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Do you feel like you suffered from it?

When I was a little kid I had a lot of fear of getting damned for my thoughts. My mom had explained that God knows everything you think and I found the logical consequences to be really disturbing. Since blasphemy can occur in your mind I started having intrusive blasphemous thoughts I didn't want. And blasphemy against the Holy Spirit isn't just a damnable offense, it's the single unforgivable sin.

I also eventually had intrusive thoughts about selling my soul to the devil. I was concerned I might do it with a thought and I wouldn't be able to undo it. I know that's crazy, but I was a child and it really isn't hard to think of examples of passages that support the idea that you can go to hell for the wrong thoughts running through your head. And I was very much aware of those passages because I was reading the Bible at a young age as well as attending church and CCD.

So I think that I was caused a lot of distress as kid by being taught the things I was. And now I look at other adults who have variations of that. They don't believe in hell so they are afraid of going to hell for not believing in it (again for having the wrong thoughts). There are adults living with some level of fear because they were trained to have it for so long that intellectually understanding that it's baseless does not always make it go away.

I also wonder about what it does to your thought process. Does teaching a child to believe things without evidence damage their ability to recognize what is true in other areas?

Edit:
I put this in atheist support because I was thinking about this from the perspective of whether atheists feel like their previous religious backgrounds had a practical detriment to their lives, especially one that has lasted since becoming atheists. I'm not sure if it might be better in agnosticism, atheism, and religion.
 

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Yeah I've had all those thoughts too when I was younger. I would not even want the thought but I would just think it n then I'd be afraid.
Sometimes an ingrained fear pops up in my head and for a second I'm still that child again and not logic.
 

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I was pretty much JW indoctrinated until I was about 17 when I broke free from all that b******t. When I think about it I can't believe how many stupid fears I used to have back then. There is no doubt religion had a major contribution to my SA and other issues I have.
 

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From around the age of 8 until maybe 19 or so I was constantly exposed and indoctrinated with religion. As a result, everything I saw held a religious undertone. My understanding of the world and myself was derived from religion. It became who I was. I knew where I wanted to go and what I needed to do to get there. It wasn't until a little later in my college career that I started questioning things. I became exposed to a different world where challenging ideas, especially in search of rationality, was more accepted. Critical thinking and decision making based on my own perception unfiltered by the lens of religion really opened up the world for me. I'm hardly as religious as I was back when I was 19. At that time, everything for me was seen as either a step in the path to heaven or hell. I lived in fear of disappointing God and gathering too many sins to enter heaven. For a while I was finding peace in having so much faith and conviction that I was indeed on the right path. I spent a few years during my teenage phase accepting what I was told and really spending time learning about teachings and the like. I became more confident and calm. Despite what I gained the rationality of such a religion and such beliefs really started bothering me. I found myself analyzing certain parts of the religion and concluding the impossibility and twisted ending of it all. I began thinking, quite clearly, that it was all man made.

However, I have not dismissed a higher being. I think my religious upbringing and dedication in my teens years permeated too far deep for me to completely dismantle the notion of a God. I'm much less inclined to believe in certain things, especially heaven and hell. It just seems like something man would have created. I must admit my less religious self tends to have moral arguments quite often. The difficulty of establishing moral truths for myself has become so much more challenging given the lack of guidelines and fear once placed for me by religion.
 

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Do you feel like you suffered from it?

When I was a little kid I had a lot of fear of getting damned for my thoughts. My mom had explained that God knows everything you think and I found the logical consequences to be really disturbing. Since blasphemy can occur in your mind I started having intrusive blasphemous thoughts I didn't want. And blasphemy against the Holy Spirit isn't just a damnable offense, it's the single unforgivable sin.

I also eventually had intrusive thoughts about selling my soul to the devil. I was concerned I might do it with a thought and I wouldn't be able to undo it. I know that's crazy, but I was a child and it really isn't hard to think of examples of passages that support the idea that you can go to hell for the wrong thoughts running through your head. And I was very much aware of those passages because I was reading the Bible at a young age as well as attending church and CCD.

So I think that I was caused a lot of distress as kid by being taught the things I was. And now I look at other adults who have variations of that. They don't believe in hell so they are afraid of going to hell for not believing in it (again for having the wrong thoughts). There are adults living with some level of fear because they were trained to have it for so long that intellectually understanding that it's baseless does not always make it go away.

I also wonder about what it does to your thought process. Does teaching a child to believe things without evidence damage their ability to recognize what is true in other areas?

Edit:
I put this in atheist support because I was thinking about this from the perspective of whether atheists feel like their previous religious backgrounds had a practical detriment to their lives, especially one that has lasted since becoming atheists. I'm not sure if it might be better in agnosticism, atheism, and religion.
I suffered from religious indoctrination and alternative medicine indoctrination. Genetics and environment determine how much we're affected by such things, so you're going to see a spectrum with varying levels of damage. People who try to control their kids (even if they had good intentions) are a threat to society.
 

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They tried and they gave up. I've seen the effects in adults, though. Plenty of people who hate themselves and think they're disgusting for things that are natural or can't be helped.
 
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