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sa challenger
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So far I took my daughter once to a student doing her masters work. So, she is getting her experience from people like us, who have no insurance and are drawn in by the low cost. My daughter has been crying for no concrete reason. Dr. said she was depressed and anxious. Prescribed clonazepam and lexapro. Never had any experience with those.

Do you think she'll be ok with a student counselor, or do you think I should spend much more money on a professional?
 

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Well...

Hi!

I myself am an MSW student and I have clients that I see every week. Your concern is one that I have thought of too. Social work interns are always debating whether or not we should be given clients to work with because we are not very experienced. I believe that nobody should have to suffer because I'm trying to have a learning experience.

If it gives you any solace, however, know that we are being monitored very closely. We have field instructors and advisors that funnel their knowledge through us and (hopefully) out to the patients. Our school experience is very intense. We are constantly reading, discussing and trying to understand how to bring aid to clients the best way we can.
An intern's clients are also looked after by their supervisor (though the client does not see how it happens, it does. Interns have to submit very long reports about what goes on in each session with a client). If our supervisors don't like what we're doing or don't think we are effective they will remove that client from us.

What I'm trying to say is: the clients come first.

If you are not satisfied with an SWI (social work intern) you have every right to ask for someone that is an LCSW (liscensed clinical social worker). The SWI would actually prefer that; as s/he is looking out for your needs (and, in this case, the needs of your daughter) foremost.

I hope it all works out!

Best!

C.
 

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I'd strongly suggest that you get a second opinion. A therapist suggested at age 12 that I go on meds, my parents refused & I ended up getting medicated later, but I'm glad they waited. Medication is a big deal, esp. for children, there can be side effects like headaches & confusion ... Esp if you don't know whether to trust the therapist. Just 1 or 2 visits, lots of professionals use the sliding scale & that way you'll know whether they think another type of therapy can be used first.
 

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sa challenger
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi!

I myself am an MSW student and I have clients that I see every week. Your concern is one that I have thought of too. Social work interns are always debating whether or not we should be given clients to work with because we are not very experienced. I believe that nobody should have to suffer because I'm trying to have a learning experience.

If it gives you any solace, however, know that we are being monitored very closely. We have field instructors and advisors that funnel their knowledge through us and (hopefully) out to the patients. Our school experience is very intense. We are constantly reading, discussing and trying to understand how to bring aid to clients the best way we can.
An intern's clients are also looked after by their supervisor (though the client does not see how it happens, it does. Interns have to submit very long reports about what goes on in each session with a client). If our supervisors don't like what we're doing or don't think we are effective they will remove that client from us.

What I'm trying to say is: the clients come first.

If you are not satisfied with an SWI (social work intern) you have every right to ask for someone that is an LCSW (liscensed clinical social worker). The SWI would actually prefer that; as s/he is looking out for your needs (and, in this case, the needs of your daughter) foremost.

I hope it all works out!

Best!

C.
Thanks for replying. It helps to hear again that the intern is being monitored by her supervisor. We went again today and it was a little more comfortable. It's scary because this could be a life and death situation, but so far it seems ok.
 

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sa challenger
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd strongly suggest that you get a second opinion. A therapist suggested at age 12 that I go on meds, my parents refused & I ended up getting medicated later, but I'm glad they waited. Medication is a big deal, esp. for children, there can be side effects like headaches & confusion ... Esp if you don't know whether to trust the therapist. Just 1 or 2 visits, lots of professionals use the sliding scale & that way you'll know whether they think another type of therapy can be used first.
A separate doctor prescribed the meds, but that was weird too, because she took the results of a quick survey plus my daughter and my's input, and came back 5 min. later with the 2 prescriptions. I thought the doc was going to look into physical causes first, but doc said my daughter tested moderately depressed, and she has been in to the school counselor's office several times due to anxiety/crying episodes during class, so maybe that was enough to go on.

Also, my daughter is 17, and we are close, and we have both had some previous experience with counseling, but for her it's been very professional counseling for Aspergers, never for depression or anxiety, so that is why I'm so concerned.

Thanks for posting!

I definitely have in mind the possibility of a second opinion, and I go in to the counseling with my daughter, because with her Asperger's she has in the past had a hard time opening up. She's pleasingly doing well so far with talking, and I'm trying very hard to be quiet.
 
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