very early diagnosis in my teens. I was still a stubborn mule about 'doing' anything or progressing, but that's a part of maturity and it is not easy accepting the heavy burden of mental maintenance. I hope that makes sense to you... people do live 'normal' lives. It's just a matter of when they were diagnosed/realized in relation to their current age. There are, of course, so many factors that aide in recovery. It's never just a black and white issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I live a relatively happy life. Here and there, I go through a difficult time emotionally, like now. I'm 46, have a 14 year old severely autistic son, and am going through what I'm guessing is a mid-life crisis. Sooo, right this moment, I'd have to say I'm not joyful. At other times in my life, I can honestly say that I'm happy most of the time.

On a day to day basis, I do whatever I can to find some kind of fun. Even if it's just sitting down and watching a funny show or movie, that can be enough. I laugh every single day. I also have a trip to, dare I say, Disney World, planned with my husband for early December and know I will have a blast. Because of all there is to cope with having SA and a disabled child, my priority in life is FUN.

I agree with the others about treatment as soon as possible. When I was young, no one talked about (or knew about???) SA. I didn't get the treatment I needed. I didn't even finish middle school and was treated like some kind of criminal because of "skipping out" (like I was having fun doing it). They took me to Children's Court and ordered psychiatric help. He seemed perplexed by me and I ended up not getting the help I needed and was done with school by 14. I did end up getting my GED and finishing college, which is great.

You really don't need to go through what I did because every therapist out there knows what SA is now. Getting psychotherapy, maybe medication, learning better social skills...it's all very important to start doing right away.

So, we're out here. I'm mostly happy with my life, but realize a couple friends in the picture would do me a world of good. So, I'm actively going out and doing the things that will give me the opportunity to meet people. Scary, but very important for my mental health and my happiness.

Good luck to you.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,191 Posts
My mom! She overcame it sometime around her late teens/early 20s :yes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,149 Posts
I don't see myself turning 30. Not only does it scare the **** out of me but I don't see it happening.
I kind of feel the same way. I just can't imagine living through the cycle of suffering for four more years.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
434 Posts
I kind of feel the same way. I just can't imagine living through the cycle of suffering for four more years.
4 is a neat number though. Something's gotta give.
But yeah, I definitely don't see myself living it out that long either. It's like each day for me is a grind though the void rather than a gift.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks guys for taking to reply and share your experience and not to forget who gave advice. this question came to my mind few days ago after i had a bad dream during the night. I suddenly woke up around 4 or 5 and I felt like I was dead or something. feels like everything is so empty so quiet. nothing moves and it was so dark. then I started to think 'can I survive until 30 or 40 with this disability?am I gonna be alone until my last breath? I know we all had this struggle against this thing. So, I thought maybe I should prepare myself to accept what I've been shaped into.cheers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
I'm 46 and I'm still here but I'm pretty much over my SA now after traveling many different roads to find myself I'm not the same person I was, I'm in control now although I still do have the odd anxiety attack but I think thats only because I know how to have them (strange that)
life good for me now although I am a loner don't have any friends as such except 1 who I haven't seen for nearly two years (must visit)but I do have a loving partner for over 20 years(well probably loving for the last ten)and two children 4 and 8 months.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,697 Posts
My dad is 45 (I think) and hes living a pretty decent lifestyle with SAD.
He said that Valiums help him get by though.
 

·
ENTJ!
Joined
·
183 Posts
I'm just wondering if there is a people with social anxiety manage to live on 'normally' beyond 30 or 40.
*Raises hand!*

30's here!

And I even managed to reverse my personality as a result, from die-hard pessimist to an optimist! :boogie


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154,235 Posts
<- check age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,025 Posts
Depends on your definition of living. Am I breathing? Yes. Living? I really do not know. Sometimes I think about how I've allowed this SA to suck the life out of me, how even the thought of going out and trying to connect with people is so painful that I'd choose to deaden myself to it instead, how I am not really alive, just merely waiting for the axe to fall.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top