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As I get older and older, it seems I have less and less of an interest in making as much money as I can; which is how most people are nowadays. They can never get enough. Do you think you'd be that much happier with a lot of money than with not so much? In another thread which asked about whether you would rather choose to have SA and be a millionaire or neither of the two, I picked the choice of having SA and being a millionaire. But then sometimes when I really think about it with a clear head, I tend to completely change my mind and choose the opposite. I come from a fairly wealthy family and from this experience of having money, I found that the luxury things that I bought or were given to me, which were things I wanted but didn't need, got old faster than I would have expected. I'm not going to go into too much detail, but for instance when I started driving I was bought a very nice car. The anticipation weeks in advance prior to the day of actually getting it was exciting. That day I got it was also very exciting as well as the next couple of weeks. But then, to my surprise, it just got dull and boring. I realized it was just a car. The same thing happened to me every other time I got something new. Now, I'm not saying money doesn't matter to me to the extent of not being able to buy the necessities in order to survive decently (e.g. food, clothes, place to live, etc.), but anything more than that just doesn't interest me all that much anymore because I know now that most of these luxuries you can buy from having a lot of money are all superficial and only bring very minimal, temporary happiness. I suppose I know the reality of the situation better than most other people my age, because everyone else seems crazily possessed by getting the best job with the highest paying salary. The only thing I can't speak badly about when having a lot of money are vacations. Not all people enjoy traveling but for the ones who do (like myself), it is a great freedom to have. Though, that's about it.

The problem with this philosophy I have established is that it is affecting my school work and my motivation to do good. Money is the leading driver in all of this..go to college, get good grades, graduate with high gpa, get high paying job, make a lot of money. I can also see how people want to establish a stable means of income for their future family but this also does not motivate me because I have a strong belief that I will not have a family/wife/kids to begin with. So what's the point? What's the purpose of working my a** off when I mostly know what the end result will turn out to be anyway? I'm becoming to think a simple mediocre, average paying job would suit me well enough. Does anyone else think similarly? Are you the money-hungry type?
 

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Seriously , never serious
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To a point I like knowing I can have what I want when I want it within reason but there is not that much I want that I can have without more money than I'll ever have .
So I just invest most of it and see what happens . But it's not that important to me we'll not as much as it used to be .
 

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I think it's very idealistic to say that money isn't a motivator. If you wish to maintain any amount of freedom within society, money is a necessity. Money motivates me in so much that it provides me with the means to live comfortably. That is, it gives me access to housing, clothing, education/information, transportation and food.

Capitalism breeds the ideology that wealth is something that can be quantified in bank notes and possessions, so it's no surprise that people are largely of this opinion (consciously or not). Quite simply; society as it is today wouldn't be sustainable if we thought any differently.
 

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Bert, I feel for you. I was raised religious, so I never cared about money until I lost my faith and realized that money was what drove everything in this world. It really depends on what level of poverty you're talking about, though. If you're poor and you aren't sure you can afford your next meal, then money is pretty important. If you're middle class and you're not sure you can afford a nicer car, or a new kitchen makeover, then money is less important. If you're upper class and you're not sure you're the richest man in the world yet, then money really isn't that big a deal. It's relative. Please look up "Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs". The higher up the list you go, the more motivation you will require to work hard enough to earn it, but the very basics are necessary for all of us.

In regards to your experience as a wealthier citizen, don't get too caught up in that. Please see "The Hedonic Treadmill". What you will find is that research thoroughly supports your experience is universal across all spectrums of wealth. It all has to do with expectations, and conditioning. For you, a nicer car may only excite you for a little while, because you expected it. For a poor person, that nicer car may have excited them more, for longer, because they didn't expect it, but everyone would eventually lose that enthusiasm to some degree. It's only natural. For wealthier people, they have to reach a little higher to achieve things they weren't expecting, like becoming President. No matter how high up the ladder you are, there is always a rung above you in life. There is no ceiling, but ultimately, it's all relative, because you could reduce the infinitely tall ladder to three simple rungs. The one below, the one you're on, and the one above. No matter where you are compared to everyone else, you are still in that exact same situation.

Now, hearing about things like the Hedonic treadmill may depress you, and further enforce your belief that life is boring, and it's not worth it to try so hard. You might be right, but here is my theory. We only think this way because we have been trained by society to expect so much from life. Our culture is saturated in this ideology that human beings are "special", the universe "cares about us", and we are all going to be happy. That's a load of garbage. We are animals, not special. The universe doesn't view us any differently than any other creature. Happiness comes from passion and work, it is not handed to you. When you begin to learn how to live like an intelligent animal, instead of one of god's special snowflakes, you'll realize that life has plenty to offer, but even if it didn't, your entire existence is about finding ways to enjoy yourself while you can. We fear death because we delude ourselves into thinking we shouldn't have to die. Death is necessary for the universe to move forward. Be thankful that mechanism is in place, or we'd all just stagnate here, on an overpopulated planet devoid of resources and entertainment. When you play a video game, or a sport, or watch a movie, you KNOW it's going to end. You don't walk into it with the expectation that it should last forever, so you're able to enjoy it. Look at your own life the same way. Be the intelligent animal. Chase what you want, express yourself however you like, and have the courage to live. Don't just look for a comfortable way to die, which is what it sounds like you are doing.
 

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Retired Bingo Cook
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I wish there was a better way. But it seems that money is here to stay.
 

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For some reason, even when I was a kid, money has always motivated me. I don't want to spend it, though. I earn it just to save it. I feel more secure and happy the more money I have in the bank.

I think I could be happy without a lot of money, as long as I had enough for basic survival. Having a mediocre job wouldn't make me unhappy. It's SA that makes me unhappy.

People can get through a lot if they have other people to support them. I don't have that support network, so having money makes me feel safer. If I had friends, I don't think money would be as important.
 

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Studies have shown that when you get past the poverty line, money stops being as powerful a motivator as intrinsic motivation in an activity is.

I think there will be a lot of individual variation though with some people clearly being more motivated than other's. Personally it doesn't motivate me really. It's a means to an end, and when I have enough I really don't need more.
 

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Father, Son & Holyzilla
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Money motivates me a little. I want a good paying job, well enough to own a home and live within my means. But I am not so motivated by money that I'd do anything for it.
 

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Money motivates me a little. I want a good paying job, well enough to own a home and live within my means. But I am not so motivated by money that I'd do anything for it.
This basically.. It would be nice to have money to afford the opportunity to travel and get around a little more.
 

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No... money is normally a huge de-motivator or a source of constant frustration.

Bert Reynolds said:
As I get older and older, it seems I have less and less of an interest in making as much money as I can
Dreaming of industrious success is probably different than earning money with me.

As I get older, industrious success becomes less and less of a motivator as life has proven to me time and time again that money and earning that money are entirely unrelated. My work ethic has been devastated.

Bert Reynolds said:
anything more than that just doesn't interest me all that much anymore because I know now that most of these luxuries you can buy from having a lot of money are all superficial and only bring very minimal, temporary happiness.
I am extremely frugal as well.

Do you feel somewhere along the line, you may have confused success with entitlement to the finer things in life, such as love and marriage?

Bert Reynolds said:
I'm becoming to think a simple mediocre, average paying job would suit me well enough. Does anyone else think similarly? Are you the money-hungry type?
Hmmmmnnn... I'd be lying if I said money was never a motivator.

As for mediocre jobs. The last year or so I've been thinking about embarking on a perpetual hobo style journey. Rather than my planned decisions in life dictating my fate, I figure, why not throw everything into the wind and let random chance and serendipity decide a while.

If my health improves, I may do that, since my concerns about how much time I have left with the possibility of good health is becoming a larger issue.

That being said, a big money project has been offered to me recently. However, it's nearly the same road I went down 7 or so years ago, so I am truly reluctant to set myself up for another potential disaster. What good is money if you do the math and discover you're in fact working for less than 3rd world wages? So... money never motivated me with my work ethic, but the fact that money never follows through, or the crap one must wade through to get the money after a project is done, is always the death blow.

I've been stolen from, robbed, mugged, cheated and swindled so many times, I can't count them all.
 

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I only need enough to sustain my basic existence plus a little bit more to put away in savings. After this point, other things become more important to me. That is why I have cut down to working part time - after my needs have been met, money does not motivate me enough to spend even more of my life at the office.

Of course many, if not most, people are extremely motivated by money, which is what our capitalist society relies on to keep afloat. It's the carrot on a stick that keeps people giving up their spare time to put in endless hours at places they'd rather not be.

We have an annual bonus system at work and when details of the new one are released each year everyone falls over themselves to find out what it is and what they need to do to get the maximum payout, and (when the end of the year is nearly up) exactly when the pay will arrive and what it is estimated to be given the KPIs that have or haven't been met. I have no idea how it works and don't care :stu Whatever I get, I get.
 

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"The summer between his sophomore and junior years Chris again returned to Annandale and took a job delivering pizzas for Domino's. "He didn't care that it wasn't a cool thing to do," says Carine. "He made a pile of money. I remember he'd come home every night and do his accounting at the kitchen table. It didn't matter how tired he was; he'd figure out how many miles he drove, how much Domino's paid him for gas, how much gas actually cost, his net profits for the evening, how it compared to the same evening the week before. He kept track of everything and showed me how to do it, how to make a business work. He didn't seem interested in the money so much as the fact that he was good at making it. It was like a game, and the money was a way of keeping score."

This is a quote from the book, Into The Wild. This is pretty much how i feel about money. I find a large amount of joy in being good at something, and money is a way to show that i am good at something, especially when it's money I made through hard work, or an idea.

When I got my first raise at my job, I was happy that i was getting more money, but I was even happier that i was being appreciated for the job that i was doing, which was why i got the raise in the first place.

So yes I would say money motivates me, as it does most people because the one thing that motivates everyone is their personal happiness. People will always strive to be happy and content, and today money is large determining factor of happiness.
 
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