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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi I was wondering what are some high paying socially stress free or socially limited jobs. For instance from what I gather a computer programmer would be one type of job. My uncle is a computer programmer and it only recently occured to me he is an omnivert leaning more towards the introvert side. He also really likes computers. I live in Canada and am thinking about my future. I want to be in a career that suits my personality but at the same time gives me a decent wage. I have some serious problems with sleep. The problem is insomnia. I would really like a job that starts in the afternoon. For instance. There was a job I saw recently posted for a janitor for schools in the Toronto area. Now this job might not appeal to the majority of the population. It however struck a chord with me. The jos starts at $15.53/hr Canadian (not bad at all) and the shift starts at 3pm. This is the perfect time for me to start work. Why because if I stay up all night tossing and turnning I'll still have some time to sleep in. So here's what I'm getting at. The rules for replying to this post are as follows.

1. Name a high-paying socially stress free job.
2. Name the amount of time needed to invest in the education
to get this job. The shorter the better.

:popcorn
 

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Ok, not high paying, but I just found an interesting way to make a part-time salary working from home that's legitimate. If you're an expert in certain topics, about.com is looking for guides. Check out http://beaguide.about.com/topics.htm. You can make about $500 a month for 10-20 hours a week of work. But they only accept about 25% of applicants, so it is competitive. But perfect for people with SA! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Okay since I didn't get to many responses to my last title I will have to change the name of this thread. The thread will now be called "Good Paying, Socially Limited, Low Stress Jobs". This way I figure I'm not asking to much since my last title was a bit of a stretch. I also hope some fellow SAS members can list what they do for a living and if their line of work is suited to their socially anxious needs. I recently started a job in a call center. I really don't like the work as I kind of expected but I think I'm going to wait till after christmas to change. I'm thinking about becoming a security guard. Anyways I hope to get some responses and compile a reference list of the ultimate jobs/careers for people with Social Anxiety. I'll get things started and will put a little more detail beside each job/career as the list gets bigger.

1. Medical Transcriptionist
2. Security Guard
3. Janitor
4. Data Entry
5. Computer Programmer
6. Merchansdiser
7. Radiologist
:popcorn
 

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SandandLight said:
What about accounting. It's a four year degree, but I think one could still be an accounting clerk or bookkeeper with a two year degree.
Sadly, accounting is not completely a social free job. I know, I was one for 8 years. True, a lot of time is spent behind a computer, but you also have to interact with lots of people either over the phone or in person, such as customers, vendors, bankers, auditors, tax consultants, etc. Of course, if you know your job well enough, communicating with these people is not difficult at all.

But to make the really big money in accounting, you need social skills because you have to manage other accountants, and give presentations to upper management.
 

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Having a job with no social interaction is only going to send you further down the SA road to hell. The more secluded someone is, the worse it gets. I find that when I'm out working and forced to interact with people, that my SA improves a bit.

Also, everyone should consider that the job they work today will have a huge impact on their ability to find a better job in the future. That's something a lot of us SA'er don't really consider. Instead we take the most comfortable route. But that usually invovles being in job that doesn't provide you with the skills that a lot of employers want. A job with no social interaction looks really bad on a resume IMO.

My career goal, is to find middle ground between a job that isn't overly intense socially, and one that offers plenty of room for advancement and added financial security. That's not something I'm going to find by bouncing from one data entry job to another.
 

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:agree

There's many things about work that you don't enjoy, but you deal with them because you need a paycheck, and you need a good career to carry you through the rest of your life. Social interaction is just one of those things.
 

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Futures said:
Having a job with no social interaction is only going to send you further down the SA road to hell. The more secluded someone is, the worse it gets. I find that when I'm out working and forced to interact with people, that my SA improves a bit.

Also, everyone should consider that the job they work today will have a huge impact on their ability to find a better job in the future. That's something a lot of us SA'er don't really consider. Instead we take the most comfortable route. But that usually invovles being in job that doesn't provide you with the skills that a lot of employers want. A job with no social interaction looks really bad on a resume IMO.

My career goal, is to find middle ground between a job that isn't overly intense socially, and one that offers plenty of room for advancement and added financial security. That's not something I'm going to find by bouncing from one data entry job to another.
Well said, everyone should for the most social job they can handle instead of the least. That's exactly what I did earlier this year and I'm glad I did that.
 

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I have actually fantasized about being a truck driver. Being completely free and not having a conventional job...

but then I think about PARKING the dang thing, and being responsible for such a huge vehicle...
 

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I'm a medical transcriptionist. I love it, but it is very hard work and it's hard on your body. It is also quite stressful at times. It is great for a person who enjoys writing, has LOADS of self discipline, and is not depending solely on this income to live. Many MTs quit early on when they realize this is hard work and that it takes a lot of experience to make decent money. Most people aren't willing to work this hard for peanuts, lol. And it IS peanuts in the beginning! For those who are commited to learning everything they can, there is great potential money wise. It just takes a lot of blood, sweat, and tears to get to that point. If you ever hear those commercials on the radio that promise you will make big money doing transcription, DO NOT LISTEN!!! Those schools are scams and everyone in the business knows that people do not come out of school and make big bucks doing this. They just want your money.

MT'ing does require a good education. It costs a lot of money to get set up with all your equipment and stuff, but it is true, most MTs do not have to deal with many people. A lot of people get into the profession for the wrong reasons and then quit when they realize you can't do this with kids running around the house. You really need to treat this job as you would any other job outside of the house. In all honesty, it requires more concentration and focus than any other job I've ever had. It is not for everyone. But there are people like me who do enjoy the challenge and intense concentration required. It is a career where you never stop learning and every day is different than the last. And since you are paid on production, you truly get out of it what you put into it. There is no easy money in this. And if you need health insurance, forget about it, lol. I am self employed and luckily my husband provides our health insurance. I could not afford to do this if I needed to provide insurance. I would be practically working for free in that case.

But yes, it is a good option for some people with SA.
 

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Every since I was old enough to legally hold a job, I have been looking for the same thing. That perfect, SA friendly job. Now, at the age of 27, I have finally landed that job. I basically do data entry at an insurance company (it's more complicated than than but let's just leave it at that!).

This job is boring as hell!!!!! And I've only been here less than a few weeks! Even though I don't have to interact very much with people, I still have to deal with coworkers. I'd rather deal with the public than have to BS with the same set of coworkers day in and day out.
 

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radfaraf said:
Futures said:
Having a job with no social interaction is only going to send you further down the SA road to hell. The more secluded someone is, the worse it gets. I find that when I'm out working and forced to interact with people, that my SA improves a bit.

Also, everyone should consider that the job they work today will have a huge impact on their ability to find a better job in the future. That's something a lot of us SA'er don't really consider. Instead we take the most comfortable route. But that usually invovles being in job that doesn't provide you with the skills that a lot of employers want. A job with no social interaction looks really bad on a resume IMO.

My career goal, is to find middle ground between a job that isn't overly intense socially, and one that offers plenty of room for advancement and added financial security. That's not something I'm going to find by bouncing from one data entry job to another.
Well said, everyone should for the most social job they can handle instead of the least. That's exactly what I did earlier this year and I'm glad I did that.
Yes that's the route I'm trying to go down myself. Generally where I have problems socially is in the free-for-all, unstructured times. I'm applying to optometry because I think it would be very good for me, in that it would give me social interaction, yet still in a structured environment where I would hopefully know everything. It's something I think I could get very used to, yet it would help socially. For instance, I used to be terrified of standing in supermarket checkout counters and ordering pizza over the phone, etc. Now, after years of having to do that, such tasks are no big deal to me.
 

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Data entry is really boring (the repitition - not so bad if you can listen to the radio while doing it) and doesn't pay all that well, but it can help you get your foot in the door to a job in accounting. Some of the jobs for Accounts Receivable, Payables, and Payroll pay quite well once you get some solid experience behind you. However, as stated previously, you do have to deal with customers and vendors (but mainly on the phone- depends how well you deal w/that - a lot is now done by email as well and some people actually prefer dealing w/these issues via e-mail since it is much faster, to the point, & you have a record of the issues at hand).
 
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