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Hot Garbage Stew
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I haven't gotten rid of my SA completely, but I'm a lot better. I would say I've accomplished avoiding depression for 8 months now. For me it's meditating, exercising (haven't been doing much of that lately) and studying Buddhist philosophy that helps. I'd say the first two methods are recommended for anyone because meditation doesn't have to be about what you believe and to meditate and exercise you need nothing but your own body. I didn't find medication or talking about it to be very helpful, but that's just me. Other than that, I suppose writing a journal could also help. And get out there as much as possible.
 

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^ Nice post.

You can't do it entirely alone, because it's a social problem. You need appropriate doses of interaction.

I have quit drinking and smoking, started exercising every day and avoiding unhealthy processed food as much as possible. This has all helped a lot but there is a long way to go. I have been meaning to meditate more but I also procrastinate a lot and need to work on that too. Getting started is always the hardest part for me. Saying goodbye also takes some getting used to.
 

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I am not so sure I am cured of it, but I have overcome many things in the last year or two. This whole summer, I have managed to avoid any real ruts/ bouts of anxiety or sadness, though I really want the summer to end and get on with school. I was forced to take a job in a retail position where I would have to actively help people and help them with many things I did not know much about, and think that was a major turning point. I still become quite anxious at times, but I have managed to cope with it. The funny thing in a job like this is at times you cannot help the person or suggest the best procedure (you don't know the exact details of what they're dealing with and neither do they), but you may find that they still turn to you for help at times.

Another thing that helped was reading. I think I had always had bigger questions and concerns in my head than I knew how to express, and reading more challenging fiction and philosophy helped me to form my thought structure into a more critical one (as in becoming critical and aware of my own self and others for the better.) I learned at my own pace by scouring the Internet for different writers, and could enjoy/ gain from the works by my own interest. At the present time I am having trouble to really explain the full benefits I felt this had.

I have opened up to my sisters and brother, and a couple of friends, in regards to my anxiety several times over the past year. One friend I would often share my experiences with, and how I felt, but usually in a humorous manner. I have never really expressed how I have felt at the deepest depths of depression or anxiety to these people, but I have shared some of my own experiences and feelings with them, and found common ground.

Somehow, out of all of this, I have learned to not care what others think of me for minor and indirect things. Not every casual interaction means much or will be remembered; not every small error I make will mean much or will be remembered; it is not likely that any stranger that might ridicule me will ever mean anything to me; I don't have to like the things that other people do, and if that is an issue then so be it; and on and on. I have always been a strange apple, and the more and more I have come to realize this and the fact that it should make no difference to others , the more I can cope.

Still, I have a ways to go in really conquering my anxieties, but if I have to eliminate all of my anxieties to consider myself cured then I will only end up worse. I just, at the very least, hope to overcome the anxieties that halt me in my progress. I have no definite path or goal at this time, and this is something I have always lacked to my own detriment, but I feel that somewhere inside there is a flint ready to spark. Over the years I have yet to really get a handle, but the more I can win minor battles, the more I feel I could establish a life for myself.
 

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Well its not completely gone but in the past 7 weeks i have gone through massive changes.

I started off by identifying the causes of anxiety and then working with that.It can be very slow at first with many ups and downs but once you start understanding certain patterns of feelings and thoughts plus the reasons you fear people you learn to overcome them.My personal realization is you see that anxiety is a symptom, not the true problem.

I moved to a city by myself knowing nobody.Now i have met some great people, i hand out resumes without a problem, i am starting to learn personal responsibility,gaining confidence and the importance of honesty with myself and others.I now have a girlfriend who knows about my anxiety and wants to help me change and being with her is forcing me to face my myself even more so.

So yes it is possible.I think you must first deeply desire change, when you do life throws you the tools to do it.No matter how confused you are or where to start you will find your method to help you along the way.Its been rocky with many slip ups but so worth it.
 

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I've found that I've grown out of my SA somewhat just by getting older and becoming more mature. However, I have also tried meds and therapy along the way. ssri's didn't help me much, and in the past therapy was not that helpful either. now I am seeing a therapist with some specific goals that I want to work on, and hoping that will be more helpful than some things I've done in the past.

Idk if it's possible to get "cured" of sa. I've heard other people say that they didn't used to have sa, and it's something that developed over time. However, this has never been my experience. I have been shy for as long as I can remember, and although there have been events in my life that have increased my anxiety, a large component of it is genetic, and I don't believe it will ever go away completely.

I think it is possible to over come some of the negative results of sa. but you have to be very disciplined, and will yourself to go through with things that your mind and body are telling you to run away from as quickly as possible. I understand why you might now want to take meds, but what exactly is your aversion to therapy? I wouldn't say that therapy is a cure, or even immensely helpful, but it's probably better than nothing. Unless it's a money issue, I see no reason not to at least try it out.
 

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hello

I definately haven't cured it, but ive gotten much better. I used steady cardio excercise , fish oil supplements. I use the website anxieties.com for free advice on social anxiety disorder. Huge improvements. I don't have panic attacks at all anymore, I still get a little nervous, but i am able to do way more than i use to. You can make remarkable progress on your own.
 
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