Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
God damn it I always do something like this.
I purchased an electirc guitar and amp and they don't go well together or sound good and I just sort of rushed into it. I made the mistake of buying an electric guitar and trying to learn that before classical.
I had one when I was younger but had to sell it, I needed the money at the time but yeah any suggestions, I decided I want to play classical and then move to electrical. This is so annoying.

By the way ~I have an Epiphone Les Paul Studio and a Peavey vypyr 30 amp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,211 Posts
You could take them back to the place you got them from, explain that they don't go well together, and ask if you could, for example, swap the amp for another one. You could also just put it down to experience and try to sell them.
 

·
Permanently bored
Joined
·
2,813 Posts
I've been playing for about 10 years and I started learning to play classical, but I got tired of it and moved to electric almost straight away. Nothing classical-specific that I learned helped me play electric any better and I improved much faster playing electric. If you actually want to play classical guitar, then by all means learn it, but if you intend to play electric guitar, learn electric guitar. I'm not sure what gear you've got, but you won't get FANTASTIC tone out of beginner stuff, and you certainly won't get good tone without good technique, which you'll pick up over time. If you're serious about learning, stick with it. Most people who learn classical first but intend to play electric regret it because it's really a waste of time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nah i think I'll stick with it I want to learn electrical and classical but I'm gonna just stick with it and get good. I've got time, just gonna learn this thing through books and if @i get a classical guitar I 'd see a teacher.
Is it possible to get good learning by yourself also can you give me some tips on where to go next after mastering the basic chords.
 

·
blessed with lucky sevens
Joined
·
840 Posts
You could still finger pick classical style with your les paul dude, nothing stoppin' you from doing that. In fact, the great 'Robby Krieger' from Rock & Roll band 'The Doors' didn't use a pick but stuck to finger picking style with long finger nails on his electric guitars. :) You could be the next robby krieger man!

Here's a clip of him playing flamenco on a spanish guitar and mentioning about how he used same techniques with the electric guitar.
 

·
Permanently bored
Joined
·
2,813 Posts
I'm mainly self-taught and I'm "ok". Here's a good tip though, don't just learn how to play songs and a few chords. Learn some music theory, it may seem like a daunting task and it may not seem to be of much benefit at first but it'll make it far easier to learn songs when you can simply listen to them and identify what you're hearing. It'll also make composition and improvisation far easier when you understand what's going on.

Start by learning to read music, you'll learn some of the essentials in the process, then move onto memorising the fretboard, using scales and modes, chord construction and harmony. It might not seem like much fun starting with something that you probably won't be using, like reading music, but that's where I started when I became "serious" about music. Remember, being a good musician is more important than being a good guitarist.

Don't ignore technique either, but don't focus on it. Just go up and down scales whenever you're bored/have nothing to do, mix it up and improvise over a backing track if you're really bored. Just don't get too focused on playing other peoples songs regardless of if you understand them or not, because it'll be alot harder to apply new things to your playing once you've been playing for a long time. I started out like that, learned some songs, scales and chords, came up with a few patterns and got locked into playing the same boring patterns over everything and even though I was coming up with great stuff in my head with my new found understanding of music, I couldn't apply it to the instrument because I'd got so used to playing the same stuff all the time. It took a while to break out of that.

But most of all, have fun.. there's no point in having a hobby that isn't enjoyable.
 

·
Born Of Blotmonað
Joined
·
19,174 Posts
If you have issues with your gear, particularly your amplification then you can go back to the store as someone mentioned though I would suggest with an extra $100 or something because of the likely hood that an upgrade will cost a bit more even with the trade in.

If with the classical issue your main thing is the fingerstyle approach to guitar then there are many folk artists you can look to to pick up on that & as mentioned about The Doors guitarist there are great things to be done playing fingerstyle on electric. I've recently taken to it & I find it's great. Clean tone through an amp on a electric with some reverb & fingerstyle sounds great.

There's also as mentioned above the classical lead approach shown which takes much practice but still another route

Finally, I'm a self taught player, I've not had any formal training on any of the instruments I play. I don't know music theory but through watching & listening to friends as well as people I admire & guitar magazines I've become a decent player. You can check my links below to hear some of my old demos
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the tips and to canadian brotha, your good.
Are there books that teach you to read music or any other good sources to help me along my way, also from chords to what next, where do i go after that?
 

·
king of the road
Joined
·
175 Posts
Thanks for the tips and to canadian brotha, your good.
Are there books that teach you to read music or any other good sources to help me along my way, also from chords to what next, where do i go after that?
There are plenty of good books, but some of them can be a bit overwhelming. I think this first question to ask is what type of music do you want to play? If you want to play classical music or jazz, learning music theory is a must. If you want to play rock or folk, you don't really need to learn music theory, as there are many rock and folk musicians that don't know music theory. If you want to play blues or bluegrass, it's good to at least learn the basics of music theory.

A good alternative to learning to read music is using tablature. It's a very simple numbering system that requires no knowledge of music theory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Where did you buy it? Some places have awesome return policies. I remember years ago I bought a pedal from Guitar Center and I didn't like the way it sounded so I brought it back and they took it with no questions whatsoever.

I think Musicians Friend has a similar return policy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I bought it from digital village, and to learn music theory ehre do I start, books, are there books for learning music theory?
 

·
Born Of Blotmonað
Joined
·
19,174 Posts
I forgot to mention guitar tabs, learning to read them was integral to my self teaching as that's how I accessed the lessons available in guitar magazines. They are usually printed in both theoretical & tab form which is great.

There are many books on theory but if you're just starting you may want to look into beginners video lessons. I don't know any off the top of my head but they are available. Also check www.justinguitar.com. Someone linked me to his site & he has a ton of free lessons many of which have youtube vids to go with them
 

·
Born Of Blotmonað
Joined
·
19,174 Posts
90% of a guitars sound comes from the amp
I have to disagree with this some, a good player can make a cheap guitar & amp sound half decent. Also an electric made of a good solid wood will sound good without even being plugged in, it'll have a good resonance. Finally my personal check of electric guitars as a way of gauging tone is plugging in to an amp and jamming clean tone with a bit of reverb. An amp that sound bright & clear with a clean tone electric will sound beautiful with effects added on top if that's your thing
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
333 Posts
I have to disagree with this some, a good player can make a cheap guitar & amp sound half decent. Also an electric made of a good solid wood will sound good without even being plugged in, it'll have a good resonance. Finally my personal check of electric guitars as a way of gauging tone is plugging in to an amp and jamming clean tone with a bit of reverb. An amp that sound bright & clear with a clean tone electric will sound beautiful with effects added on top if that's your thing
I meant that a crappy guitar played on a good amp sounds better than, a good guitar played on a crappy amp.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top