Social Anxiety Support Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently saw Girl, Interupted with Winona Ryder and at the end of the movie her character was cured from Borderline Personality. I had never even heard of it until then so I decided to look it up just to see what it was and now I think I may have some of the symtoms. Does anybody on here have it? It sounds like it's pretty similar to Bipolar just not the high-highs and low-lows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Some doctors consider it to be on the 'bipolar spectrum' - others say it isn't related. I don't think it is well portrayed in 'Girl Interrupted'. Often, those with the diagnosis have a history of abuse (esp sexual abuse). I think the next DSM might reclassify it as a PTSD/mood disorder. 'Personality disorder' isn't a helpful label.
 

·
dazed and confused
Joined
·
960 Posts
I've taken several of those personality disorder tests, and if I can believe the results, the guys in the white coats with the butterfly nets will be on their way soon to pick me up and stick me in a padded cell :eek:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,689 Posts
I don't think there is a single mental health diagnosis which is used in a more confusing and conflicting manner than Borderline Personality Disorder. Before you can decide if someone has it you have to decide which definition of it you want to use. And for whatever reason, if your a female and report having been a childhood victim of sexual abuse its almost guaranteed that the mental health professionals will say you are a Borderline.

Anyway, my OWN definition of Borderline PD is that the Bipolars are the happy drunks and the Borderlines are the mean drunks. Bipolars go from manic to depressed, Borderlines go from manic to angry. Its not an improvement. But if you ask half a dozen people what it is you will get half a dozen answers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,560 Posts
I don't think there is a single mental health diagnosis which is used in a more confusing and conflicting manner than Borderline Personality Disorder. Before you can decide if someone has it you have to decide which definition of it you want to use. And for whatever reason, if your a female and report having been a childhood victim of sexual abuse its almost guaranteed that the mental health professionals will say you are a Borderline.

Anyway, my OWN definition of Borderline PD is that the Bipolars are the happy drunks and the Borderlines are the mean drunks. Bipolars go from manic to depressed, Borderlines go from manic to angry. Its not an improvement. But if you ask half a dozen people what it is you will get half a dozen answers.
I deal with a couple of borderline clients where I work. Their mood can swing from one extreme to the other. One minute they are mad at the world, and then the next they are happy and go lucky. One of mine yesterday become mad at staff and stopped talking to them. She was suppose to come see me yesterday. Staff asked me what to do. I told them to just leave her be. If anyone goes around her trying to get her to talk she will strike out. You will be having a chair being flung at you. The best thing to do is to leave her alone. Eventually her mood will change. Well a few minutes after the staff left the house without her she called me. She was very friendly and laughing. You never know how they will be minute to minute.
 

·
Beautiful Mess
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
I have both bipolar and borderline. The big difference is the thinking patterns. Here are a few examples of borderline thinking patterns:

1. All-or-nothing thinking - You see things in black-or-white categories. If a situation falls short of perfect, you see it as a total failure. When a young woman on a diet ate a spoonful of ice cream, she told herself, "I've blown my diet completely." This thought upset her so much that she gobbled down an entire quart of ice cream.

2. Overgeneralization - You see a single negative event, such as a romantic rejection or a career reversal, as a never-ending pattern of defeat by using words such as "always" or "never" when you think about it. A depressed salesman became terribly upset when he noticed bird dung on the window of his car. He told himself, "Just my luck! Birds are always crapping on my car!"

3. Mental Filter - You pick out a single negative detail and dwell on it exclusively, so that your vision of reality becomes darkened, like the drop of ink that discolors a beaker of water. Example: You receive many positive comments about your presentation to a group of associates at work, but one of them says something mildly critical. You obsess about his reaction for days and ignore all the positive feedback.

4. Discounting the positive - You reject positive experiences by insisting that they "don't count." If you do a good job, you may tell yourself that it wasn't good enough or that anyone could have done as well. Discounting the positives takes the joy out of life and makes you feel inadequate and unrewarded.

5. Jumping to conclusions - You interpret things negatively when there are no facts to support your conclusion.

Mind Reading : Without checking it out, you arbitrarily conclude that someone is reacting negatively to you.

Fortune-telling : You predict that things will turn out badly. Before a test you may tell yourself, "I'm really going to blow it. What if I flunk?" If you're depressed you may tell yourself, "I'll never get better."

6. Magnification - You exaggerate the importance of your problems and shortcomings, or you minimize the importance of your desirable qualities. This is also called the "binocular trick."

7. Emotional Reasoning - You assume that your negative emotions necessarily reflect the way things really are: "I feel terrified about going on airplanes. It must be very dangerous to fly." Or, "I feel guilty. I must be a rotten person." Or, "I feel angry. This proves that I'm being treated unfairly." Or, "I feel so inferior. This means I'm a second rate person." Or, "I feel hopeless. I must really be hopeless."

8. "Should" statements - You tell yourself that things should be the way you hoped or expected them to be. After playing a difficult piece on the piano, a gifted pianist told herself, "I shouldn't have made so many mistakes." This made her feel so disgusted that she quit practicing for several days. "Musts," "oughts" and "have tos" are similar offenders.

"Should statements" that are directed against yourself lead to guilt and frustration. Should statements that are directed against other people or the world in general, lead to anger and frustration: "He shouldn't be so stubborn and argumentative!"

Many people try to motivate themselves with shoulds and shouldn'ts, as if they were delinquents who had to be punished before they could be expected to do anything. "I shouldn't eat that doughnut." This usually doesn't work because all these shoulds and musts make you feel rebellious and you get the urge to do just the opposite. Dr. Albert Ellis has called this " must erbation." I call it the "shouldy" approach to life.

9. Labeling - Labeling is an extreme form of all-or-nothing thinking. Instead of saying "I made a mistake," you attach a negative label to yourself: "I'm a loser." You might also label yourself "a fool" or "a failure" or "a jerk." Labeling is quite irrational because you are not the same as what you do. Human beings exist, but "fools," "losers" and "jerks" do not. These labels are just useless abstractions that lead to anger, anxiety, frustration and low self-esteem.

You may also label others. When someone does something that rubs you the wrong way, you may tell yourself: "He's an S.O.B." Then you feel that the problem is with that person's "character" or "essence" instead of with their thinking or behavior. You see them as totally bad. This makes you feel hostile and hopeless about improving things and leaves very little room for constructive communication.

10. Personalization and Blame - Personalization comes when you hold yourself personally responsible for an event that isn't entirely under your control. When a woman received a note that her child was having difficulty in school, she told herself, "This shows what a bad mother I am," instead of trying to pinpoint the cause of the problem so that she could be helpful to her child. When another woman's husband beat her, she told herself, "If only I was better in bed, he wouldn't beat me." Personalization leads to guilt, shame and feelings of inadequacy.

Some people do the opposite. They blame other people or their circumstances for their problems, and they overlook ways they might be contributing to the problem: "The reason my marriage is so lousy is because my spouse is totally unreasonable." Blame usually doesn't work very well because other people will resent being scapegoated and they will just toss the blame right back in your lap. It's like the game of hot potato--no one wants to get stuck with it.



Borderline has affected my life more than bi polar has. I am working on a DBT self help book to get better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Miss May - seems that most of these are related to low self esteem - and many of them are things that perfectly 'healthy' and normal people do/think/feel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
Anyway, my OWN definition of Borderline PD is that the Bipolars are the happy drunks and the Borderlines are the mean drunks. Bipolars go from manic to depressed, Borderlines go from manic to angry. Its not an improvement. But if you ask half a dozen people what it is you will get half a dozen answers.
I don't agree - most or at least many people with bipolar disorder experience 'mixed episodes', 'dysphoric manias', 'agitated depressions' etc. I heard someone once say that those with 'borderline' respond to things around them - their mood is very reactive - whereas those with bipolar disorder experience mood swings that don't seem related to events around them - (although stress can trigger swings etc) - but as you pointed out, there are so many diffuclties defining borderline.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
Miss May - seems that most of these are related to low self esteem - and many of them are things that perfectly 'healthy' and normal people do/think/feel.
Yeah but someone with bpd has these thoughts 24/7 at full blast and can't seperate themselves from it. A "normal" person will experience some of these things but they can seperate themselves from it. In bpd your moods "control" you.
 

·
Beautiful Mess
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
borderline personality disorder also is known as having over whelming emotions. Like if someone tells me NO I throw a temper tantrum. that is the borderline in me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
I can identify with so many diagnoses it confuses me...

The bipolar symptoms above, i can relate to every one. Same with BPD.
I can actually relate to most of the symptoms of a sociopath, even though I wouldn't consider myself one (my behaviours can explain more than my beliefs, i enjoy changing the way people think)

After a while i was running around in circles of definitions from the manuals of psychology, even though the main symptoms of my problems fit in with social anxiety.

Personally I think our neural networks are way too complex for such few labels, I guess it's good when people can relate to a small set of symptoms, but i can relate to loads and it makes me feel lost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
88 Posts
I can identify with so many diagnoses it confuses me...

The bipolar symptoms above, i can relate to every one. Same with BPD.
I can actually relate to most of the symptoms of a sociopath, even though I wouldn't consider myself one (my behaviours can explain more than my beliefs, i enjoy changing the way people think)

After a while i was running around in circles of definitions from the manuals of psychology, even though the main symptoms of my problems fit in with social anxiety.

Personally I think our neural networks are way too complex for such few labels, I guess it's good when people can relate to a small set of symptoms, but i can relate to loads and it makes me feel lost.
We all can - everyone that reads about psychiatric conditions can fit themselves into several of them - we all have traits of some of them - that's what makes us human. We are all pretty complex - some more than others. I suggest you stop reading about the different diagnoses. Doctors diagnose a patient with a disorder if that patient's behaviour causes them a lot of distress, and if they meet several of the symptoms in one cluster. I read somewhere that the vast majority of the general population would meet the diagnositc criteria for at least one PD if they were to fill out those diagnostic questionnaire tests.
MissMay - i hope the self help book works for you - having a mood disorder and borderline traits must make life a challenge at times.
 

·
Beautiful Mess
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
We all can - everyone that reads about psychiatric conditions can fit themselves into several of them - we all have traits of some of them - that's what makes us human. We are all pretty complex - some more than others. I suggest you stop reading about the different diagnoses. Doctors diagnose a patient with a disorder if that patient's behaviour causes them a lot of distress, and if they meet several of the symptoms in one cluster. I read somewhere that the vast majority of the general population would meet the diagnositc criteria for at least one PD if they were to fill out those diagnostic questionnaire tests.
MissMay - i hope the self help book works for you - having a mood disorder and borderline traits must make life a challenge at times.
Thanks. Life is very much of a challenge. It sucks but I am dealing with it the best I can.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top