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bipolar
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No....not a guy. I was manic as hell when I made this account. I had an account here before but I couldn't remember my password at the time so I just made this account because I wanted to talk to someone if I remember correctly.

I never intended to post under the name Frank.lol

In fact, when I got the email about accounts being compromised I freaked out because I didn't even remember making this account. I asked them to close it because I had 0 posts at that point but they told me I needed a reason.

I keep thinking now that I use it I should change my username but I'm lazy.

Anyways, it's good you found a medicine that works for you.

What I take.... Seroquel....is an ap and mood stabilizer but I have lots of bad side effects when I take it. Besides weight gain I have a really hard time breathing at night through my nose.

I messed up my back really bad a few days ago so now I'm taking valium and hydrocodone.
If start to sound loopy in posts during the next week...that's why.
No worries Frank. :) ( I quite like that name)

Yeah they tried to give me Seroquel one time in hospital - I was there getting off Xanax and the shrinks went through a stage of using it in low doses for anxiety. It just made me dizzy and then knocked me out for ages. It didn't even feel like sleep - more like I was unconscious. And i felt groggy for the next day or so, it was horrible. It might affect me differently if I was really manic though, I'm not sure.

I think this stuff is working - but I'm a bit worried about it too. At least I've started seeing my psych again now. For a long time I didn't really want to.
 

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@don Thank you, I'll be sure to take you up on that offer sometime. Yeah, it's a pretty tough thing to deal with. The problem is when people start on a manic episode, all these thoughts and beliefs that are going on in their head, no matter how irrational they sound to us, are completely real for them. You can try and convince them otherwise but they simply cannot be reasoned with. I could literally write a novel about all the strange things that I've witnessed during my partner's manic episodes over the years, some of them were often quite elaborate. At one point they became obsessed with numbers, patterns and government conspiracies; they had this note pad and they had wrote pages and pages of strange codes, formulas and number sequences, it was very bizarre.

Once someone has been diagnosed though, it can be a manageable condition. Once you have seen the manic episodes first hand, you start to learn what the warning signs are that occur before full on mania. With my partner they start sleeping less, they won't want to eat, they start to talk about obscure things, they might start spending money eratically. This is when I know I need to get them to start taking anti psychotic medication again, and ideally you need to remove them from any stressful situations and try to keep them as calm as possible, as it is stress what normally triggers the mania. If you do this then that will normally bring them back to reality again after a few days.
 

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bipolar
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@don Thank you, I'll be sure to take you up on that offer sometime. Yeah, it's a pretty tough thing to deal with. The problem is when people start on a manic episode, all these thoughts and beliefs that are going on in their head, no matter how irrational they sound to us, are completely real for them. You can try and convince them otherwise but they simply cannot be reasoned with. I could literally write a novel about all the strange things that I've witnessed during my partner's manic episodes over the years, some of them were often quite elaborate. At one point they became obsessed with numbers, patterns and government conspiracies; they had this note pad and they had wrote pages and pages of strange codes, formulas and number sequences, it was very bizarre.

Once someone has been diagnosed though, it can be a manageable condition. Once you have seen the manic episodes first hand, you start to learn what the warning signs are that occur before full on mania. With my partner they start sleeping less, they won't want to eat, they start to talk about obscure things, they might start spending money eratically. This is when I know I need to get them to start taking anti psychotic medication again, and ideally you need to remove them from any stressful situations and try to keep them as calm as possible, as it is stress what normally triggers the mania. If you do this then that will normally bring them back to reality again after a few days.
Yes I've heard of that sort of thing but I don't think I had anything quite that extreme. That big episode about 4 years ago was the worst for me. Like I mentioned before I can't remember a lot of the details - some, but not all of it, which is very frustrating. For ages I didn't know where I was that Christmas day - but my son said I called him and said sorry I wasn't there. I was in a hotel in bloody Paris! I remember aspects of that trip but I have no memory of calling him at all. It's very strange - and a lot of other things I did too. Some of it is possibly good that I don't remember though. Just lucky I got back home in one piece.
 

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@don Yeah the whole paranoia / conspiracy / obsession thing is quite a common trait apparently during manic episodes. Sometimes people can also start to believe that they are a divine being and have some sort of special mission / calling to carry out. During one manic episode, my partner came home wearing a flack jacket and tactical utility holsters that they had purchased from an army surplus store. They had it in their head that they were a MI5 agent and needed to prepare for a mission. I can only imagine what crazy stories they must have been telling the shop owner.
 

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SAS Member
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@don Yeah the whole paranoia / conspiracy / obsession thing is quite a common trait apparently during manic episodes. Sometimes people can also start to believe that they are a divine being and have some sort of special mission / calling to carry out. During one manic episode, my partner came home wearing a flack jacket and tactical utility holsters that they had purchased from an army surplus store. They had it in their head that they were a MI5 agent and needed to prepare for a mission. I can only imagine what crazy stories they must have been telling the shop owner.
I believed I was dead in my first episode and thought my body was buried somewhere else.

I usually just end up in bed though shaking and scared.

The signs are the same for me....I quit eating and sleeping. Food really repulses me. I swear that I could drink a bottle of whiskey and take 10 sleeping pills and not be knocked out.

I would never hurt anyone but I may inadvertently hurt myself....like my jumping out of the car.

It's almost hard to believe you can come back from such craziness and be perfectly normal again (or almost normal -im bpd too).

Your partner is lucky to have you watching out for them.
 

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@frankhassa Yeah the excessive energy thing can be hard to deal with. During the last episode I managed to get my other half over to the doctors (after lots of convincing) and they were prescribed some diazepam. They had about five in the course of the day, as well as some liquor and they still wouldn't calm down or go to bed.

True, you usually find despite the frantic behaviour, people on a manic high won't become violent towards others, at least in my experience anyway. They tend to pose more of a danger to themselves if anything. Like once I woke up in the middle of the night to the sound of the fire alarms and my partner had put the grill on, and I think it must have been left on for hours and they had forgotten about it, as the house became full of smoke and the kitchen was raging hot. And another time they went through a phase of lighting candles and putting them in strange areas around the house, one fell over and managed to set fire to the kitchen work top. Luckily I managed to extinguish it before the whole house went up.

I know exactly what you mean about switching from mania to normality, my other half is exactly like that, once the manic episode is over they revert back to their normal self again. Fortunately for now, the manic episodes seem to be under control and don't occur all too often, only during times of high stress.
 

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bipolar
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@frankhassa Yeah the excessive energy thing can be hard to deal with. During the last episode I managed to get my other half over to the doctors (after lots of convincing) and they were prescribed some diazepam. They had about five in the course of the day, as well as some liquor and they still wouldn't calm down or go to bed.

True, you usually find despite the frantic behaviour, people on a manic high won't become violent towards others, at least in my experience anyway. They tend to pose more of a danger to themselves if anything. Like once I woke up in the middle of the night to the sound of the fire alarms and my partner had put the grill on, and I think it must have been left on for hours and they had forgotten about it, as the house became full of smoke and the kitchen was raging hot. And another time they went through a phase of lighting candles and putting them in strange areas around the house, one fell over and managed to set fire to the kitchen work top. Luckily I managed to extinguish it before the whole house went up.
Yeah, I'd agree with that. I'm more of a danger to myself too. Although other people could get caught in the crossfire so to speak. I drove a car I'd bought at up to a hundred miles an hour in the rain at night down the M1 to London. I don't think I even knew what the big hurry was. "Frantic" is a very good word to use in that state - it describes it perfectly.
 

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Seeking a relationship
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What you say there is actually true. You do feel more confident when you're manic. You can get into relationships or just have a lot of sex etc because the anxiety is a lot less. But things like that can get out of control very easily - you can get involved with people that you normally wouldn't if you weren't manic - plus do a lot of other things that can get you into big trouble.

I don't really feel comfortable talking about some of those things on this forum - but you should know that it's not always as pleasant as you might think it is now.

You can't diagnose yourself - but I would also say you probably have a good idea of what's happening to you. I've often wondered about you too - from your posts before.

Are you seeing a psychiatrist and have you talked about all this with him?
I dunno. While I tend to be more outgoing, talkative and perhaps confident during a manic episode the anxiety is still there. However, on rare occasions the anxiety is lower or nearly gone. I tend to become overexcited/overstimulated during my manic episode which results in me becoming more jumpy, talkative to help calm me down. Maybe we all experience our mania differently..
 

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bipolar
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I dunno. While I tend to be more outgoing, talkative and perhaps confident during a manic episode the anxiety is still there. However, on rare occasions the anxiety is lower or nearly gone. I tend to become overexcited/overstimulated during my manic episode which results in me becoming more jumpy, talkative to help calm me down. Maybe we all experience our mania differently..
Yes, I would say that's definitely true. Even my own manic episodes are different to each other. The ones I've had more recently have been quite different to when I was manic a few years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
^ Lol, I've watched that recently - it was pretty cool. Yeah, what I have noticed is that I used to have alot more sex when I was taking prozac. Am I having sex now? No way. Not even when I feel some kind of mania or happiness, no. And there is nothing wrong if I would, it's not like I am promiscuous. But puhlease, if I were on prozac still, yes I would not have a single thing in my mind to keep me back from doing ****. Why does it seem like a bad thing to have sex when you feel manic? Just see it as being happy and more outgoing and more willing to go out and get sex? Not a big deal unless you become promiscuous and cheat, okay. I mean, it's okay as long as you're not hurting anyone, you could have casual sex with 100+ and still be single and not hurt anyone.
 

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My manic episode, although I feel good inside, aren't pretty. They usually start by me for example talking gibberish and messaging everyone on my Facebook with rubbish. Then I go onto become quite violent towards the end either hitting people or smashing objects. I've been told this is bipolar recently. Does it sound like it could be?
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Discussion Starter #55
My manic episode, although I feel good inside, aren't pretty. They usually start by me for example talking gibberish and messaging everyone on my Facebook with rubbish. Then I go onto become quite violent towards the end either hitting people or smashing objects. I've been told this is bipolar recently. Does it sound like it could be?
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Ahh, hmm, I enjoy posting gibberish/rubbish on facebook, it makes me feel alive. Hmm, I am not usually violent during happy days, I do feel alot of aggressiveness which I trade in for being able to go outside and do stuff that would cause some social anxiety. So try to do that instead of hitting people or smashing objects.
 
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