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Truthfully, I don't think your counselor will think any less of you if you admit to having SA. This is their profession and they've had meetings with people struggling with a variety of issues. Admitting to it can help you get some of the answers your looking for about SA. Your counselor can help with with exposure excersies and take some steps to overcome SA. If you don't want to come out directly and admit to your SA you can list some of the symptoms you've been experiencing and they can make the conclusions themselves which may save you some embarassment. I wish you all the luck!
 

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I've seen numerous therapists and counselors. All of them have been great, compassionate, understanding people. They're there to listen to you. They won't think any less of you if you admit you have SA.
 

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Of all people in the world, I would think psychological professionals would be the least likely to judge you for having social anxiety - it's their job to deal with these things after all, and they are professionals. Then again it's also their job, theoretically, to diagnose you, so you really shouldn't have to be outright telling them you have it, they should be able to infer that through questioning.

My problem with it would be more along the lines of sounding self-important and presumptuous... like it's the psychologist's job to diagnose me, but I've already gone and diagnosed myself and I'll tell them exactly what's wrong with me instead of the other way around. Now I'm pretty sure that I'm right, but I'm also pretty sure they're going to be thinking that I shouldn't be doing that and that I should wait for their professional opinion and all.
 

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They have heard every bad circumstance under the sun. So I don't think admitting to having SA is anything to worry about.
 

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I could admit to being depressive, bipolar, psychotic... anything but SA. Is anyone else as terrified of admitting it to others? Not necessarily a therapist, but anyone in general: friends, family, whomever.
I am, though I wouldn't feel comfortable about admitting if I had bipolar or any other mental health issue. I had enough trouble admitting I had depression as it is. :um But yeah, I feel embarrassed about my SA and haven't even told my family. They think I've had bad anxiety in the past but I don't think they know SA exists (if they did, they surely would've worked it out by now. Especially if they took how I act in social situations into account). I don't know why I find it embarrassing. Because I haven't even been able to admit it to anyone outside my family. I tried but ended up calling it 'anxiety' instead and leaving out the 'social' part. I worry about getting treated differently if people were to find out.
 

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I'm about to go through therapy too, and there's absolutely no reason to feel embarrassed. You have to see it as something you were given, you didn't choose it, it chose you, it's the deck you were handed. It took me the best part of 2 weeks to tell my own mum, but once I did, I thought to myself "what was I worried about?"

This counselor has a job to do, and it's not to judge anybody. They're not gonna go home thinking about you, at least not in a negative way. And even if they did you wouldn't know. It's all in your head. Trust me, you'll feel a hell of a lot better when you get it out in the open, because you're taking a step, and because a problem shared truly is a problem halved. Social Anxiety is a disorder, it's something that exists in the world, and you're not the only one who has it. It's just something that needs to be fixed. You wouldn't be embarrassed to go to a doctor and say you broke your leg and need help with it, so why feel embarrassed about this?
 
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