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Anybody have advice on how to accomplish this goal? I am 4'11 and I weigh 84 lbs. so yes I am pretty damn light.lol. My goal would be to be around 106 lbs. so I have a ways to go.

I wanted some advice on what foods I should eat. I wish I could gain weigh fast but I have a very fast metabolism. :/.

Anybody try green shakes? What do you recommend I should out in said shake?
How about protein drinks? Protein bars? And what exercises are good to gain muscle..weight?

I'm up to try anything. But I'm ready to do it the healthy way.

Anybody who responds with tips..thank you for your help in advance. :)
 

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I cook my meals from scratch using whole(not processed foods), I have about 3-5 meals a day, along with 1-2 fruit/protein smoothies that I blend in a magic bullet, some snacks, and lots of water everyday. Every meal I make has some form of protein in it, plenty of veggies, and some sort of slow releasing carb like brown rice, or whole wheat pasta, or quinoa.

You have to learn to cook, there really isn't any other way. Your meals don't have to be complicated, or take long to make. Just google "quick healthy *name of protein that you want in your meal(chicken, beans, quinoa, turkey etc)* meal recipes*. Write down the list of ingredients, do this for several more recipes, and go grocery shopping.

In my smoothies I throw in 1 banana, some frozen mangos, some avocado oil, usually like 1/2 cup of it, a scoop of protein powder, 3 large scoops of raw oatmeal, a handful of walnuts, a little bit of pure maple syrup, maybe some almond butter, some fresh spinach on top and fill the rest up with pure orange juice(not that added sugar processed ****).

Eat every 2-3 hours so your body can pack in the most amount nutrition in a day.

I don't know where you at your level of fitness, but if you are starting from scratch, you can start with body weight exercises.

Pushups, squats, planks, crunches, pull-ups(using a pull-up bar, which you can find for $20 to shove in a doorway).

Start off with some 5 minutes of warm-ups like running on the spot if you want to get your heart going, then move onto the exercises I mentioned above. Work in small sets that you push out as fast as you can while still maintaining your form to start with along rests in between.

As you progress you can have larger sets with shorter rests in between sets. When are you done your exercises, make sure to do a bunch of stretches on every muscle group that you used during your workout. Get lots of sleep, and drink lots of water to promote healing and muscle growth.

Give yourself time to rest and recover between workout days, especially at the start. The first time you workout any muscle group its going to end up being really sore about 24 hours later for a few days.

Once you are no longer struggling or dying doing those body weight exercises, go get yourself some basic dumbbell hand weights, enough weight that you can lift between 6-10 reps at a time. Or you can go get a gym membership and start using the weight machines at that point.
 

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muscle

You don't mention your age. If your still a teenager then you'll grow and even if you aren't one, relax.
If you have had a sedentary lifestyle then I would recommend that you gently work yourself into an intensive exercise program. Start off doing body weight exercises e.g. lunches, squats, push ups, hand stands, planks etc etc. There is a truck load of info on the net. Do your research and find the right exercises, the important thing to do is compound exercises. These involve using your body (or major muscle groups) as opposed to isolation exercises such as a barbell curl that only works your bicep (1 muscle). Once you have gained some strength move onto chin ups (again there is a variety that you can do) hand stand push ups and other body weight exercises that require a lot of strength. You'll find these through research on the net and then trying them yourselves. Most people have to build up their strength in order to do hand stand push ups. For instance try these against the wall at home. You need to practice with the more advanced exercises.
If you want to join a gym, I recommend mostly compound exercises such as squats, dead lifts, cleans along with bench press (don't get obsessed with the weights you can lift as there is always a gym monster who can lift more than you, that's life) dips (eventually weighted dips) plus the abs/core. If the gym is not appealing consider a sport that suits your body type. Try gymnastics, it requires strength, stamina and power. I took up BJJ 5 years ago and I do body weight exercise such as hand stand push ups and pull ups with a 20 kg backpack. It took time to build up to this. At first I could only lift my body weight a few times so you've got to be patient.
Try a combination of sports such as swimming/wrestling/cycling/boxing/soccer. It helps to vary up your program by introducing new exercises and occasionally trying new things. Don't be unrealistic, unless your blessed with genes that give you bulging muscles don't expect to gain 20 kg in 1 or 2 years. If you improve your strength to body weight ratio that means more than being jealous of a 188 cm (6 foot 2) 100 kg (220lb) athlete with 7% body fat.
Nutrition is important, stay away from processed food. Don't get obsessed with protein intake.. if you get a balanced diet it will help you gain muscle. If you have a protein shake or bar it is best to have it after a tough work out. Don't piss your money away (literally) on huge amounts of protein shakes, bars etc. There is only so much your body can take.
Don't be afraid to compete in sport, it can be fun and you physically develop. I have social anxiety but sport has helped me with it. If people make disparaging remarks try another sport.
 

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Have you seen a doctor? I would double check and make sure you are not hyperthyroid, especially if you are doing everything you can to gain weight. It may be just your fast metabolism, I was the same way. I also became hyperthryoid later so I loss even more weight. Not fun! So do watch out and get physicals done regularly.

Okay, so these are things I've noticed which have helped me gain weight: Eating more protein, increasing my portion sizes, adding bacon to my breakfast, eating desserts here and there. Eat at buffets twice a week. Maybe cut back on exercise if you are moving around too much. Everyone's body is different, so what works for one may not work for you. But, I do hope you find what works for you. You may also want to see a nutrition who can help you come up with a meal plan.
 

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Some tips:

- Eat at least 300 cals over maintenance....use this site to find out your BMR: http://www.bmi-calculator.net/bmr-calculator/

- Add oil to your food or eat nuts to help yourself enough cals if you are struggling to get the amount of calories you need to gain

- High weight/low reps

- Eat eggs/egg whites - good quality protein in them

This site is good for finding exercises to do:
http://www.exrx.net/Lists/Directory.html

Here's an article that might give you some more insight on things:
http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/health-fitness/exercise/10-tips-to-build-muscle-fast
 

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This is called a clean bulk.

Anyway, you're just going to have to eat more. I recommend picking up some form of strength exercise routine. The easiest thing to do is a gallon of milk a day on top of what you normally eat.
Do not do that. Milk is only useful for pre-teens, for adults it is useless. Milk goes straight trough your body and actually leaves you with less calcium than you were with in the first place.

1..Increase your protein and fat consumption, but avoid saturated fats, also avoid artificial sweeteners, unless you want to build fat.

2..Incorporate resistance training, avoid cardio.

3..Sleep

4..Be consistent, since 20 kg you intend to add is 25% of your weight. Realistically you are looking at minimum 4 years of training and caloric surplus. Not taking unhealthy ways into consideration.

Good luck :)
 

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4..Be consistent, since 20 kg you intend to add is 25% of your weight. Realistically you are looking at minimum 4 years of training and caloric surplus. Not taking unhealthy ways into consideration.
It's in pounds, not kilograms... So it's almost half of that. I would say 2 years. But I definitely agree with milk not being as healthy as everyone thinks...
 

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I'm in the same position as you. Even from my past I had loads of junk food and hardly any weight gain.

Apparently I need to consume around 2500 cal. a day. And I struggle with that. Where do you find that many calories in one day :confused: (excluding dairy and wheat).

What are some healthy food sources for calorie intake?
 

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I'm in the same position as you. Even from my past I had loads of junk food and hardly any weight gain.

Apparently I need to consume around 2500 cal. a day. And I struggle with that. Where do you find that many calories in one day :confused: (excluding dairy and wheat).

What are some healthy food sources for calorie intake?
nuts, healthy oils like extra virgin olive oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, natural peanut butters, almond butters, oatmeal, brown rice, eggs, beans, chicken

Add smoothies to your diet everyday to pack in even motr calories and actually read my post above in this thread.
 

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Do not do that. Milk is only useful for pre-teens, for adults it is useless. Milk goes straight trough your body and actually leaves you with less calcium than you were with in the first place.
In studies done on sedentary nonathletes consuming greater than 1.5 mg/d. Whether or not this effect is mitigated by the larger intake of vitamin D or calcium isn't something I could readily find.

But I would think it absurd that in nonsedentary adults consuming an excess of calcium and vitamin D would result in lower bone density, especially if undergoing strength training which promotes increases in bone density.

1..Increase your protein and fat consumption, but avoid saturated fats, also avoid artificial sweeteners, unless you want to build fat.
Not all saturated fats are bad. Also, not all unsaturated fats are good. And they certainly don't cause you to get fat just by virtue that they're fats.
 

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Anybody have advice on how to accomplish this goal? I am 4'11 and I weigh 84 lbs. so yes I am pretty damn light.lol. My goal would be to be around 106 lbs. so I have a ways to go.

I wanted some advice on what foods I should eat. I wish I could gain weigh fast but I have a very fast metabolism. :/.

Anybody try green shakes? What do you recommend I should out in said shake?
How about protein drinks? Protein bars? And what exercises are good to gain muscle..weight?

I'm up to try anything. But I'm ready to do it the healthy way.

Anybody who responds with tips..thank you for your help in advance. :)
The real question is, What exactly are you eating to weigh 84lbs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The real question is, What exactly are you eating to weigh 84lbs?
Hahaha. Well with everything with my anxiety and depression..I lost weight. But I weighed 88 lbs. I eat a lot. I just have a very fast metabolism. I can eat a lot. But gaining weight is hard.
 

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Hahaha. Well with everything with my anxiety and depression..I lost weight. But I weighed 88 lbs. I eat a lot. I just have a very fast metabolism. I can eat a lot. But gaining weight is hard.
But what's is your diet like, I'm just curious? How much is a lot?
 

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Here's the age old example of Book Sense::blank

In studies done on sedentary nonathletes consuming greater than 1.5 mg/d. Whether or not this effect is mitigated by the larger intake of vitamin D or calcium isn't something I could readily find.

But I would think it absurd that in nonsedentary adults consuming an excess of calcium and vitamin D would result in lower bone density, especially if undergoing strength training which promotes increases in bone density.

Not all saturated fats are bad. Also, not all unsaturated fats are good. And they certainly don't cause you to get fat just by virtue that they're fats.
and Common Sense :blank

But what's is your diet like, I'm just curious? How much is a lot?
Interesting..

I'll stick to the person that asks questions first, before preaching the sermon.

:)
 

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Here's the age old example of Book Sense::blank

and Common Sense :blank

Interesting..

I'll stick to the person that asks questions first, before preaching the sermon.

:)
The whole "book smarts" thing is imo just a way to make people who don't know much to feel better about themselves.

All too often do I find people who like to apply their "common sense" to diet so that they can pretend like they know things and feel intelligent, when in fact they're ignorant and uneducated, potentially leading to harm.

I've handled eight billion or so questions similar to this one. Fast metabolizers do exist, sure; but it just means you're not eating enough.

"I eat plenty!" they object. And then we actually add up what they actually eat in a day and it's low in the calorie count. So they're not eating enough. I don't buy the the, "But I'm a super fast metabolizer!" because there is a name for that, we call it hyperthyroidism.
 

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The whole "book smarts" thing is imo just a way to make people who don't know much to feel better about themselves.

All too often do I find people who like to apply their "common sense" to diet so that they can pretend like they know things and feel intelligent, when in fact they're ignorant and uneducated, potentially leading to harm.

I've handled eight billion or so questions similar to this one. Fast metabolizers do exist, sure; but it just means you're not eating enough.

"I eat plenty!" they object. And then we actually add up what they actually eat in a day and it's low in the calorie count. So they're not eating enough. I don't buy the the, "But I'm a super fast metabolizer!" because there is a name for that, we call it hyperthyroidism.
I often list my daily amount of food in the what you ate today thread, feel free to visit it. After eating all that, only exercising 1.5 hours a day and basically being sendentary for the rest of the time while consuming that much food, ive only gainded 1-1.5lbs in the past 5 weeks. im 130 lbs at 5'10.5"(technically underweight according to BMI). I've ate tons everyday and quite similar since Decemeber so tell me how common it is for people to eat this much, other than exercising once a day, having an otherwise sendentary life are like this?

So I know you like to live in the delusion that peoples metabolism only varies by 300 calories a day, but that clearly is a load crock of ****. I dont have hyperthyroidism either and have beeen tested for that many times. But please by all means claim you know everything.
 
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