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I've always heard that college isn't right for some people. I know it's not right for me. But yet, how is one suppost to get a good job without going to college?
 

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HaloOfDarkness
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I asked myself this same question. I know school isn't right for me but I definitely don't want to work the same minimum wage job I'm working now for the rest of my life. Without a highschool diploma and without a college degree, I don't know how I'm ever going to get out of the situation I'm in. I hate when people think they have all the answers like they think it's so easy to just wake up one morning and head off to college. I'm happy as long as I can pay my rent and buy groceries and basically take care of everything I absolutely need. I work two jobs and I'm pretty sick and tired of one of the jobs and I absolutely hate the other. What I would really like is to have a job that I love waking up for in the morning and to work with people that I love being around. I guess I just haven't found that part of myself yet.
 

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I've always heard that college isn't right for some people. I know it's not right for me. But yet, how is one suppost to get a good job without going to college?
Volunteer work, internships, networking (yes, I know...anathema for just about everyone here), temping, trade school, or just taking any crappy job you can get and working your way up. College degrees these days aren't fit to wipe your butt with unless you are 100% dead set on a career and plan on going for a Master's or PhD.
 

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I've never felt that school was "for me" because it makes me uncomfortable, but I don't want my SAD to ever hold me back, so I made myself go through it anyways. I got my Bachelors and I'm in my Masters program right now. It will be worth it.
 

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I asked myself this same question. I know school isn't right for me but I definitely don't want to work the same minimum wage job I'm working now for the rest of my life. Without a highschool diploma and without a college degree, I don't know how I'm ever going to get out of the situation I'm in. I hate when people think they have all the answers like they think it's so easy to just wake up one morning and head off to college. I'm happy as long as I can pay my rent and buy groceries and basically take care of everything I absolutely need. I work two jobs and I'm pretty sick and tired of one of the jobs and I absolutely hate the other. What I would really like is to have a job that I love waking up for in the morning and to work with people that I love being around. I guess I just haven't found that part of myself yet.
you should be glad you have even one job and you are able to take care of yourself. Im 23 year old physically fit with a clean background and its hard for me to even find a minimum wage job, it got to the point where I had to move back in with my parents. About the college thing it may be worth it in the long run but it is stressful having to force yourself to be around all those people in college.
 

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Yeah, we'd like to think we can get away with skipping that hurdle. It's not possible. Do you really want to manage a grocery store when you're 40? I'm currently in the process of tackling my problems headon so I can hopefully start taking classes again next fall. I haven't taken classes in 4 years.

I've dropped out of community college 3 times already, I'd like to not add to that waste of dollars.

There are plenty of online colleges. I read that GSU Online is one of the cheapest, most reputable online universities. *shrug*
As for me, I know I have to go to physical classes in order to get the work done. Besides, my city's State University is the best on the coast for my major.
 

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im about to start my third year of college. its really difficult academically and socially. ive wanted to quit so many times becauce ive been a loner for two years (except for a few casual friends) and my grades have not been great. its really mentally draining.

but it will be worth it when i graduate (god willing). this is gonna sound like a cliche, but college is a unique opportunity. it throws you in uncomfortable positions (roommates, people, classes, student organizations, etc), which is good for SA'ers. Experiences like that can cure our SA at least just a little bit.

and of course you get the degree, which is not a guarantee that you will find a good job, but it definitely helps.
 

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:ditto

I forgot trade schools. My county has this program called CCS that does anything from carpentry to mechanics to nursing programs.
What you really need to make sure you do is end up in a career you can like - even if it's only a little bit. Trade schools obviously won't get you the bucks of a BA, but as others have posted, I also have friends with a BA who are either unemployed or working for $12 an hour at distributing companies or Whole Foods.
 

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I've always heard that college isn't right for some people. I know it's not right for me. But yet, how is one suppost to get a good job without going to college?
It appears that really good jobs may be a thing of the past. You ask a good question. Where are the good jobs? Essentially, well-paying manufacturing jobs are gone. General Motors used to hire high school graduates and pay them almost $30.00 an hour.

College was very difficult for me. In retrospect, I'm glad I attended college and obtained a degree. However, my degree was worthless. I should have chosen another major. My dad had the same college major, but he was able to capitalize on it. I was not able to do that. My SA clouded everything along with a few other things. More than a few things.

Sadly, a college degree today is not always a ticket to the good life. It used to be. Since the recession, many college graduates are now underemployed, or just plain unemployed.

I recently read a good article about the bleak futures of underemployed college graduates. These graduates tend to have non-scientific degrees in history, political science, mass communications, physical education, business, etc. These majors are not in demand, so many of these graduates are working at the Pizza Hut.

Yes, college isn't for everyone. I'm older now, but I certainly wouldn't attend college in these difficult economic times. College tuition is so expensive now, and it's not worth the cost unless you major in engineering, chemistry, or something like that. Plus, you've got to have a lot on the ball. You've got to be at the top of your college class to get a job. And not all of us are at the top of our class.

Companies are very selective today. More than a few will not even hire someone who has been laid off or who is unemployed. The best of the best are usually retained by a company, or they can find another job very easily because other folks know how smart they are.

A technical college might be a good option. If you like science and technical stuff. Something in computers, cable TV, and auto mechanics.
 

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I wish I'd never bothered with university and learnt a trade or something instead. If you want to get anywhere in life you need some skills. You can get them through a degree but it depends on what degree you do and on what you do in addition to that degree which will support your application for a job in your field e.g. relevant voluntary work or work experience. But you don't have to go the degree route to learn skills which will enable you to earn a decent wage. It's much easier to come through university without learning anything useful (depending on your course) than it is to come through a trade school or a training programme without learning anything useful. I wish I'd just finished school at 16 and gone straight on to train as a plumber or something. I didn't really know all the options that were available to me at that age. All anyone ever talked about was further education so I just went with it. But university really isn't right for everyone.
I agree. I just wish I had liked science and math. I hate science and math. Plumbing would have no interest to me. I wish it did.
 

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I've always heard that college isn't right for some people. I know it's not right for me. But yet, how is one suppost to get a good job without going to college?
John Stossel on 20/20 did a segment that questioned the value of a college education. He interviewed an economist who described a bachelors degree as "The biggest ripoff in America," which is pretty blunt.

Stossel interviewed students who had crushing debt loads from student loans. One was $70,000 in debt for her education and she was working at a job that she could have gotten four years & $70K earlier with just a high school education. Due to all the debt she was forced to move back in with her parents. Of course, her going to college really cost more than just that $70K debt. There is opportunity cost as well. She could have spent those four years at a job getting paid, so even assuming a minimum wage job going to college cost her over $100,000 so that she could end up with a job that paid something like $8 an hour to start.

Stossel pointed out that plumbers don't go to college and don't end up with student loan debt, yet plumbers earn more than the national average income. He interviewed other young adults who were making decent money in skilled trades like auto mechanic unlike their friends who were struggling to find work and pay for their education that failed to provide them with skills of much value.

It seems a college degree is today used as little more than proof that you're at least minimally competent.
 

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John Stossel on 20/20 did a segment that questioned the value of a college education. He interviewed an economist who described a bachelors degree as "The biggest ripoff in America," which is pretty blunt.

Stossel interviewed students who had crushing debt loads from student loans. One was $70,000 in debt for her education and she was working at a job that she could have gotten four years & $70K earlier with just a high school education. Due to all the debt she was forced to move back in with her parents. Of course, her going to college really cost more than just that $70K debt. There is opportunity cost as well. She could have spent those four years at a job getting paid, so even assuming a minimum wage job going to college cost her over $100,000 so that she could end up with a job that paid something like $8 an hour to start.

Stossel pointed out that plumbers don't go to college and don't end up with student loan debt, yet plumbers earn more than the national average income. He interviewed other young adults who were making decent money in skilled trades like auto mechanic unlike their friends who were struggling to find work and pay for their education that failed to provide them with skills of much value.

It seems a college degree is today used as little more than proof that you're at least minimally competent.
Not only are a lot of college graduates in trouble, but a lot of colleges and universities are in trouble.

College endowment funds at some universities are down 25 percent in only one year. They can't even pay their bills, so they've had to issue bonds. I know Princeton University did.

I guess it will take some college graduates decades to recover. If you have a mass communications degree, and you work at the Pizza Hut, you're not honing your mass communicaitons skils. If you don't use something, you lose it.

I think most recent college graduates with an engineering degree are gainfully employed. They're honing their skills every hour on the job. They can transfer those skills to higher paying jobs. It's in the realm of possiblities to apply for an $80k engineering job if you're making $65k.

If you work at the Pizza Hut for three years for $16k, even though you have a mass communications degree, it's normally not in the realm of possiblities to apply for a job that pays $55k a year. You don't go from a $16k job to a $55k job overnight. It's more like a $16k job to $21k, $21k to $27k, and $27k to $33k.
 

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I think most recent college graduates with an engineering degree are gainfully employed. They're honing their skills every hour on the job. They can transfer those skills to higher paying jobs. It's in the realm of possibilities to apply for an $80k engineering job if you're making $65k.
Engineering degrees always offer the highest pay of any undergrad degree. And it's easy to see why. They're damn hard to get. They require one to know a lot of heavy duty math with 3 semesters of serious calculus, unlike my business degree that required just one semester of "calculus for dummies." And that calculus is then put to use in heavy duty physics classes. A couple semesters of chemistry is also required. Engineering is a very demanding degree program and I suspect I'm not the only one who ran away from it after one semester to get a vastly easier degree, such as business.

I think that economist who described bachelors degrees as the biggest rip off in America should have made an exclusion for those degrees that actually train you for a specific type of job. To be an engineer you need a degree in engineering so that degree clearly has real value.

It's not like a philosophy degree that frequently prepares a student to think deeply about why they're earning just over minimum wage after wasting four years of their life.
 

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What you really need to make sure you do is end up in a career you can like -
And therein lies the problem. I hate everything. Anything I have to do is either going to be something I immediately hate or I'm going to learn to hate it with a passion in a short period of time. And that's assuming it's even something that's within the scope of my intellectual capacity. There are lots of things I wouldn't even consider because I know I'm too stupid and I'm not about to throw myself in front of that train.

I'd rather do nothing than be miserable and so that's what I'm doing.
 

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And therein lies the problem. I hate everything. Anything I have to do is either going to be something I immediately hate or I'm going to learn to hate it with a passion in a short period of time. And that's assuming it's even something that's within the scope of my intellectual capacity. There are lots of things I wouldn't even consider because I know I'm too stupid and I'm not about to throw myself in front of that train.
I'm exactly the same way. Whenever I told my parents that, they would ignore it and tell me I wasn't applying myself or that I'm being lazy, but it's 100% true. I just don't fit anywhere in the world, and it's simple as that.
 

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That Quiet Girl
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I'm taking an online course, which is much cheaper and better for people with SA. So I don't have to deal with putting myself out there. I can just take my time and I don't even have to leave the house. The goal is to find a career that would interest you. Do some searching on the net or the library.
 

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I've always heard that college isn't right for some people. I know it's not right for me. But yet, how is one suppost to get a good job without going to college?
Dude I got a really high score in my final year of school and went to a top Australian uni to study commerce. This was back in 2000 and it was the time where my SA and depression flourished and caused me to fcuk up badly. I ended up dropping out in that 1st year and never succeeded at numerous attempts at trying to finish.

However, I still managed to nail a decent salary in a banking role and I was working alongside graduates. Whilst some of them were top notch, many others were mediocre and I know deep down that a bit of paper and 4 years of college doesn't justify my intelligence or potential.

I still feel it is essential and would do anything to go back to uni and get that damned degree (and MBA). But I'm so anxious I'll stuff it up again and rack up a massive debt :|

To answer your q'n though, you can still do well without going to college. It depends on how much hard work you put in.

In Australia, the CEO of McDonald's doesn't have a uni degree and he worked his way up from flipping burgers as a 15 yr old drop out to running the show in this nation and south-east asia.
 

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yea i totally understand what ur saying! i'm about to start college in a couple of weeks, yet im having doubts about it, and if i'm truly good enough to handle college:( i have been considering withdrawing from uni quite a bit lately and i secretly want to pursue a career in truck driving, but i know for a fact that my family will not support that career choice.
 

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Engineering degrees always offer the highest pay of any undergrad degree. And it's easy to see why. They're damn hard to get. They require one to know a lot of heavy duty math with 3 semesters of serious calculus, unlike my business degree that required just one semester of "calculus for dummies." And that calculus is then put to use in heavy duty physics classes. A couple semesters of chemistry is also required. Engineering is a very demanding degree program and I suspect I'm not the only one who ran away from it after one semester to get a vastly easier degree, such as business.

I think that economist who described bachelors degrees as the biggest rip off in America should have made an exclusion for those degrees that actually train you for a specific type of job. To be an engineer you need a degree in engineering so that degree clearly has real value.

It's not like a philosophy degree that frequently prepares a student to think deeply about why they're earning just over minimum wage after wasting four years of their life.
I agree. An engineering degree is not a piece of cake.

My best friend in high school got an electrical engineering degree. And then he got an MBA after that. He was building ham radios by himself when he was barely in diapers. Not quite. But he was building his own ham radio when he was 16. Maybe a little sooner. He just ate that stuff up.

After I got my easy college degree, I did try a number of other things. I took some computer and accounting courses. It was not a good fit.
 
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