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My daughter has all the signs of SAD. She's 14. She doesn't like feeling like this and it breaks my heart to see her like this. She has asked to see a therapist. So I started researching about therapy for it. Seems like Cognitive Beharior Therapy may be the best way to go with her. I have one therapist and she lists CBT on her bio. Another therapist doesn't list CBT. Is there additional training licensing for CBT or should most all therapist know about CBT? My husband sees the therapist that doesn't list CBT. We were going to go have our daughter see the same therapist ( at different times) as my husband he has similar issues and thought it might be helpful to the therapist if she saw both of them. Thoughts? Should I stick with one that specifically says CBT. She wants to start therapy ASAP so I don't want to waste precious time with the "wrong therapist"
 

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My psychologist is trained in CBT-but only uses it somewhat. I think what is more important is that the therapist has true understanding and experience with SA. Is your husband getting help in his therapy? Your daughter has to feel at least somewhat comfortable with the therapist. Maybe ask your daughter is she would be comfortable going to the same therapist or if she wants a different one. Best wishes!
 

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Querdenker
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Perhaps you should ask the therapist whether she can do CBT. Possibly she does, but did not list it. The fact that your husband sees her suggests that she has some knowledge in this area, so possibly she can, since it falls within the same general area.
 

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It is great that you are recognizing your daughter's issues, and acknowledging that treatment is important to her health! It's also great to see that she is comfortable enough with you to tell you that she needs therapy! It seems like your familial unit is very strong and supportive, which is just what she and your husband need!

I'd suggest talking to your husband about how his therapy sessions go, which I assume since you are considering using the same therapist he uses, is positive and beneficial. Also call the office and explain your concerns and that you are interested in implementing CBT, and see what she offers, if not she may be able to refer you to a good therapist that utilizes it.
 

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My daughter has all the signs of SAD. She's 14. She doesn't like feeling like this and it breaks my heart to see her like this. She has asked to see a therapist. So I started researching about therapy for it. Seems like Cognitive Beharior Therapy may be the best way to go with her. I have one therapist and she lists CBT on her bio. Another therapist doesn't list CBT. Is there additional training licensing for CBT or should most all therapist know about CBT? My husband sees the therapist that doesn't list CBT. We were going to go have our daughter see the same therapist ( at different times) as my husband he has similar issues and thought it might be helpful to the therapist if she saw both of them. Thoughts? Should I stick with one that specifically says CBT. She wants to start therapy ASAP so I don't want to waste precious time with the "wrong therapist"
They don't really have to specialize in CBT, just SA. The rest can come from a book or tapes or online. Basically, you do something and then talk about it.
 

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A case study on a seventh grade Native American student. The author describes a 'day-in-the-life' of following a student around during her school day, and some recommendations made over the semester's observations of her overall.
 

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This is my first time posting here, so I hope I'm doing it right. I totally disagree that SA is the parents fault. My daughter was diagnosed with selective mutism at a very young age (4) which is an early form of SA. I noticed that she wouldn't speak to people or make eye contact, but she was always verbal and even animated at home with her immediate family members. I also have an older son who does not have anxiety. My husbands father had severe anxiety and panic attacks, so I have no doubt it's genetic. Anyway, I took her to a therapist at an early age and once she was in school, I educated her all her teachers about selective mutism, and the importance of not making her speak out loud. I learned alot from the therapist too, about not pressuring her to speak in public. Eventually she started speaking in public, playing sports, and making friends. Although the SA never went away, she has been doing pretty well. I am noticing that as she gets older (she is 16), she is having difficulty coping with comittments. She tends to back out of things at the last minute, and is having alot of anxiety about a strict soccer coach. I am concerned because we are looking at colleges, but with her difficulty in following through on things, I don't want to set her up for failure. My question is this .. my husband sees her lack of following through on comittments as laziness, but I think it has more to do with the anxiety. Is this something that is typical of SA? I try encouraging her without being pushy. I don't want to send the message that it is ok for her to make a committment, and then not follow through, but I also am very sensitive to her anxiety because of what she went through as a small child. Sorry for the long post, but any insight is helpful because she isn't always able to recognize or verbalize these feelings.
 

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Shoe Czar
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If your husband likes his therapist, I'd suggest going that route. If your daughter doesn't feel like she's garnering anything from the sessions you can always switch later on. The important thing is that you are trying, so try no to stress too much about which one's right. You've already made the decision to get her help and that's what matters most.
 

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My daughter has all the signs of SAD. She's 14. She doesn't like feeling like this and it breaks my heart to see her like this. She has asked to see a therapist. So I started researching about therapy for it. Seems like Cognitive Beharior Therapy may be the best way to go with her. I have one therapist and she lists CBT on her bio. Another therapist doesn't list CBT. Is there additional training licensing for CBT or should most all therapist know about CBT? My husband sees the therapist that doesn't list CBT. We were going to go have our daughter see the same therapist ( at different times) as my husband he has similar issues and thought it might be helpful to the therapist if she saw both of them. Thoughts? Should I stick with one that specifically says CBT. She wants to start therapy ASAP so I don't want to waste precious time with the "wrong therapist"
you might want to ask yourself if you are doing something that is creating this problem that your unaware of... the problem may also originate from other people. the problem always originates from PEOPLE and not your daughter. unless you find the source and abolish the fear your daughter will continue exhibiting social anxiety. something may be happening to her or she may be witnessing something.
 

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NOTHING MATTERS
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Completely Agree

you might want to ask yourself if you are doing something that is creating this problem that your unaware of... the problem may also originate from other people. the problem always originates from PEOPLE and not your daughter. unless you find the source and abolish the fear your daughter will continue exhibiting social anxiety. something may be happening to her or she may be witnessing something.
Nothing can be addresses as at fault without considering the surroundings, and for a person, it means all the people they have to be in contact with. And for a child..no matter what age..they are always considered a "CHILD" especially by their Mother..and we can actually start right there..and stay there for a long time..There is a book
http://www.amazon.com/Power-Praying-Your-Adult-Children/dp/1594153175
All moms need to read this no matter what they define themselves as spiritually.

Love the one you are with while the are alive, and to do that, put your ego aside
and try helping yourself to help them. Otherwise when it is too late your heart will burn much worse than it is burning now...LISTEN.
 

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@smiley: My therapist specializes in CBT therapy. One thing I would suggest is referring your therapist to Dr. Richards' socialanxietyinstitute.org website for some tips on how to help people with social anxiety disorder. The truth is most therapists don't have much experience with social anxiety, and they try to use forceful methods like exposure therapy early on in the treatment. It would be better if you found a therapist who was gradual in their treatment.
[Removed quotes -Jones-]
 

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Viva La Raza!
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I would go with a therapist that knows CBT. I don't believe that SA is completely 'curable' but I believe that anyone can control their SA to live a relatively normal lifestyle. Just don't expect your daughter to get better right away as it may take awhile. Also please ignore the people that blame their parents for their SA. If you want to know what it is and what causes it, it's better to do your own research than to listen to some bitter people online.
 

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Querdenker
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Although the SA never went away, she has been doing pretty well. I am noticing that as she gets older (she is 16), she is having difficulty coping with comittments. She tends to back out of things at the last minute, and is having alot of anxiety about a strict soccer coach. I am concerned because we are looking at colleges, but with her difficulty in following through on things, I don't want to set her up for failure. My question is this .. my husband sees her lack of following through on comittments as laziness, but I think it has more to do with the anxiety. Is this something that is typical of SA?
Yes, I think it is typical of SA. I have done the same.
 

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Ignorance Really IS Bliss
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I agree 100%
Whoa....this is such crap. While mothers can damage their children, you have to consider biological issues and environmental issues as well.

I would have sneered at the biological/genetic excuse for anxiety and depression until I was diagnosed with it. I spent $1,800 and half a day in a clinical psychologist's office taking a myriad of tests. Meds aggravate my conditions.....it's just a hell I'll live with and always be in as long as I'm in this human body.

As far as environment, have you been in a typical public school, even in the decent upper-middle-class areas??? Kids are CRUEL, and the cruelest ones are acting so to fend off their own insecurities. It's fight or be beaten. Most quiet kids don't have a chance of coming out of middle school normal.

Therapy only works for a child whose perception is genuinely skewed. If she feels like everyone hates her, and everyone really is avoiding her, then she is living in reality and not hallucinating or being paranoid. However, most therapists will say "oh now, do you really think that EVERYONE hates you?" -- well, in her school, everyone but her teachers, and that's everyone to a teenager.

A therapist will make sure that your child's self-esteem and self-worth is in tact, and if not, she'll talk her into believing new things about herself. Next, they'll judge how accurate your child's perceptions are (perception is our personal reality after all). If your child manages to convince the therapist that the other kids really ARE avoiding her at all costs (just using this as an example), then the therapist will attempt to make the child believe that something is wrong with everyone else (they're jealous, insecure, etc).

What it boils down to is that young teens with social anxiety are trying to fit into a broken peer group. I've got one honor student in pre-med, one in high school on Lexapro (possible bipolar), and a depressed 14 year old.....I have a 33% success rate with my kids, and can't say where their successes and problems stem from. If I had it to do over, I would have homeschooled them all and had them spend their days volunteering at local shelters where they could build their people skills amongst kind, intelligent, caring adults. After all, it's the adult world they're going to spend the rest of their lives in.
 

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Ignorance Really IS Bliss
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you might want to ask yourself if you are doing something that is creating this problem that your unaware of... the problem may also originate from other people. the problem always originates from PEOPLE and not your daughter. unless you find the source and abolish the fear your daughter will continue exhibiting social anxiety. something may be happening to her or she may be witnessing something.
John, that is a very uninformed, incorrect explanation you just gave. The problem CAN lie within the person -- it's not always external. Genetics DO play a part in depression AND anxiety disorders. Not all of us are wired the same.
 

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Ignorance Really IS Bliss
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This is quite true. and I agree. When you find the source of the symptoms it's
possible to be cured.
Anxiety is a SYMPTOM? Well, then mine is a symptom of bad genetics......which means meds should be the answer. Meds can alter my "symptoms" alright, but very negatively. Sometimes there is NO "cure."
 

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Next, they'll judge how accurate your child's perceptions are (perception is our personal reality after all). If your child manages to convince the therapist that the other kids really ARE avoiding her at all costs (just using this as an example), then the therapist will attempt to make the child believe that something is wrong with everyone else (they're jealous, insecure, etc).
So the therapist checks the integrity of the patient's reality "map", and, even if it remains intact, might actually attempt to warp/reinforce their experiences with rationalizations (everyone else is jealous, etc)?

That's not a solution, it's a mental bandaid.
 

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Anxiety is a SYMPTOM? Well, then mine is a symptom of bad genetics......which means meds should be the answer. Meds can alter my "symptoms" alright, but very negatively. Sometimes there is NO "cure."
Meds won't adjust genetics, so I'm not seeing
why you say they should be the answer. I'm confused with this
and not following your reasoning.
 
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