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I've always been very reluctant to tell anyone about my social anxiety/phobia, and particularly when it comes to work situations. I've had to leave two jobs because of SA, either because my behaviour (being virtually catatonic!) meant I was and 'outcast' with the rest of the staff, or the job environment was too much to cope with.
I've never admitted it in the interview process nor later in any job. That is up until now!
I've been at my current job for 3 years, and the environment has been particularly difficult to cope with, (I think I had a mini breakdown at one point) but I have battled on. However, it's made relationships with colleagues very difficult, and I basically go to work in order to get out of there when I can! I've alienated the majority of the people there because of SA, but the ones I've befrended (only over the last 7 months!), are curious about me and are constantly trying to 'suss me out'.
I've had to admit to my boss that I have an anxiety problem (although I didn't go into much detail, because he's not really that interested!), because they were going to send me on a one week course (with many people there!). I've told 2 other colleagues, neither really understand to what length it affects me. The job is in a predominantly male environment (me=female!), and on a daily basis most people are taking the mick out of each other (sometimes in not very pleasant ways). I know if I admitted to most of my colleagues, I'd never hear the end of it, and I suspect most if not all would react like this "get a grip"!
Do you think it's best to let it all out and tell people that you work with what's going on? Because then they might at least have an some insight into why 'we' behave the way we do.
Have you done so, and what was the outcome?:)
 

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I can't really speak for all situations, but in general I don't think it is a good idea. You want your boss and coworkers to see you in a positive way, and giving telling them you have SA probably works against that. Most people won't understand SA. Telling a select few might be helpful, such as you have done, although personally I haven't told anyone at work, even those I've gotten to know well.
 

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I have never come out and said "I have social anxiety." I've hinted at it a few times, but generally I pretend that people don't make me anxious when I'm at work. I think some people do know--yesterday, one girl told me that I seem much more calm around people these days. All I could say was, "Well I am glad I seem like that."
 

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Never done it, don't intend to, would recommend against doing so.

I might consider it if it was someone who I knew to also suffer from depression, SA, or something similar.
 

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No. They have no business knowing.
 

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I'm in the lucky position to work in a department with a very good working atmosphere.
Everybody is very sympathetic, civilized and with a lot of common sense and most of all with a great sense of humor! The age structure is very diverse from mid-twenties to early sixties.
I've been with the company for over 7 years now.

It's quite useless denying or trying to conceil the obvious and pretending being someone you are not. I never had problems admitting that I'm not very social. And I didn't want them getting the wrong impression when I wouldn't take part in social gatherings and such.

I never say: "I have SA!" but I say that I have problems or am overwhelmed with this or that situation.

Surprisingly in 80 per cent of the times they would reply that they feel the same but brush it away or do it anyway out of sense of duty or they end up having fun anyway. But they accept my decision and by doing so encourage me to join in more and more.

You have to sense whether the people are educated and tolerant enough to actually comprehend and accept what your problems are otherwise you might regret it!
 

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No I keep it to myself. The environment I work in already has a bad enough atmosphere without me telling anyone. You are also laying yourself wide open to be treated badly by other people who may take advantage of your "weakness".
 

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If I was working (which I'm not right now unfortunately) I'd probably consider telling a colleague, if I was also friends with them outside work and knew them well enough to know I could trust them not to go repeating the information to anyone else/felt it was likely they'd appreciate where I was coming from. But other than that I probably wouldn't make a point of bringing it up with anyone.
 

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No I won't tell anyone at work. They all know I'm quiet, and I think thats all they need to know. They just think I'm the sweet shy girl, and thats fine with me! hehe.
 

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It's foolhardy to just tell people about it - you might get a negative or even exploitationary (is there even such a word?) response - people might take advantage of you for being too honest.

I'd rather imply in my words and actions that I dislike any attempt to gain information on my personal and social affairs, and that not respecting my privacy means everyone suffers from reduced productivity - sounds big but it's not - I lay low and tolerate being a pet for the first month or so before revealing the wolf under the sheepskin.

By then the rest just have to adapt to me who controls a significant part of daily operations, directly or indirectly.

My suggestion is to not announce anything but treat everyone like a client - transactional services are rendered under the guise of cooperation but under expectation of professional conduct on both ends. You don't incur liability from invading into their respective spheres of influence - on the contrary, you observe their every move and can decide on who you wish to confide in (and enforce penalties if they decide to breach your trust).
 

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I had to go on disability because of my anxiety, and my boss didn't beleive me, he thought I was faking and lying about it.
Needless to say I am not longer there, not like I expected to go back he didn't help any in my anxiety so it's a blessing that I am not there.

I am going to an interview tomorrow for a potential job, if i get it, I don't know how i will manage, I will need to find a way to sneak on the internet to come on here and vent.


to answer the OP, If its going to effect your performance and your job like it did mine, then they do have a right to know, they will notice whether you tell them or not.
 

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I would advise against it.

Although I work with someone who read me really well...because she has struggled with many of the same things I do. She brought the subject up and we discussed it. She has been a mentor. As far as I know it has not gone any further.
 

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I would advise against it.

Although I work with someone who read me really well...because she has struggled with many of the same things I do. She brought the subject up and we discussed it. She has been a mentor. As far as I know it has not gone any further.
It would not go further; I'd guarantee it. That's awesome. In reality, you both know that this is just a small portion of you.
 

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Well, I can't admit what's not diagnosed now can i ? :)

That being said, no matter how tolerant society claims to be, there is still a general phobia to even a harmless problem like S.A. Telling people you have S.A. elicits almost the same impression as of a schizophreniac..mostly. The people who actually sympathise with S.A. are to far and in between for me to trust writing it on an application or ever mentioning it at work.

I just trust that internet swooping doesn't bring potential employees to my account on this site - but i'm no criminal, and there's no bigotry in my comments.. so if that happens; let them think of SAS.com what they want.
 

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I can't really speak for all situations, but in general I don't think it is a good idea. You want your boss and coworkers to see you in a positive way, and giving telling them you have SA probably works against that. Most people won't understand SA. Telling a select few might be helpful, such as you have done, although personally I haven't told anyone at work, even those I've gotten to know well.
I agree.

That's giving your employer way too much information. And it could come back to haunt you, since they might use that as an excuse to fire you. Paying someone else $5,000 less might be very tempting to them. And many unemployed folks are willing to work for a lot less.

I know employees who have been fired for little, little, little, things-- unrelated to their job performance.
 

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That being said, no matter how tolerant society claims to be, there is still a general phobia to even a harmless problem like S.A. Telling people you have S.A. elicits almost the same impression as of a schizophreniac..mostly. .
There's still a stigma associated with a mental disorder. And a lot of people are living in the '70s, and they cannot grasp this disorder or anything that appears strange to them.

"You better get your *^^%&*(%% together." Yeah, thanks. Thanks for the valuable advice.
 
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