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Making No Apologies
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Discussion Starter #1
I display alot of the traits for BDP (thinking in black and white, stormy relationships, manipulative,chronic depression, self mutilation, intense anger,etc) and I also meet the requirements for what they claim can cause this disorder. I really identify with alot of the stories that Ive read on it and Ive been doing research for weeks.

However, I was never diagnosed with this. I was diagnosed with chronic clinical depression, GAD, SAD, and possibly Bipolar disorder. I think that if I had mentioned certain things from my past that the overall diagnosis wouldve been BPD because it pretty much encompasses all of those things.

My question to those of you who have actually been diagnosed with BDP (if any of you have), will being diagnosed with this be helpful or hurtful? Does the fact that BDP covers so many issues make it harder to treat? Should I just stick with my previous diagnosis and continue to be treated for individual issues when I return to therapy?
 

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I don't have borderline personality disorder, but from what I have read (I obsessively read about this stuff, but am not an expert by any means), I should warn you that there is a fair degree of stigma, not just with the general population, but even with doctors who should know better. So if you face any discrimination, just switch doctors. If you get a diagnosis of "borderline" I wouldn't share it with anyone other than those closest to you, because of the misconceptions about the disorder.

Although medications are marginally helpful for treating the symptoms of borderline personality disorder, psychotherapy can address some of the deeper issues (for instance, if you have issues with abandonment, or a history of abuse). I don't know your history of course, but you should feel free to discuss with your therapist any issues from your past if you feel that they have contributed to who you are today. What you should look for in a doctor is someone who can not only empathize but also believes in your inner strength and your ability to change. People with borderline personality disorder are fully capable of recovery and living a happy, fulfilling life. It is challenging, though.

People with borderline personality disorder have also been shown to have differences in brain chemistry that lends to impulsive behavior and severe mood swings. So it is a complex mixture of neurological and environmental factors that make it difficult to treat. I would try to find someone who specializes in the disorder if you really believe that you have it.
 

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Making No Apologies
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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah thats kinda what I was thinking, I'll have to find a specialist. Poot, lol. I know of the stigma of mental illness, and the side eyes I get from only having been diagnosed with with the other three will be nothing compared to what I'll get if I let it slip about the BDP. Its gonna be one of those deep, dark secrets, trust me, lol.

Thanks for the advice
 

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BPD is definitely something you should get properly diagnosed and treated for. Dialectic Behavioral Therapy is the most effective treatment. If you are diagnosed, find a therapist who specializes in the disorder. Many therapists won't see patients with BPD as they can be difficult to treat.

I'm not sure how old you are, but the symptoms tend to peak in your early 30's. I met my wife when she was 18, and she always had what I now know to be BPD. After getting misdiagnosed with just about all of the things you mentioned, and being put on all the wrong medications, she was finally diagnosed when she was about 32. By this time, she had gone significantly downhill and had developed severe substance issues as a way to deal with it. She tried therapy for it, but the BPD was too overpowering. She committed suicide seven months ago. She was 34.

I wish I (and her) would have known what it was in the early years and recognized the signs, because she definitely could have managed it if caught earlier, but between the BPD and the substances, it became hopeless.

Good luck. I know that it can be a very difficult situation to deal with, but if it does turn out to be the problem, there is lots of help out there.
 

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Making No Apologies
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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all the advice.

UKPhobe, did you actually go throught DBT, and if so, how did you deal with the group element that Ive been reading about?
 

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Thanks for all the advice.

UKPhobe, did you actually go throught DBT, and if so, how did you deal with the group element that Ive been reading about?
I've done some DBT, mostly just Mindfulness, Emotional Regulation and Distress Tolerence. I've not done group therapy under DBT but i have done normal group therapy.
 

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Making No Apologies
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Discussion Starter #8
UKPhobe, thanks for the quick response. The only group 'therapy' Ive ever been in is Al-Anon and Im assuming this is going to be more intensive. Even if I dont get diagnosed with BPD (yea right) DBT is sounding like it would be benificial. Ugh, I need insurance :(
 

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UKPhobe, thanks for the quick response. The only group 'therapy' Ive ever been in is Al-Anon and Im assuming this is going to be more intensive. Even if I dont get diagnosed with BPD (yea right) DBT is sounding like it would be benificial. Ugh, I need insurance :(
I doubt it'll be vastly different actually, if anything actually it'll probably be more pleasent since they'll focus on calming emotions rather then just the usual "chit chat" that comes with standard group therapy plus you'll learn the techniques standard to DBT in a group setting.
 

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Fitting In Here & There
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LookingforPeace, I'm sorry to hear about your wife.

Karmakatcher, I just started reading the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook by Matthew McKay, Ph. D.; Jeffrey Wood, Psy. D.; & Jeffrey Brantley, MD. It teaches:

Distress Tolerance
Mindfulness
Emotion Regualtion
Interpersonal Effectiveness​

This workbook is not just for Borderlines. It looks like it could be very useful for many people!

It's true that many therapists don't want to treat Borderline Personalities because they think they are too hard to treat. I have what they refer to as Borderline "features" and I can tell that my symptoms just piss the therapist off sometimes. But tough luck. We don't go to therapy to be friends or have a pleasant social hour; we go to get HELP. The dynamics of a Borderline are different than most other patients and the therapist should be trained, prepared, and professional enough to be able to handle it. If not, they shouldn't do it cuz it'll likely make the patient worse. (I have read about this topic for years, and would like to go back to grad school to be a therapist who is up for the challenge of treating Borderlines.)

If you really do have BPD, then there is no use trying to avoid the diagnosis. You CAN be CURED of it. It is NOT a terminal illness, you know?
 

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Making No Apologies
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Discussion Starter #11
LookingforPeace, I'm sorry to hear about your wife.

Karmakatcher, I just started reading the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook by Matthew McKay, Ph. D.; Jeffrey Wood, Psy. D.; & Jeffrey Brantley, MD. It teaches:

Distress Tolerance
Mindfulness
Emotion Regualtion
Interpersonal Effectiveness​

This workbook is not just for Borderlines. It looks like it could be very useful for many people!

It's true that many therapists don't want to treat Borderline Personalities because they think they are too hard to treat. I have what they refer to as Borderline "features" and I can tell that my symptoms just piss the therapist off sometimes. But tough luck. We don't go to therapy to be friends or have a pleasant social hour; we go to get HELP. The dynamics of a Borderline are different than most other patients and the therapist should be trained, prepared, and professional enough to be able to handle it. If not, they shouldn't do it cuz it'll likely make the patient worse. (I have read about this topic for years, and would like to go back to grad school to be a therapist who is up for the challenge of treating Borderlines.)

If you really do have BPD, then there is no use trying to avoid the diagnosis. You CAN be CURED of it. It is NOT a terminal illness, you know?
Thank you for the book recommendation. Researching this has been a whirlwind and since I dont have insurance right now (hmph) this will be a good alternative for a month or so, or til I get a "real" job.
 

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Beautiful Mess
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The whole psy world hates borderline because we are so hard to treat and because health insurance does not like to pay for our treatment. We are considered their worst patients an they hate us.
 

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I did DBT about 2 years ago. The coping skills and such I learned then are still helping me out today.
 

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LookingforPeace, I'm sorry to hear about your wife.

Karmakatcher, I just started reading the Dialectical Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook by Matthew McKay, Ph. D.; Jeffrey Wood, Psy. D.; & Jeffrey Brantley, MD. It teaches:

Distress Tolerance
Mindfulness
Emotion Regualtion
Interpersonal Effectiveness​

This workbook is not just for Borderlines. It looks like it could be very useful for many people!

It's true that many therapists don't want to treat Borderline Personalities because they think they are too hard to treat. I have what they refer to as Borderline "features" and I can tell that my symptoms just piss the therapist off sometimes. But tough luck. We don't go to therapy to be friends or have a pleasant social hour; we go to get HELP. The dynamics of a Borderline are different than most other patients and the therapist should be trained, prepared, and professional enough to be able to handle it. If not, they shouldn't do it cuz it'll likely make the patient worse. (I have read about this topic for years, and would like to go back to grad school to be a therapist who is up for the challenge of treating Borderlines.)

If you really do have BPD, then there is no use trying to avoid the diagnosis. You CAN be CURED of it. It is NOT a terminal illness, you know?
I've got that book, it is excellent even if you only suffer from the traits.

My therapist described it as Borderline "Traits" for me interestingly enough.
 

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Fitting In Here & There
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Not to confuse things, but sometimes BPD can be confused with PTSD. If a person had early loss and or chronic abuse in childhood, (I had both) it can cause Complex PTSD for sure, but also qualify a person for BPD in some cases. :um
 

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Not to confuse things, but sometimes BPD can be confused with PTSD. If a person had early loss and or chronic abuse in childhood, (I had both) it can cause Complex PTSD for sure, but also qualify a person for BPD in some cases. :um
I was diagnosed with PTSD as a result of bullying and abuse which my last therapist was aware off but she still described it as BPD traits.

Either way i don't think it really matters since the DPT i was on and the book have helped.

Most of the symptoms relate to difficulties with emotions and stress.
 

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Although medications are marginally helpful for treating the symptoms of borderline personality disorder, psychotherapy can address some of the deeper issues (for instance, if you have issues with abandonment, or a history of abuse).
I'd have to disagree on the "marginally" part. Drugs acting on serotonin/dopamine/opioid pathways will greatly counteract the feelings of dysphoria and anxiety experienced by BPD people. Dopamine can inflate feelings of self-worth and confidence; two things low in BPD (dopamine can exacerbate psychosis however). Serotonin will increase empathy and emotional stability.

I'd say fluoxetine + pramipexole + buprenorphine would be amazing for BPD, as it is in most problems. Might need to add an NRI to offset low blood pressure though.
 
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